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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-TWO. 

SEPTEMBER 23, 1908— SEPTEMBER 15, 1909. 



Tit! 



No. Page 



Abdul Hamid II. of Turkey. Deposed... 33 

Aberrations of Sound. Strange 16 

Abolish Pay-Checks. To 44 

Abraham Lincoln 21 

Absinthe Prohibition 3 

Airship Crosses Straits of Dover 47 

Accident and Rest Laws 1 

Accidents in Coal Mines 4 

Accidents, British Motor 6 

Accident- to British Railroadmen 9 

Accidents. Railroad, in United States.... 9 

Accidents, Industrial 20 

Accidents in Glass Industry 28 

Accidents, British Railway 50 

Accounts of Trade-Union 31 

A. F. of L. — Convention Proceedings, etc. — 

A. F. of L. Convention Call 3 

A. F. of L. in Political Campaign 4 

A. F. of L. Convention 7-6; 9-1; 10-1; 

Appeal for Hatters 30 

Call for Defense Fund 21 

Campaign Fund Receipt- and Expenses 23 

Gompers Re-elected 10 

"Grand Old Man." Our 20 

Labor Supports Gompers 8 

Robins' Address on Labor 48 

Seamen's Legislation 11 

Seamen and Longshoremen 11 

African Whaling Enterprise 3 

African Diamond Fields 44 

Against Raising the Maine 38 

Agency. A Labor Press ( By "E! 

Tuerto") 32 

A Hero (By "El Tuerto") 17 

Aid to Refugees 32 

Alaskan Dog, The 20 

American Home Market 5 

American Whalers Ousted 12 

America, Early Discoveries of 51 

Ancient Ships, Home of 31 

Apprentices in Great Britain 20 

Appropriations for United States Gov- 
ernment 15 

Appropriations. United State- Navy 21 

Appropriations by Congress 37 

Appropriations for Census, United States 41 



12 

3 

7 

1 

11 

12 

2 

13 

10 

4 

14 

8 

2 

10 

10 



2 

1 

11-1 

2 

7 

15 

6 

7 

6 

1 

10 

6 

11 

2 

3 

11 
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11 
3 

11 
3 

11 

1.1 
12 
13 

13 



Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Coal Miners. New Zealand. Retain 

Right to Strike 15 

Compulsion Again Defeated 8 

"Country With Strikes," A 2 

Court of Arbitration 4 

Penalties for Violating Arbitration 
Awards 6-4; 8-4; 10-4; 11-4; 16-4; 

17-4; 18-11: 23-15; 38-4; 

Pennsylvania's Compulsory Arbitration 

Law. Invalid 52 

Arctic. Life in the 4 

Army Estimates. British 25 

Wound the World Via Siberia 20 

Aspirations of the Filipino 42 

Assault On Hency. The 9 

Atlantic Department — 

Atlantic Supports Lake- 34 

Barge Order. Disagree mi 14 

Biggest Schooner Afloat IS 

Chinese on Fruiters 1 

Chinese Sailor- on the Gulf 28 

Crimp Held for Trial 3 

Congratulation- to Mr. and Mrs. Sher- 
aton 34 



41-4 

15 

2 

12 



Title Xo. Page 

Deceased Members 19 3 

Firemen Take Notice! 23 3 

Fisherman Stuck to Wheel 2 3 

Five-Master Breaks Records 5 3 

"Hero's" Pay, A 21 3 

Hudson Bay Port 3 

Longest Passage on Record — Savan- 
nah-Boston 9 3 

New Firemen's Union .• 23 3 

Officer's Fraudulent Papers 1 3 

Pay of Crew Stopped (Republicl 21 3 

"Pirates" in the Southern Seas 15 3 

Protest Against Long Tows 12 3 

Sea-Coffins Doomed 17 3 

Seamen's Benefits 19 3 

Seaman Got His Wages 28 3 

Seamen Wanted 30 10 

Secretary Frazier Reports 23 3 

St. Mary's to be Burned 5 3 

Suppressing A Mutiny 34 3 

Tugmen Win Strike 15 3 

Turks Island Devastated 7 3 

Verona in a Storm 3 3 

Wireless. New Use for 5 3 

Yumuri, Wreck of the 2 3 

Atlantic Travel Shrinks 17 3 

Atlantic Coast Wrecks 29 3 

Atlantis. Music of 36 10 

Auction. "White Slaves" Sold at 22-4; 23-6 

Australia and the Fleet 4 2 

Australia, Industrial Troubles in 28 4 

Australia, Gold Production of 36 9 

Australia. Label in 5(1 7 

Austria, Furuseth in 1 7 

Austrian Printing Invention 20 3 

Awards. Nobel Prize 20 3 

B 

Baptism, Fresh, Needed 17 11 

Barges Subject to Inspection 15 12 

Barge-Tows Limited 15 12 

Battleship Speed, Highest 9 13 

Belgium, Unemployed In 19 4 

Bench Worship 29 11 

Berlin, Unemployed in 12 4 

Berlin. Modern '. 41 11 

Biggest Ferry-Boat 29 3 

"Billy" Sunday on the Label 37 3 

Births and Deaths in San Francisco 26 13 

"Boatswain" (By "El Tuerto") 51 2 

Boats, Concrete 50 8 

Boomerang. England's Naval 37 11 

Boy Labor In England 29-11; 48-9 

Boycott, Early Record of 16 3 

Boycott. Principle of the 18 2 

Boycott, Origin of 28 10 

Boycott, Supreme Court Upholds 45 1 

Boycott by Another Name 47 6 

Benefits Paid by British Trade-Unions.. 39 4 

Brave Deed Honored 29 10 

Brazil. Immigrant- in 36 7 

Bremen. Trade of 35 11 

Bristol's New Dock 12-8; 50-11 

British Motor Accident- 6 10, 

British Shipbuilding Slump 6 11 

British Trade-Union Congress 8 2 

British Shipping 9 11 

British Old-Age Pensions 16 3 

British Unemployed, The 19 11 

British Army Estimates 25 12 

Briti-h Food [mports 32 2 

British Manning Scale .....41-2: 49-6 

British Postoffice 36 10 

British Trade-Unions, Benefits Paid by.. 39 4 
British Trade-Unions. Membership and 

Fund- 37-4; 39-4 



Title No. Page 

British Railway Accidents 50 10 

Broken Vovage A ( By "El Tuerto" i S 2 

Builders of the Ship, The 12 7 

Bucko, Heacock Discharges 14 6 

Burial Customs, Oriental 17 10 

"Business," Religion And 29 6 

C 

Calcutta. Port of 30 10 

Canadian Labor Unions 6 2 

Canadian Port. New 21 11 

Canadian Shipbuilding '. . 29 11 

Canada. Immigration to 14 13 

Canada's Internal Waterways 42 9 

Canal. Welland 3 11 

Canal Will Pay. Why 13 3 

Canal, Sabine-Neches 17 3 

Canal, Panama. Total Expenditures on... 34 14 

Canal, Panama, Dimensions of 36 3 

Canal, Cape Cod, Work Begun 43 14 

Canal. Cape Cod 44 3 

Canal, Panama, Appropriations for Year 45 13 

Capital. Our Undemocratic 46 9 

Case of San Francisco, The 52 1 

Casualties on Fourth of July 43 13 

Census, Cost of 13 13 

Census of Peking ,. 23 11 

Census. United States, Appropriations 

for 41 13 

Centenary of Lincoln 21 6 

Chainmaking in England 35 11 

Changes in Steamers 24 11 

Charity and Wage Earnings 33 10 

Chester's Trial Trips 9 3 

Chicago, Murders in 16 13 

Chicago, Foreigners in 47 13 

Chicago, Population of 2-14: 50-13 

Child Labor, Newspapers Not Merchan- 
dise 4 13 

Child Labor in Great Britain 27 10 

Child- Labor Governor 30 3 

Child Labor in Great Britain 43 9 

China, Development of 6 11 

China, Industrial Future of 18 2 

China's Composite Population 18 10 

China's Industrial Awakening 20 10 

China. Hair From 51 11 

Chinese Justice of the Peace 33 13 

Chinese Pouulation 38 11 

Chronicle fires of Itself 48 7 

Cities, Democracy of Foreign 17 10 

Clermont. First Trip of the 42 3 

Climate. Scotland's Healthy 48 11 

Clippers, Old. Sold 14 5 

Coal on the Lakes 5 8 

Coast Seamen's Journal — 

Resolutions By I. S. U. A., on 14 11 

Volume Twenty-two 1 6 

Coastwise Privilege Extended 48 3 

Combine. Shipowners' 30 11 

Commandments, Trade-Union 41 8 

Commerce of the Elbe 35 11 

Commissioner Almy's Letter 43 6 

Compass, Reduced Diameter 22 11 

Competition, Indian 19 3 

Compulsory Insurance Abroad 6-11; 18-10 

Concrete Boats 45-3; 50-8 

Congress. Maguire for 1 6 

Congress and Shipping Laws 26 2 

Congress, Appropriations by 37 13 

Constitutional Government in Turkey... 14 4 

Consumption, Mortality From 32 10 

"Con-umption Cure's" 48 3 

Contracts, Largest New 50 11 

Control of the Yellow River 44 2 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-TWO. 



Title No. Page 

Co-operation in Germany 4 2 

ration in Great Britain 40 4 

of the White Plague 6 10 

m Factories, Workers in 9 10 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Action Against Trade-Unions 36 11 

Crimps Sen! to Prison 8 2 

Damages for Fireman's I 'oath 4 10 

Damages for Cruelty 36 5 

Decision in Witthof Case 16 1 

Deductions From Wages 52 2 

Illegally Boarding Vessel 40 3 

Liability to Seamen 36 11 

Merchant Shipping Acts 32 11 

Offenses Against Discipline 20 2 

' Ivertime Awarded 31 6 

Payment of Labor .Members 16 10 

Salvage to Crew of Charles Xelson... 28 5 
Seamen's Wages Can Not Be Gar- 

nisheed 13 5 

Seaman Reco.vers Wages 29 6 

Seamen Returning to Ships 30 3 

Shipowner and Sea Captain 22 3 

Trade-Union Acts 36 11 

Whalers Secure Damages 39 1 

Widow Denied Damages 6 3 

Witthof Award Affirmed 13 6 

Creator of the German Fleet 37 9 

Ciews, High-Priced 19 6 

Crews, Standard of Skill fur 34 7 

Criminals. No, Wanted 37 6 

Crimping Institute, A 29 7 

Crossing the Polar Seas 12 3 

Cuba. Population of 25 12 

Cullman Diamond. The 9 10 

Cunard Steamship Company. Profits of.. 31 14 



D 



"Dandy Mike's" Yarn (By "El Tuerto") 49 2 

Danish Millers' Wages 13 8 

I larrow. "Gem-" From 52 6 

Sea. Motor Boats on the 19 11 

Death Rate Among Miners 4 13 

I i' bt, Japan's I luge 52 11 

Democracy of Foreign Cities 17 10 

Denmark. Unemployed in 49 11 

Dental Treatment in Schools 15 3 

Department of Labor, Canada 43 3 

Derelicts, Clearing the Sea of 18 3 

"Desertion," Frazier on 26 3 

"Desertion" Laws. State , 26 6 

Development of China 6 11 

Development of tin- Steamship 39 3 

Diamond, the Cullinan 9 10 

Definition of "Scab" 39 9 

Diamond Fields, African 44 2 

Dime! Give A 30 6 

Dimensions of Panama Canal 36 3 

Disappeared at Sea ■ 21 11 

Discipline on Shipboard 33 3 

Discrimination, Judicial 1 11 

Discoveries, Early, of America 51 11 

Dock. Bristol's New 12 8 

Ri( i de Janeiro 15 3 

Dock. Largest in the World 20 9 

Dock. Bristol's Xew 50 11 

Doctors' Strike in Switzerland 1 4 

Dog, the Alaskan 20 2 

on the "Open Shop" 40 3 

Drew Ship to Her Doom 11 3 

Dundee Jute Industry 38 2 

Durban, Port of 4 2 

Dutch Seaport, a Great 19 10 

Dwellings in Rio Janeiro 43 11 

E 

Earth, Is the, Old or Young? 36 11 

Earnings and Incomes 8 3 

Earnings of Railroads 10 14 

Earthquake at Messina 16 14 

Earthquake at Teheran _. 23 14 

Echo Prevents Collision 10 3 

Education, Limitations of 50 9 

Efficiency. Standard of ■ 33 7 

Elbe. Traffic on the 1-3; 35-11 

Electricity Vs. Gas 20 2 

Electoral and Popular Vote, Taft and 

Bryan 8-14; 16-13 

"El Tuerto" Explains 22 7 

Emigration, to Control 5 8 

Emigration from Germany 21 3 

Emigration from Ireland 34 12 

Emigration, German 38 2 

Empire, Second City of the 11 11 

Employers' Liability in France 5 7 

Employment for Unemployed 5 11 

England in 1950 5 2 

England, Unemployed in 19 4 

England, Boy Labor in 29 11 

England. Unemployed in 34 10 

England. Chainmaking in 35 11 

England's Naval Boomerang 37 11 

England. Pauperism in 41 10 

England, Living in 44 9 

England, Profit-Sharing in 49 3 

England, Cost of Living in 51 10 

Enlisted Man, The 33 6 

"Equinoctial" Storms 4 3 

Eureka. Gillett Paints 28 2 

Evil, the Pay-Check 43 6 

Executions and Sentences, Russian, 1908 19 14 

Executions in Russia 27 12 

Experiment, Harbor 28 11 



Title 



No. Page 



Facts About London 3 10 

Famous Devotees of Tobacco 24 10 

Federations, Labor, in Great Britain... 43 4 

Ferry-Boat, Biggest 29 3 

Fertilizer, Seaweed as a 38 3 

Fifty Knots an Hour 39 3 

Filipino, Aspirations of the 42 1 

First Trip of the Clermont 42 3 

Fisheries — 

Alaska Fishermen's Union 4 7 

British Columbia Salmon 22 11 

Canadian Fishing Industry 25 10 

Captain, Spare That Net! 47 7 

Columbia River Lack 51 5 

Court Protects Fisheries 26 2 

Fish as Fertilizer 50 2 

Fishermen's Conference 12 1 

Fishing in Scotland 6 3 

Hatching Whitefish 33 11 

Japanese Fisheries 22 2 

Japanese Whale Fisheries 22 11 

Losses of Gloucester Fishing Fleet... 18 12 

Modem Mode of Whaling 36 3 

Motor Fishing Boats 3^ 10 

Norwegian Sardine Trade 6 11 

Nova Scotia Fishing 1-10; 35-11 

Propagation of Salmon 5 11 

Salmon Catch Falling Off 50 2 

Total Salmon Pack of Pacific Coast... 23 5 

United Fishermen, Report of 35 2 

Meet, Australia and the 4 2 

Fog, to Eliminate 35 2 

F I. Retail Prices of 1907 2 13 

Food Imports, British 32 2 

Food, Seaweed as 44 10 

Fourth of July. Number of Casualties... 43 13 

Foreign-Built Yachts 47 3 

Foreigners in Chicago 47 13 

Formation and Size of Icebergs 36 ' 3 

Foster, Frank K„ Death of 42 6 

Foster's Masterpiece 46 1 

Foster, Frank K . Life of 50 11 

Fourth, Lessons of the 42 6 

France, Employer-' Liability in 5 7 

France, Waterways of 32 10 

France, Highest and Lowest Wages in.. 35 4 

Franchise in Germany 19 10 

Frazier on "Desertion" 26 3 

Free-Trade Trust, A 5 10 

Free Press, A 19 3 

French Tobacco Monopoly 15 4 

French Strike, The 35 6 

French in Quebec. The 37 11 

French Seamen's Strike 47 11 

French Trade-Unions 50 4 

Furuseth in Austria 1 7 

Furuseth on the Lake Strike 43 1 

Furuseth on Subsidies 49 6 

Furuseth's Suit Against Pacific Mail 

Company 50 5 

Furuseth at San Jose 51 1 

G 

Gambling, Shipping Insurance 12 10 

Garment Worker-' Label 27 7 

< las, Electricity vs 20 2 

Gas-Driven Ship 41 10 

"Gems" from Darrow 52 6 

Genius, For the Promotion of 30 11 

Genoa, Workmen's Homes in 13 8 

German Shipping, Subsidies for 6 2 

German Establishment, Great 6 10 

German Care for Workingmen 20 10 

German Fleet. Creator of the 37 9 

German Emigration 38 2 

German Seamen's Convention 44 10 

Germany, Trusts in 3 10 

Germany, Co-operation in 4 2 

Germany, Public Schools of 14 8 

Germany, Population of 16 11 

Germany, Franchise in 19 10 

Germany, Emigration from 21 3 

Germany, Tenements in 27 10 

Germany, Shipbuilding in 36 7 

Germany's Insurance Law 52 2 

Ghent a Seaport 2 10 

Gilded Cod of Massachusetts 33 3 

Gillett Vetoes Seamen's Bill 28 1 

Gillett Paints Eureka 28 2 

Give a Dime! 30 6 

Gjoa Presented to San Francisco 14-5; 40-5,6 

Gjoa Placed in Golden Gate Park, San 

Francisco 42 5 

Gjoa's Last Voyage, The 42 6 

Glasgow Labor Conditions 12 11 

Glass Industry, Accidents in 28 2 

Gold Production of Australia 36 9 

Governor, Child-Labor 30 3 

Graving Piece, The (By "El Tuerto")... 21 2 

Great Britain, Apprentices in 20 11 

Great Britain, Unemployed in 22 2 

Great Britain, Child-Labor in 27 10 

Great Britain, Unemployed in 33 4 

Great Britain, Co-operation in 40 4 

Great Britain, Labor Federations in 43 4 

Great Britain, Child-Labor in 43 9 

Great Britain, Trade-Unions in 44 4 

Great Britain, Population of 46-4; 51-11 

Great Shipyard. A 14 3 

Greyhounds to the Scrap Heap 17 10 

Growth of Pension System 20 11 

Gfowth of Xew York 36 10 



Title 



Xo. I 



H 



Hair from China 51 11 

Hamburg, Port of 33 3 

Hangman as Surgeon, The 29 10 

1 1 arbor of San Francisco 3-1 ; 5-2 

Harbor of Valparaiso 12 11 

Harbor Experiment 2>i 11 

Hardtack and Its Uses 27 3 

Hatter-' Strike Declared 18 15 

Hatters' Strike. The 19 7 

Hatters' Statement 2-> 2 

Hatters, Help the 28 6 

Haunted Shipmaster. The 36 6 

Havre, Improvement- at ?1 11 

Hawaii, Jap Children in 26 13 

lleacock Discharges Bucko 14 6 

Heney, The Assault on 9 6 

Henry George's Birthday 51 (> 

Heroes of Latin America 27 3 

I [eroes of the Ohio 51 7,8 

Iligh-Priced Crews 19 6 

Himalayas, The Surpassing 30 11 

Home of Ancient Ship.- 31 3 

Home, Union Printers' 31 11 

Honduras Seeks Labor 12 8 

Hostility of Manufacturers 49 1 

Hubbard's Assault on Labor 41 1 

I [udson-FultOn Centenary 32-3; 52-3 

Hudson, Henry, Life of 50 3 

Humanitarian. Unionism 33 7 

Humanity, Hives of 52 2 

I 

I ebergs, Formation and Size of 36 3 

Iceberg. Peril of the 51 3 

[mitativeness of Japanese 29 2 

Immigrant- in Brazil 36 7 

Immigration to Canada 14 13 

Immigration to United States. 1908 20 15 

Immigration to Xew York from Iceland 27 13 

Immigration, Siberian 43 11 

Immigration, Population and 45 3 

Improvements at Havre 31 11 

Incomes, Earnings and 8 3 

Income Tax Amendment Submitted 45 13 

India. Cost of Living in 20 3 

Indian Competition 19 3 

Indebtedness of Xew York 20 2 

Industrial Education, Mexican 12 8 

Industrial Future of China 18 2 

Industrial Accidents 20 8 

Industrial Awakening, China's 20 10 

Industrial Trouble- in Australia 28 4 

Industry in Sweden , 20 9 

Injunction, Government by, etc. — 

All Summed Up 6 6 

Be Candid. Gentlemen! 5 1 

Boycott Declared Legal 45 6 

Buck Injunction Modified 30 7 

California Labor Speaks 4 6 

California and the Injunction 43 7 

Constitutional Liberty Imperiled 26 1 

Courts Xot Infallible" 24 10 

Decision Reviewed. The 22 1 

Federation on Injunctions 11 6 

First Injunction Issued in the Philip- 
pines 39 15 

For and Against Injunctions 52 10 

Frazier on Injunction- 25 3 

"Going the Whole Hog" 1 6 

Gompers State- the Issue 6 1 

Gompers. Mitchell and Morrison Sen- 
tenced for Contempt 15 15 

Gompers, Mitchell, Morrison 15 6 

Gompers Not a Lawbreaker 16 6 

Gomper-' Address to the Court 29 2 

Government by Injunction 1 2 

Hammond Injunction, The 19 6 

Hammond Contempt Case 23 1 

Hammond Decision. The 23 6 

Injunction Modified 26 7 

"I Told You So!" S 1 

Judicial Discrimination 1 11 

Labor Voices Protest 16 6 

Xew Injunction Policy 9 6 

Xo Pardon Sought 15 6 

Xo Right in Patronage 25 10 

Public Opinion on the Sentence 17 6 

Supreme Court Upholds Boycott 45 1 

What the Sentence Means 17 1 

Insanity, Insurance Against 36 11 

Institute. A Crimping 29 7 

Insurance. Unemployed 3 2 

Insurance, Compulsory 6 11 

Insurance, Savings Bank 8 3 

Insurance, Compulsory Abroad 18 10 

Insurance Law, Germany's 52 2 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Call for International Assessment 39 7 

Convention Call 3 6 

Furuseth's Report 15 1 

Greeting to the Seamen 10 6 

International Conference 46 6 

Manning. Seamen on 2 1 

Seamen and Longshoremen 11 6 

Seamen's Legislation (A. F. of L. Con- 
vention) 11 10 

Seamen's Convention 13-1 ; 14 1 

Successful Convention. A 14 6 

International Trade-Unions 7 11 

Ireland. Old \ge Pen-ion- in 20 4 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-TWO. 



Title No. Page 

Ireland, Immigration to New York from 27 13 

Ireland, Emigration from 34 12 

Iron Trades Workday 12 6 

Italian Seamen's Union 44 10 

Italy, Trade-Unions in 14 14 

Ivory Sale, London 9 11 

J-K 

Japanese and Chinese Exclusion — 

Again "Settled" 22 6 

Anti-Jap Laundry League 1 7 

Chinese Immigration at San Francisco 14 5 

Chinese Immigration, Increase of 17 15 

Chinese Ordered Deported Not En- 
titled to Jury Trial 21 

Citizenship, Seamen Denied 44 

Exclusion Sentiment 27 

Exclusion A Race Question 34 

"Hang" the Agitators 18 

Hindoo Colony Removed 6 

Inefficient Japanese Labor 22 

Japanese Colonies in Brazil 12 

Japs in the Islands 20 

Jap Children in Hawaii 26 

Jap Labor a Failure 30 

National Anti-Asiatic League 2 

Orientals in Hawaii 11 

Straus and the Chinese 13 

Strike of Japs in Hawaii 37 

Taft and Fxclusion 5 

Wages in Japanese Shipyards 12 

Japanese, Imitativeness of 29 

Japanese Strike in Hawaii 37 

Japan, P. and O. Losing to S 

Japan's Huge Debt 52 

Japs Emigrating to Peru 29 

Joe Grimes, Beachcomber (By "El 

Tuerto") 42 

Jubilee, the Molders' 44 

Jute Workers' Wages 18 

Jute Industry, Dundee 38 

Keefe, D. J., Appointed Commissioner 

of Immigration 12 

Kirby, the New Roland 44 

Krishna's Ring (By "El Tuerto") 24 



13 

14 

6 

6 

6 

14 

10 

9 

6 

13 

10 

10 

11 

6 

15 

6 

9 

2 

15 

11 

11 

10 

2 
6 
3 
2 

15 
1 
2 



Label 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor, 

Labor 

Labor, 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor, 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor, 

Labor 

Labor, 

Labor, 

Labor 

Labor 



in Australia 50 

Insurance, Russian 6 

Ministry, Australian 9 

Honduras Seeks 12 

Conditions, Glasgow 12 

R oosevelt on 18 

in England, Boy 29 

Council Calls Strikes 31 

Press Agency, A (By "El Tuerto") 32 

Problems of (By Joseph Treu) . . 35 

Hubbard's Assault on 41 

Question, Race Question 41 

and Liquor 41 

Department of, Canada 43 

Federations in Great Britain 43 

Robins' Address on 48 

Boy 48 

Day 50 

Day Press 52 

Laker. Department — 

Accidents of a Week 

2-8; 3-8; 6-9; 49-8; 50-8,9; 

Jolts by Joshua 

2-9; 3-9; 4-9; 5-9; 7-9; 8-9; 22-9; 23-8; 

26-9; 

Steward Killed 1 

Owners Wanted Strike 2 

You First, Mr. Vesselowner 3 

Lake Carriers Not Reasonable 4 

Duties of Members 5 

Fate of the Strike-Breaker 6 

Tampico Port Improvement 7 

Union's Membership, The 7 

Lake Carriers' Tactics 7 

Official Notice 8 

"Promises" 8 

ikippcr's Right Impaired 9 

Stick to the Union! 15 

Employment Agent Convicted 17 

Deceased Members, 1908 18 

Lake Seamen's Conference 19 

Soo Canal Traffic, 1908 20 

"Best Laid Plans," The 21 

Lake Carriers' "Welfare" Plan 22 

Lake Seamen and Carriers 22 

Official Notice 22 

Shipping Federation 23 

Lockout of 1908, The 23 

Growth of Lake Shipping 25 

"Wages Must Be Cut" 25 

Modern Slavery 25 

Coming Lake Season 26 

Struggle on the Lakes, The 26 

Olander Addresses Seamen 26 

Lake Carriers Plan Serfdom 27 

Past, Present and Future 27 

Spun by a Landlubber 28 

I ake Carriers' Plans 28 

A Few Questions 28 

I .umber Carriers' Trust 29 

Lake Situation 29 

On the Great Lakes 30 

International Strike Law 30 

"Open Shop" 30 

Keep Cool! 30 

Engineers, Firemen. Etc., Go on Strike 30 



7 

10 

13 

8 

11 

1 

11 

11 

11 

3 

1 

6 

6 

3 

4 

1 

9 

6 

7 



51-8 



27-9 
8 
8 



Title No. Page 

Lake Seamen and Carriers 31 6 

Ten Thousand to Charity 31 8 

Cool-Headedness Wins 31 8 

Good Luck to the Lakes 32 6 

Police Protection 32 8 

Seamen Pledge Support 33 6 

What the Seamen Want 33 8 

Stay Away From the Lakes 34 6 

The Fight Is On 34 8 

Lake Seamen and the Public 35 6 

What Seamen Are Fighting for 35 8 

Vesselowners Bluffing 35 8 

Statement From Engineers 35 9 

Shooting at Toledo 35 9 

All's Well on the Lakes 37 6 

Lake Seamen Winning. 37 8 

Tony, He Take a Steamboat 37 9 

Sentiment Against Carriers 38 6 

Labor Indorses Strike 38 8 

Yates Answers Livingstone 39 8 

"Nothing to Arbitrate" 39 9 

Norway, No Men From 40 6 

Strike Situation, The 40 8 

Wreck of the Canal 40 8 

Not Fair for the Goose 41 8 

Lake Carriers and the Law 41 8 

Progress on the Lakes 42 6 

College-Bred Scabs 42 8 

Furuseth on the Lake Strike 43 1 

Backing Up the Lakes 44 6 

Progress of the Strike 44 8 

An Apology 44 8 

Vesselowners Begin to Doubt 45 8 

Poor Excuse Better Than None 45 8 

Moral Question, A 45 9 

Underwriters' Big Bill 46 8 

James Purvis, Murderer 46 8 

Brown, Richard, Death of 46 8 

Woods, William, Death of 46 8 

Autocratic Lake Carriers 46 9 

College Students Scabs 47 8 

"Good Old Days." in The 47 9 

In Memoriam. Comrades Brown and 

Woods 47 8, 9 

Up to the Inspectors 48 6 

Engineers Make Good Fight ■. . . . 48 8 

Comrade Patterson All Right 48 8 

Condemns "Welfare" Plan 48 -8 

Lake Controversy, The 48 9 

Keep Away! 50 6,8 

Hayes on Lake Strike 50 8 

Lot of the Strike-Breaker 51 8 

Lakes, Coal on the 5 8 

Land of the Midnight Sun 25 2 

Largest Wooden Schooner 13 12 

Largest Trade-Union in the World 20 4 

Largest Dock in the World 20 9 

Largest New Contracts 50 11 

Laws, Accident and Rest 1 2 

Laws of Naval Warfare 29 3 

Laws, Obsolete 44 2 

Lessons of the Fourth 42 6 

Leper Cured 5 13 

Letter, Commissioner Almy's 43 6 

"Liberality" In Seaports 48 6 

Liberty, Seamen Seeking 37 7 

Libraries for Seamen 47 6 

Life-Lines, Throwing 1 3 

Life in the Arctic 4 2 

Life-Saving Equipment 21 3 

Life-Saver, Wireless as a 22- 3 

Life of Henry Hudson 50 3 

Lighthouse, A Lightless 41 3 

Limitations of Education 50 9 

Lincoln, Abraham 21 

Lincoln, Centenary of * 21 6 

Living, Cost of and Wages, 1907 1 13 

Living, Cost of in India... 20 3 

Living in England 44 9 

Living, Cost of in England 51 10 

Log-Raft, Largest 40 5 

London, Facts About 3 10 

London Ivory Sale 9 11 

Longest Passage on Record, China-Pu- 

get Sound 32 5 

Longest Passage on Record, Europe-Pu- 

get Sound 34 5 

Los Angeles, Recall Election in 30 13 

Lower Vessel-Tax, To 26 11 

Luxury on Shipboard 30 3 

Lynchings, Number of in United States.. 39 13 

M 

Magellan, Wireless in Straits of 24 12 

Maguire for Congress 1 6 

Maguire, Sailors Support 2 6 

Maine, Against Raising the 38 3 

Manning Question Ignored 25 6 

Manning Scale, British 41-2; 49-6 

Manufacturers, Hostility of 49 1 

Market, American Home 5 11 

Marooned (By "El Tuerto") 2 

Massachusetts, Gilded Cod of 33 3 

Masterpiece, Foster's 46 1 

McCraith, Augustin, Death of 35 15 

McKee's Rock, Conditions at 52 8 

Measurement of Tides 34 9 

Messina, Earthquake at.... 16 14 

Mexican Industrial Education 12 8 

Mexicans in United States 14 8 

Mexico, Revolt Spreads in 44 11 

Migration to Siberia 22 10 

Miners' Death Rate 4 13 

Mines, Coal, Accidents in 4 13 

Missing Ships 21 11 

Mixture of Kindred Races 34 10 



Title No. Page 

"Model License League" 30 6 

Modern Berlin 41 11 

Molders' Jubilee, The 44 6 

Morris, Max, Death of 41 15 

Mortality From Consumption 32 10 

Motor Boats, Scottish 7 11 

Motor Boats on the Dead Sea 19 11 

M. Ps., Trade-Union 33 10 

Music of Atlantis 36 10 

Murders in Chicago 16 13 

Music, the Sea and 12 8 

"Mutiny," the Terrors of ?5 7 

N 

Naval Warfare, Laws of 29 3 

Naval Revolution in Sight 33 11 

Naval Boomerang, England's 37 11 

Navy, Training in the 2 11 

Navy Yard Shipbuilding 12 6 

Navy, United States Second in Strength. . 

16-12; 44-12 

Navy, United States, Appropriations 21 12 

Navy, Red Tape in 33 3 

Navigation Report 22 6 

Nebraska, Vote for Taft and Bryan 12 14 

News Still Traveling 50 7 

New South Wales, Trade-Unions in 15 14 

New York, Indebtedness of 20 2 

New York, Population of 25 13 

New York, Growth of 36 10 

Nobel Prize Awards 20 3 

No Criminals Wanted 37 6 

Non-Magnetic Vessel, A 30 3 

North German Lloyd Line, Profits of.... 29 14 

North Pole Discovered by Dr. Cook 51 13 

North Pole Discovered by Commander 

Peary 52 13 

Norway and Her Seamen 40 7 

Norwegian Seamen's Union 14 8 

Norwegian Seamen's Reform 43 6 

Norwegian Liberals Take Note 45 6 

Not Easily Amended 33 11 

O 

Obelisk Boat, Passing of 8 3 

Obsolete Laws 44 2 

Ohio, Heroes of the 51 7, 8 

Old Wreck Located 27 2 

Old Lie Rehashed 10 6 

Old Clippers Sold 14 5 

Old-Age Pensions, British 16 3 

Old-Age Pensions in Ireland 20 4 

Old-Age, Provision for 44 9 

£1000 Reward (By "El Tuerto") 12 2 

"Open Shop," Dooley on the 40 3 

Ore, Shipments of 30 3 

Oriental Burial Customs 17 10 

Origin of Boycott 28 10 

Our Undemocratic Capital 46 9 

P-Q 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Report 

of _ 38 5 

Pacific Mail and "Wireless" 49 7 

Pacific Mail Company, Furuseth's Suit 

Against 50 5 

Painters' Wages in Australia 38 12 

Panama Canal, Appropriations for 7 14 

Panama, Rivals of 13 3 

Panama Canal, Work on 13-13; 18-3 

Panama Canal, Total Expenditures on... 34 14 

Panama Canal, Dimensions of 36 3 

Panama, Reparation to Seamen by 51 14 

P. and O. Losing to Japan 5 11 

Paris, Working Girls of 20 11 

Paris Postal Employes Strike 30 4 

Partnership Between Employers and Em- 
ployes 7-4; 8-4 

Passages, Record Long 5 3 

Passage, Longest on Record, China-Pu- 

get Sound 32 5 

Passage, Longest on Record, Europe-Pu- 

get Sound 34 5 

Passages, Some Smart 47 3 

Passing of Obelisk Boat 8 3 

Passing of Van Cleave 41 2 

Patients, For Trachoma 39 6 

Pauperism in England 41 10 

Pay-Check Evil, The 43 6 

Pay-Checks, To Abolish 44 7 

Paying Too Much for Success 32 2 

Peking, Census of 23 11 

Peking, Old and New 44 2 

Pensions for Widows 5 2 

Pension System, Growth of 20 11 

Pension System, Railroad 46 11 

Peoples, Transportation of 36 9 

Peril of the Iceberg 51 3 

Peru, Japs Emigrating to 29 10 

Philippines, Seamen's Strike in 14 14 

Picketing, Peaceful, Upheld 19 11 

Piracy in the Pacific 51 

Plimsoll Mark, Foreign Ships Must Carry 44 14 

Polar Seas, Crossing the 12 3 

Political Levies, Trade-Union, Prohibited 14 14 

Port of Durban 4 2 

Port, New Canadian 21 11 

Port, World's Greatest 22 

Port of Calcutta 30 10 

Port of Hamburg 33 3 

Population, Chicago's 2-14; 50-13 

Population of Germany 16 11 

Population, China's Composite 18 10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-TWO. 



Title No. Pag< 

Population of San Francisco 18 13 

Population of Cuba 25 12 

ilation of New York 25 13 

Population, Chinese J8 11 

Population and Immigration 45 3 

Population of Great Britain 46-4; 51-11 

.:.-. Reduced Rate of 4 14 

Postage, International. United State-. 

( iermany 19 13 

Postal Union, French, Dissolved 47 15 

Postoffice, British 56 1" 

Power, A Source of 5 10 

Press, A Free 19 3 

Prices, Retail, of Food, 1907 2 13 

Principle of the Boycott IK 2 

Printers' Wages, Queensland 48 4 

Printing Invention, Australia 20 3 

Problems of Labor (By Joseph Treu)... 35 3 

Products From Sea Grass 32 3 

Profit-Sharing in England 49 3 

Prohibition, Absinthe 3 11 

Promotion of Genius. For the 30 11 

Prosperity Rights, Taft and 34 11 

"Property" Vs. Health 50 6 

Protest Heeded. Vesselowners 27 11 

Provision for Old-Age 44 9 

Purchasing Power of Wages, 1907 1 13 

Quebec, the French in 37 11 

R 

Races, Mixture of Kindred 34 10 

Race Between Irmgard and Coronado... 27 5 

Race Question, Labor Question 41 6 

Railroadmen, Accident-- to British 9 4 

Railroad Accidents in United State- 9 14 

Railroad-. Earnings of 10 14 

Railroad Earnings, Union Pacific 15 13 

Railroad Pension System 46 11 

Railway Accidents, British 50 10 

Recall Election in Los Angeles 30 13 

Reciprocal Tax Repealed 48 3 

Record Passages — 

Alaska-San Francisco 6 5 

English Channel-Columbia River 9 5 

Liverpool-Quebec 11 12 

Liverpool-Quebec 18 12 

Manchester-Philadelphia 47 14 

Maiiretania-1 .u-itania 

21-12; 23-12; 29-14: 33 14; 35 14; 36-14; 

41-14; 43-14; 52 14 

New Caledonia-Norfolk 12 12 

New York-Galveston. 6 12 

Port Townsend-Honolulu 34 5 

San Francisco-Astoria 18 5 

Seattle-Victoria 43 5 

Seattle-San Francisco 31 5 

Seattle-San l'ranci-co 44 5 

Transatlantic Record- 44 3 

Yokohama- Victoria 44 5 

Record Long Passages 5 3 

Record of Boycott, Early 16 3 

Records. Transatlantic 44 3 

Red Tape in the Navy 33 3 

Reduced Diameter Compass 22 11 

Refugees, Aid to 32 7 

Relic- Tell of Tragedies 17 3 

Religion and "Business" 29 6 

Reminder- of the Past 47 7 

Reparation to Seamen by Panama 51 14 

Repeal Tonnage Tax, To 36 3 

Republic'- "Wireless," The 21 6 

Republic. South Africa A 34 11 

Revival in Shipbuilding 41 11 

Revolt Spread- in Mexico 44 11 

Revolution, Naval, in Sight 33 11 

Reward- for Saving Life at Sea 

9-12: 15 4; 16-5; 19-12: 25-14: 27-5; 41-14; 51 5 

Rb> de Janeiro nock- 15 3 

Rio Janeiro, Dwellings in 43 11 

Rivals of Panama 13 3 

Robins' Address on Labor 48 1 

Rockefeller's Fortune 49 13 

id, Kirhy the New 44 1 

Roosevelt on Labor 18 1 

Ruef. \be. Convicted 14 13 

Ruef. Abe. Sentenced 17 13 

Russian Labor Insurance 6 10 

Russia, Wages in 13 s 

Russian Executions and Sentence-. 1906.. 19 14 

"Russia, The Terror In" 51 6 

S 

Sabine Neches Canal 27 3 

Safety of Life at Sea 1-10; 24-3 

Safety of Life at Sea I Report of Com 

mission) 25 1 

Sailing Fleet, Tramp- Wipe Out 23 3 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Appeal to Legislature 19 1 

Governor Gillett's Veto 28 6 

Hammond Injunction, The 19 6 

Hammond Contempt Case 23 1 

Hammond Decision, The 23 6 

Hammond Company and the Union.... 38 1 

Hammond Company Squeals 38 6 

Hospital Bill Held Up 24 6 

•Letter to the Voters 6 7 

Maguire a Winner 6 6 

Marine Hospital, The 20 6 

Programme for the "Sixth" 24 6 

Ridiculous Yarn, A 46 6 

^lilor-' Union History 1 1 



Title No. Page 

Sailors Support Maguire 2 6 

Sailor-' Anniversary, The 24-1; 2? 7 

Seamen and Longshoremen 11 6 

Seamen's Bill in Legislature 17 6 

Slave Law. To Repeal 4 6 

DECEASED MEMBERS 

Anderson, Albert 15 7 

Andersen. Albert 51 7 

\ntonscn, lljalmar 44 7 

Beckmann, Albert A 50 7 

Behrens, Gustaf 46 7 

Bergenheim, Hagvin 22 7 

Bordette, Andrew 47 7 

Bore. Carl 3 7 

I!, irgeson, John 35 7 

Brien, Patrick 21 7 

Brighton, Joseph 24 7 

t larlsson, Carl 7 7 

Carlsen, Ole 19 7 

Chevis, Frank JO 7 

Christiansen. Carl 12 7 

Christiansen, John 15 7 

Cook. John 44 7 

Crosswell, James E 9 7 

I >ahlgren, Albin 46 7 

Doherty, Joseph 2^ 7 

Dougherty, Barney 16 7 

Ellefs, Andrew . . ." 28 7 

Finegan, Peter Joseph 2 7 

Foerg, Wilhelm 21 7 

Fredriksen, John 46 7 

Gallagher, William 17 7 

Goranson, Hans T 39 7 

Granlund, Johan August 48 7 

Gundersen, Martin 4 7 

Gundersen, Ktmt 30 7 

Gustafson, R. W 10 7 

Haakonsen, Bernard Olaf 35 7 

Hagstrom, Charles U 7 

Hammarin, Arvid Elias 10 7 

Hansen, Andrew 3 7 

Hansen, George Martin 31 7 

Hansen, Theodore Christian 50 7 

Hellberg, Gustav Wilhelm 30 7 

Henriksen, Hans 34 7 

Henrikson, Rudolph 44 7 

Herbert, William 50 7 

II off man. II. G 29 7 

Holz, Emil 25 7 

Hultgren, Charles 29 7 

Ingerman, Christopher 26 7 

Ivergaard, Anton 31 7 

Jacobsen, Ludwig H 14 7 

Janson, olaf 36 7 

Johansson, Anders • 4 7 

Johanson, Johannes 6 7 

Johannesen, Johannes 34 7 

Johnson, Joseph 2 7 

Karlson. Edwin 1 7 

Kollmann, John 12 7 

Korsman, Erick Napoleon 29 7 

Kranwall, Oscar Sartenus 33 7 

KufutS, Antonio 45 7 

Lang. George 19 7 

Larsen. Louis ] 7 

Larsson, Lars 9 7 

Larsen, Henry 11 7 

Larsen, Han- Jorgen 24 7 

Larsen, Axil l eonard 37 7 

Lee. Oscar Alfred 16 7 

Lendhard, William 23 7 

Linehan, William 21 7 

Lock wood, John X 11 7 

I .ong, James 18 7 

Lund. Albert 2 7 

Madison. Alfred 26 7 

Marker. Thorvald George 41 7 

Matti-ou, John 9 7 

Mattson, Emil 29 7 

McBeth. Quincy Ward 5 7 

MeCracken. James 23 7 

McLeod. J. A 27 7 

Mel eod, Angus 38 7 

McManus. Joe E 1 7 

"" 1 1 Hi-en. I Ian- 14 7 

Moriarity. John 19 7 

Murphy. John Joseph 32 7 

Newman, G 2 7 

Nielsen. Otto 2 7 

Nielsen, Christian 2 7 

Nil-en. John 2 7 

Nil sen, Sigurd 3 7 

Nil-en, Nicolai 23 7 

Nil-en. Michael O 49 7 

Noniclm. Alarik 43 7 

Nord, P 7 7 

Nordenssand. Wilhelm 23 7 

Nordstrom. Emil Bryniulf 17 7 

Norman. George 12 7 

Petersen. Ole Peter 3 7 

Peter-en, Peter 3 7 

Peter-on. fohan 3 7 

Petersen. Nil- Christian 5 7 

Peterson, Sven lulius 15 7 

Petersen. Harry E 32 7 

Petersen, Christian 39 7 

smussen. Marcus Chr id 7 

Rasmussen. Nil- Christian 45 7 

'■vine. Emil 44 7 

s.mbert. Emil Gustaf 48 7 

Schilling. George 32 7 

Simi. Malt 16 7 

Sion.-. Carl Oscar 12 7 

Steiner, Emil 32 7 

Sundberg. \ P 22 7 



Title No. Page 

Sundstrt 'in, John 14 7 

Thorsson, Knut 20 7 

Todter. Claus $5 7 

Tonnesen. Hans T 14 7 

Torgersen, Torger 15 7 

Torgersen, Olaf B 41 7 

Walker. Charles _ 45 7 

Waltonen, Gustaf 46 7 

Whitehall. Walter 2'> 7 

W'ik-trand. Sven 17 7 

Zacho, Kamborinus 14 7 

Salary Increased, Speaker's 20 13 

Salmon. Propagation of 5 11 

San Francisco, Tonnage in 2 5 

San Francisco, Harbor of 3 1 

San Francisco Harbor 5 2 

San Francisco, Tribute to 6 2 

San Francisco, Population of IS 13 

San Francisco, Mirth- and Deaths in 26 13 

S.m Francisco a Wonder 38 11 

San Francisco, Tuberculosis in 50 1 

San Francisco Magic 50 2 

San Francisco, The Case of ^>2 1 

San Pedro Annexed to l.o- Angeles 48 5 

Saving Life at Sea, Reward- for 

.9 12; 15-4; 16-5; 19-12; 25-14; 27-5; 41-14; 51-5 

Savings- Bank Insurance 8 3 

Savings Clubs, Workingmen's U 9 

"Scab," Definition of 39 9 

Schools of Germany. Public 14 8 

School-, Dental Treatment in 15 3 

Schooner. Largest Modern 13 12 

Scotland'- Healthy Climate 48 11 

Scotch Vital Statistics 6 3 

Scotti-h Motor Boats 11 

Scrap Heap. Greyhounds to the 17 10 

Scurvy Ship, The (By "El Tuerto") 4? 2 

Safety of Life at 1 10 

Sea-. The Sink of the 11 3 

Sea and Music. The 12 8 

'earing the. of Derelict- 18 3 

Sea. Di-appeared at 21 11 

Sea, Safety of Life at 24 3 

Sea (Ira--. Products from 32 3 

Sea Shanties (By "LI Tuerto") 40-1; 40-6 

Sea. Sending Criminal- to 41 6 

Seamen on Manning 2 1 

Seamen Under the Law 7 6 

Seamen's Friends Are "Neutral" 9 6 

Seamen'- Union, Norwegian 14 8 

Seamen'- Strike in Philippines 14 14 

Seaman'- Wages Restored 2'> 6 

Seamen'- Bill (Washington) Signed 29 6 

Seamen Seeking Liberty 37 7 

Seamen, Norway and Her 49 7 

Seamen. Contract for Care of Sick 42 14 

Seamen's Reform. Norwegian 43 6 

Seamen'- Convention. German 44 10 

Seamen'- Union, Italian 44 10 

Seaman Denied Citizenship 44 14 

Seamen, Libraries for 47 6 

Seamen. Swedish Winning 47 6 

Seamen- Strike. French 47 11 

Seamen, Reparation to by Panama 51 14 

Seamen's Laws — 

Germany 7 

I >enmark 27 1 

Norway 29 1 

Sweden $1 > 1 

Austria 31 1 

Italy 32 1 

( rreece J3 1 

Russia >4 1 

Spain '4 1 

Japan 55 1 

Netherlands 35 1 

France 3b-!; 37 1 

Synopsis 47 1 

Seaport. Ghent a 2 10 

Seaport, A Great Dutch 19 10 

Seaport-. "Liberality" in 48 6 

Seaweed for Mattre-- Making 19 2 

Seaweed as a Fertilizer 38 3 

Seaweed a- Food 44 10 

Second City of the I'm] lire 11 11 

Sending Criminal- to Sea 41 6 

Ship, Builder- of the 12 7 

Ship-. Missing 21 11 

Ship Sub-iily Pill 27 6 

Ship-. I 1 . ime of Ancient 31 3 

Ship. Gas-Driven 41 10 

Ship-. Steering of 42 8 

Shea. Cornelius P.. Imprisonment of... 45 6 

Sherman'- "Sheds" ^2 8 

Shipboard. Luxury on 30 3 

Shipboard. Discipline on ' : 3 

Shipbuilding Slump, Briti-h '■ 11 

Shipbuilding, Navy Yard 12 6 

Shipbuilding, Canadian 2"' 11 

Shipbuilding in Germany 36 7 

Shipbuilding. Revival in 41 11 

Shipmaster. The Haunted 56 6 

Shipments of Ore 30 2 

Shipowner- Oppose Bond- 3 6 

Shipowners' Combine JO 11 

Shipping, British ° 11 

Shipping Insurance Gambling 12 10 

Shipping, World'- 13 8 

Shipping Laws, Congress and Jo 2 

Shipping Tonnage of the World 47 14 

Shipyard. A Great 14 3 

Should Stay on Present Site -4 6 

Siberia. Around the Wor'd via 29 11 

Siberia. Migration to 22 10 

Siberian Immigration 43 11 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-TWO. 



Title No. Page 

Sink of the Seas, The 11 3 

Slavery in the United States 36 6 

Smart Passages, Some 47 3 

Sound, Strange Aberrations of 16 3 

Source of Power, A 5 10 

South Africa a Republic 34 11 

South Pole, Shackelton's Expedition .... 28 12 

South Pole, Search for 39 3 

Spitting Breeds Tuberculosis 42 9 

Standard of Efficiency 33 7 

Standard of Skill for Crews 34 7 

State "Desertion" Laws 26 6 

Steamers. Changes in 24 11 

Steamship, Development of the 39 3 

St. Mary's, Traffic Through 4 8 

Storms, "Equinoctial" 4 3 

Story, Strange, Hinted At 37 3 

Straits of Dover, Airship Crosses 47 12 

Street-Carmen's Wages, Sydney, N. S. W. 17 4 

Street-Carmen's Wages in Brisbane 49 4 

Strike, Doctors', in Switzerland 1 4 

Strike Declared, Hatters' 18 IS 

Strike, The Hatters' 19 7 

Strike of Paris Postal Employes 30 4 

Strikes, Labor Council Calls 31 11 

Strike, The French 35 6 

Strike. French Seamen's 47 11 

Strike, Swedish, Inaugurated 48 4 

Striking, Sent to Jail for 18 11 

Subsidies for German Shipping 6 2 

Subsidies. Furuseth on 49 6 

Success, Paying Too Much for 32 2 

Suez Canal Prosperous 12 3 

Suez Canal Traffic 14 8 

Sun, Land of the Midnight 25 2 

Surgeon, The Hangman as 29 10 

Surpassing Himalayas, The 30 11 

Susquehanna River, Taming the 28 11 

Sweden, Industry in 20 9 

Swedish Seamen Winning 47 6 

Swedish Strike Inaugurated 48 4 

Swedish Strikers' Appeal 52 6 

T 

Taft's Inaugural 25 6 

Taf t and Property Rights 34 11 

Taming the Susquehanna River 28 11 

Tax Repealed, Reciprocal 48 3 

Teheran, Earthquake at 23 14 

Tenements in Germany 27 10 

Terrors of "Mutiny," The 35 7 

"Terror in Russia," The 51 6 

The Boatswain (Poem by "El Tuerto") . . 31 11 

The Farmer (Poem by "El Tuerto") 27 10 

Throwing Life-Lines 1 3 

Tides, Measurement of.....' 34 9 

Tobacco Monopoly, French 15 4 

Tobacco, Famous Devotees of 24 10 

Tonnage in San Francisco 2 5 

Tonnage Tax, To Repeal 36 3 

Tows, Protest Against Long 12 3 

Trachoma Patients, For 39 6 

Trade-Union Acts 4 11 

Trade-Unions, International 7 11 

Trade-Union Congress, British 8 2 

Trade-Unions in Italy 14 14 

Trade-Union Political Levies Prohibited. 14 14 

Trade-Unions in New South Wales 15 14 

Trade-Union Funds 18 6 

Trade-Union, Largest in the World 20 4 

Trade-Union, Accounts of 31 10 

Trade-Union M. P.'s 33 10 

Trade-Unions, British, Benefits Paid by.. 39 4 
Trade-Unions, British, Membership and 

Funds 37 4 

Trade-Union Commandments 41 8 

Trade-Unions in Great Britain 44 4 

Trade-Unions in France 50 4 

Trade Mark, Union Label Not a 2 4 

Trade Disputes Act 4 10 

Trade of Bremen 35 11 

Traffic on the Elbe 1 3 

Traffic Through St. Mary's 4 8 

Traffic, Suez Canal 14 8 

Tragedies, Relics Tell of 17 3 

Training in the Navy 2 11 

Tramps Wipe Out Sailing Fleet 23 3 

Transpacific Lines 35 2 

Transportation of Peoples..! 36 9 

Tribute to San Francisco 6 2 

Trusts in Germany 3 10 

Trust, A Free-Trade 5 10 

Tuberculosis, Cure for 8 13 

Tuberculosis, Its Cure 33 2 

Tuberculosis, War on 33 6 

Tuberculosis, Spitting Breeds 42 9 

Tuberculosis in San Francisco 50 1 

Tuberculosis, Against 52 11 

Turkey, Constitutional Government in... 14 4 

Turkey, Abdul Hamid II Deposed 33 12 

Turkish Workers, Wages of 14 8 

'Twixt Scylla and Charybdis (By "El 

Tuerto") 34 2 

U-V 

Unemployed Insurance 3 2 

Unemployed in British Cities 5-4; 6-4 

Unemployed, Employment for 5 11 

Unemployed in Berlin 12 4 

Unemployed in England 19 4 

Unemployed in Belgium 19 4 

Unemployed, The British 19 11 

Unemployed in Great Britain 22-2; 33-4 

Unemployed in England 34 10 

Unemployed in Denmark 49 11 

Unions, Canadian Labor 6 2 

Unions, Why Some Fail 20 1 



Title 



No. Page 



Union Printers' Home 31 11 

Union, French Postal, Dissolved. . . 47 15 

Union Label Not a Trade Mark 2 4 

Union Label, Garment Workers' 27 7 

Union Label, "Billy" Sunday on 37 3 

Unionism Humanitarian 33 7 

United States, Mexicans in 14 8 

United States Government, Appropria- 
tions for 15 13 

United States, Vessel Losses in 16 12 

United States Navy Second in Strength 

16-12; 44-12 

United States, Immigration to, 1908 20 15 

United States, Slavery in the 36 

United States, Number of Lynchings in.. 39 

Union Pacific Railroad Earnings 15 

Unsinkable Warships 48 

Valparaiso, Harbor of 12 

Van Cleave Is Happy 19 

Van Cleave, Passing of 41 

Vessels Lost 14 

Vessel Losses in United States 16 

Vessel-Tax, To Lower 26 

Vesselowners' Protest Heeded 27 

Vessel, A Non-Magnetic 30 

Vital Statistics, Scotch 6 



W 

Wages and Cost of Living, 1907 1 13 

Wages, Purchasing Power of, 1907 1 13 

Wages in Russia 13 8 

Wages, Danish Millers' 13 8 

Wages of Turkish Workers 14 8 

Wages, Street-Carmen's, Sydney, N. S. W. 17 4 

Wages, Jute Workers' 18 3 

Wage Earnings, Charity and 33 10 

Wages, Highest and Lowest in France.. . 35 4 

Wages, Painters', in Australia 38 12 

Wages, Queensland Printers' 48 4 

Warfare, Laws of Naval 29 3 

Warships. Unsinkable 48 10 

War on Tuberculosis 33 6 

Watch-and-Watch (Poem by "El Tu- 
erto") 44 11 

Waterways of France 32 10 

Waterways, Canada's Internal 42 9 

Welland Canal 3 11 

Whalers Ousted, American 12 3 

Whaling Enterprise, African 3 11 

Whaling, Modern Mode of 36 3 

White Plague, Cost of the 6 10 

"White Slaves" Sold at Auction 22 4 

"White Slaves" at Auction 23 6 

Why Some Unions Fail 20 1 

Widows, Pensions for 5 2 

Wireless, Record for Distance 5 14 

"Wireless," The Republic's 21 6 

Wireless as a Life-Saver 22 3 

Wireless in Straits of Magellan 24 12 

"Wireless," Pacific Mail and 49 7 

Wonder, San Francisco a 38 11 

Workday. I ron Trades 12 6 

Workers in Cotton Factories 9 10 

Working Girls of Paris 20 11 

W nrkingmen, German Care for 20 10 

Workingmen's Savings Clubs 34 9 

Workingman, What He Wants 43 2 

Workingmen's Homes in Genoa 13 8 

World's Shipping 13 8 

World's Greatest Port 22 3 

World, Shipping Tonnage of the 47 14 

Worship, Bench 29 11 

Wrecks — 

Acapulco 33 5 

Adato 20-12; 28-5 

Adelia Shores 34-14; 35-14; 36-9 

Advance 16 14 

Aeon 1-5; 2-5; 3-5; 4-5; 5-5; 11-5 

Aleida 16 5 

Alice 18-5; 19-5 

Alice Marie 4 5 

America 23 14 

Anglo-African 20-12; 48-14; 50-14 

Annie Bliss 51 14 

Archimedes 9 13 

Auckland 26 12 

Australian 24-12; 39-5; 43-5; 49-5 

Aurora 13 12 

Bandon 51 5 

Beulah McCabe 5 12 

Brodick Castle 41-5; 43-5 

Carnmarth 37 12 

Cecil 20 5 

Charles S. Hirsch 8 12 

Charles E. Falk 29 5 

Charles Hanson 43 5 

Clan Ronald 21 14 

Cleopatra 28 14 

Colombia 50 12 

Columbia 37-5; 38-5; 40-5; 48-5 

Condor 39 5 

Daghestan 15 12 

Dyffryn Manor 42 5 

D. M. Clemson 13-12; 14-12 

Eaton Hall 4 7 

Eagle • 34 14 

Eber Ward 32 14 

Eden 12 12 

Edith 32 5 

Elvira Ball 34-14; 40-14; 42-14; 44-14 

Emma Knowlton 45 14 

Ensign 19-5; 51-5 

Eva 42 12 

Eva H. Lewis 31-14; 33-14 

Falls of Halladale 14 5 

Fidra 21 12 

Fifeshire 6 5 



Title No. Page 

Finance 11 12 

Flora Rogers 8 12 

Fort George 39 5 

Fox 4 12 

Frank Bomet 9-12; 10-3 

Fred Swain 49 14 

Galena 16 5 

George Sturgess 8 12 

George Nester 36 8 

Granada 3 12 

Grayling 42-5; 43-5 

Gotama 16-5 ; 17-5 

Hallidale 11 5 

Helena 22 12 

Henry Clausen, Jr 13 12 

Herzogin Cecelie 46 5 

Hiram Bingham 50 14 

H. M. Whitney 9 12 

Ida Watts 18 5 

Indiana 30-5; 33-5; 40-5 

Ingul 41 12 

Irada 15 4 

Iroquois 6 5 

Ivy 1 5 

Jeanie Lippitt 16 12 

Jennie Thomas 16 12 

Jennie French Potter 38 14 

Jessie L. Smith 27 14 

John F. Miller 2 7 

John A. Matheson 2-12; 3-3; 6-12 

John M. Brown 12 12 

Joseph L. Eviston 6 5 

Joseph 1 lammond 50 14 

Juanita 6 12 

Jules Henry 29 12 

Kearsarge 28 14 

Kenosha 28 9 

Kirkdale 15 5 

Lakeside 33 14 

Lambert 6 12 

Laura Victoria 15 12 

Laurentian 52 14 

Loch F-inlas 2 15 

Loch Lomond 10 5 

Lolita A :.... 17 12 

Luarca 31 14 

Lucania 52 14 

Lindholman 14 4 

l.ulie N. Pollard 8-12; 10-12 

Lyman M. Law 14 12 

Mahretta 32 12 

Maori 47-12; 49-12 

Marconi 28 5 

Margretha 27 12 

Marie F. Cummings 12 12 

Mary Sanford 27-14; 29-3 

Mayflower 8 12 

Miles M. Merry 24 14 

Minnie E. Kelton 21 5 

Modoc 17 12 

Myrtle 49 14 

Nezinscot 48 14 

Nipponia 5 13 

Nora Wiggins 6 12 

Oakland 31 12 

Ohio 51-5; 52-5 

Oil Barge No. 10 14 12 

Olga 29 5 

Orinoco 49 14 

Orleans 46 5 

Pascal P. Pratt 11 8 

Penguin 22-14; 24-12 

Pomona 4 5 

Prefontaine 45 14 

Prodigal 19 12 

Qualite 52 12 

Quick Time 16 12 

Rainbow 43 5 

R. D. Inman 28-5; 30-5; 32-5 

Republic 21 12 

Richard Paul 31 12 

Roderick Dhu 33-5; 35-5 

Roxana 45 14 

Sappho 41 12 

Sarah D. Fell 23 3 

Sarah W. Lawrence 23-12; 24-3 

Sardinia 12 13 

Satoslav 17 14 

Sea Lion 40 5 

Seven Sisters 4 5 

Shearwater 50 14 

Simla 4 5 

Sirocco 6 12 

Slavonia 39 14 

Soquel 20 5 

Star of Bengal 3-5; 4-5; 17-5; 32-5; 40-5 

Steed 21 14 

Stork 16 12 

Sybil Marston 18-5; 19-5; 26-5; 49-5 

Tonawanda 42 5 

Velasquez 5 5 

Volund 4 12 

Waratah 49-12; 50-12 

Warner Moore 16-12; 17-12 

William H. Tanner 28-14; 36-14 

William V Larmond 17-12; 44-14 

Winnebago 48 5 

W. W. McLauchlan 38 14 

Yarmouth 9 13 

Yosemite 44 5 

Yoseric 44 5 

Wreck Located, Old 27 2 

Wrecks, Atlantic Coast 29 3 

X-Y-Z 

Yachts, Foreign-Built 47 3 

Yellow River, Control of the 44 2 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 








VOL. XXII, No. 1. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1908. 


Whole No. 1083. 


i 



SAILORS' UNION HISTORY. 



AMONG the most profitable uses of Labor 
Day is the opportunity afforded for the 
study of labor history in detail. Every 
labor organization presents in its own experience 
some lesson of value to the labor movement at 
large, not least valuable among which is the les- 
son of encouragement derived from the triumph 
of those bodies which, having their beginnings 
in conditions of great oppression, have overcome 
all obstacles and grown strong in proportion to 
the severity of their early struggles. The history 
of the labor movement presents no more striking 
instance of this kind than that of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific. The following brief sketch 
of the Sailors' Union, although dealing almost 
exclusively with a single phase of its work, name- 
ly, the effort to improve the laws relating to sea- 
men, will be of interest and instruction to seamen 
and the general reader by reason of the lesson it 
presents of the possibilities of organization, even 
among those classes of labor commonly regarded 
as hopeless, so far as their own powers are con- 
cerned. 

The Sailors' Union of the Pacific was organized 
at San Francisco on March 6, 1885. 

It was said of a certain statesman of recent 
times that he could make a budget read like a 
romance. Some such power — the power to make 
plain facts appeal to the imagination — is needed 
to make the facts of organization among the 
seamen on the Pacific Coast read like the wonder- 
ful story it is, a story of hopes realized, of dreams 
come true, a story which, probably more than 
any other in the wide range of the world's labor 
movement, points the moral and adorns the tale 
of man's unending struggle for justice. 

It is one thing to describe the conditions of the 
seamen and to contrast these conditions with 
those obtained by the power of organization; it is 
quite another thing to grasp and, as it were, ma- 
terialize, the spirit that animated the organiza- 
tion and of which the improvement in condi- 
tions is but a partial, and, indeed, a vague and in- 
coherent expression. 

The writer or reader of the history of organi- 
zation among the seamen of the Pacific Coast 
must go back in spirit to that period "when the 
world was young" and the great oceans lay be- 
tween the scattered races of mankind, inviting 
the strong and repelling the weak, when honor, 
fame and wealth were the lot of these who "went 
down to the sea in ships and did business on the 
great waters." The seaman of that ancient time 
was a leader among his fellows. His was the 
proud distinction of equality in the social, and 
superiority in the industrial field. 

In an age in which the path of progress and 
civilization was blazed by the sword, the seaman, 
by virtue of his command over that element 
which, even to this day, has been the most po- 
tent field of military exploit, was rightly esteemed 
as the equal of those engaged in any sphere of 
activity. At a time when labor was universally 
regarded as a condition of servitude to which men 
were condemned by the misfortune of birth or of 



war, the seaman enjoyed the rights and privi- 
leges of a freeman. 

In the intervening period the relative position 
of seaman and landsman has been changed — in 
fact reversed. The sea has retained and indeed 
increased its importance, both in the commercial 
and in the military sense, but the seaman has lost 
the advantages which he formerly enjoyed in 
comparison with his fellows on land. 

With the passage of time and the softening in- 
fluences of civilization, the land workers have out- 
stripped the seamen in the improvement of the 
conditions of labor in respect both to the purely 
economic and to the legal aspect of these condi- 
tions. The loss suffered by the seaman has been 
not only relative but positive; not only has he 
failed to maintain his original position as chief 
among the world's workers, but he has suffered 
the imposition of disabilities, social, industrial and 
legal, which were known only among landfarers 
in early times. It is as though in the race for 
liberty «and equality among men the landsman, 
having caught up with the seaman, had cast the 
burden of his remaining disabilities upon the 
shoulders of the latter. 

To re-establish his profession in its rightful 
place among the world's arts and crafts; to re- 
establish himself in his rightful place among the 
world's citizenship; to secure for himself that 
material compensation to which he is entitled in 
a just appraisement of industrial or labor values, 
and, while keeping these objects in view, to in- 
crease his capacity for service in the cause of all 
other classes of labor — these are the objects and 
this the spirit for which and in which the sea- 
men of the Pacific Coast were organized twenty- 
three years ago. 

Only by a true appreciation of the standard of 
measurement thus established, and only by a full 
participation in the spirit by which the seamen 
have been inspired can the work of the seamen's 
unions be estimated at its real worth. Lacking 
these essentials, the history of that work becomes 
merely so much "fact and figure," a history in- 
telligible, it may be, to cold reason, but affording 
neither stimulus to the heart nor comfort to the 
soul. 

When first established, in 1885, the seamen's or- 
ganization was named the Coast Seamen's Union 
and its membership was confined to the men em- 
ployed on sailing vessels. Shortly afterward a 
union was formed among the men employed on 
steam vessels, this body being known as the 
Steamship Sailors' Protective Association. In 
1891, these two bodies combined and adopted the 
present title of Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 

Having been brought into existence by the pres- 
sure of conditions common to the seaman's life' 
in all parts of the world, the Union immediately 
attacked these conditions with a view to their 
prompt and complete extermination. Within a 
very brief period the Union had met and grap- 
pled with every phase of the situation confront- 
ing it, with the courage of hope and the enthu- 
siasm of youth. The seamen learned, at the ex- 
• pense of many hard knocks, that courage and en- 
thusiasm do not alone suffice in a contest with 
wrongs so old as to have become, in a manner 
of speaking, the "vested rights" of those who per- 
petrate them. Time and again the Union was 
thrown back upon its last line of defense, ex- 
hausted and well-nigh disrupted — but not discour- 



aged — in the struggle with an enemy entrenched 
behind the bulwarks of custom, aided by the 
machinery of the law and emboldened by the 
mistaken sympathy of press and public opinion. 

After years of varying fortune, or rather mis- 
fortune, in the effort to improve conditions by 
direct means, the Union turned its attention to- 
ward securing an improvement in the laws gov- 
erning seamen. The chief obstacles to reform in 
the seaman's life may be briefly described^by the 
terms imprisonment for desertion (i. e., for leav- 
ing a vessel before the expiration of the term for 
which the seaman had been engaged), the allot- 
ment system (signing away wages to the crimp 
or boarding-master), and the holding of the sea- 
man's clothing for debt alleged to be due the 
crimp or boarding-master. The conditions here 
described were each created and maintained by 
the maritime laws of the country and were in 
keeping with the maritime laws of all nations. 

It will be seen that these conditions rendered 
the seaman practically helpless in his own behalf. 
The law of imprisonment for desertion tied the 
seaman to his vessel as effectually as the slave 
laws bound the negro to the soil of his master. 
The allotment system was so operated as to com- 
pel the seaman to sign away a considerable por- 
tion of the wages about to be earned, as the only 
alternative of idleness, while the law under which 
the crimp could hold a seaman's clothing for debt 
increased the power of the former to compel the 
acceptance of such terms as he might offer. Prac- 
tically, therefore, the seaman lived in a state of 
bondage either to the ship or to the crimp. 

The Union' in 1892 appointed a committee to 
draft amendments to the maritime law. This 
being done, a bill embodying these amendments 
was presented in Congress by the Hon. James G. 
Maguire, who was then the Representative in 
Congress from the Fourth Congressional District 
of California. 

After much discussion, during which the ship- 
ping and commercial interests opposed the meas- 
ure with all the force at their command, the bill 
was passed in 1895. The law thus placed upon 
the National statutes has since been known as 
the Maguire Act. Thus the seamen secured their 
freedom from those legal pains and penalties 
which had theretofore kept them in a condition 
of complete subservience either to their employ- 
ers or to those classes which lived and prospered 
by preying upon them. 

The main features of the Maguire Act applied 
only to the seamen in the coastwise trade. In 
1898 the White Act passed Congress, thus extend- 
ing the provisions of the first-named law to the 
seamen engaged in the foreign-going, as well as 
in the coastwise trade. The passage of these two 
measures, besides greatly ameliorating the minor 
hardships of I lie seaman's life, accomplished his 
entire liberation in the matter of the disposition 
of his person, wages and personal belongings. 
In these essential respects the seaman, for the first 
time in many years, indeed centuries, was placed 
upon a plane of equality with his fellows on land. 
The seaman -had achieved his freedom under the 
law, thus making it possible for him to secure 
other improvements in his lot by negotiation be- 
tween the Union and the shipowners. 

From the day of its establishment the Sailors' 
Union has recognized and practiced the principle 
of federation among the organizations of labor in 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



all crafts. In 1885 the Union, while yet in its 
swaddling clothes, took part in the formation of 
the San Francisco Labor Council (then known 
as the Council of Federated Trades), and it has 
been affiliated with that body ever since. It is 
also affiliated with the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor, and, through its agencies at the 
various Coast ports, with like bodies in other 
States. 

The organization and federation of the entire 
seafaring craft of the United States has always 
been an object of prime consideration with the 
Union. In 1892 the International Seamen's Union 
of America was formed by the three unions of 
seamen then existing in the United States, the 
Lake Seamen's Union. Atlantic Coast Seamen's 
Union and Sailors' Union of the Pacific. In the 
intervening period the work of organizing has 
been pushed without intermission, so that now 
the Sailors' Union forms part of a chain of mari- 
time unions embracing sailors, firemen, cooks and 
stewards, bay and rivermen, fishermen — in short, 
"all hands" — in all the maritime localities of the 
country, the Atlantic Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, 
the Great Lakes and the Pacific Coast, including 
1 lawaii and Alaska. 

The Sailors' Union, through the International 
Seamen's Union, is affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor and the International Trans- 
port Workers' Federation, the latter a body of 
world-scope with headquarters in Europe. The 
principle of federation is carried still further 
through an arrangement with the Australasian 
Seamen's Union, under which that body and the 
Sailors' Union "exchange cards." that is, recog- 
nize and receive each other's members as they 
travel to and fro on the Pacific Ocean. 

Two years after its establishment, namely, in 
1887, the Union published an official organ, the 
Coast Seamen's Journal, which has been issued 
weekly ever since, carrying the message of good 
cheer to the seamen and all other classes of labor 
in all parts of the world. The Union pays Ship- 
wreck Benefit of $50, Death Benefit of $75 and 
Strike Benefit of $5 per week. 

Such, in brief, is the history of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, so far as the same may be 
communicated "in black and white." The rest 
must be left to the imagination of "those who 
know." 



ACCIDENT AND REST LAWS. 



The influence of the labor accident and 
weekly rest laws' in France has been di- 
versely interpreted as they affect the em- 
ployers and the workmen and also the pros- 
perity of the nation's industries. It is natural 
to infer that these laws are not identical in 
their application or consequences for all 
kinds of industries, and in order to under- 
stand their mode of working it is necessary 
to take a typical case — that of an industry 
with a working capital of $200,000, employ- 
ing 100 workmen per day. 

To determine the apparent charges falling 
on the employer by reason of this legisla- 
tion, it is necessary to consult the books of 
the accident insurance companies to ascer- 
tain the insurance rate for the different in- 
dustries. This rate varies, going as high as 
12 per cent, but an average of 4 per cent will 
meet the purposes of this report. It has been 
computed that for 100 workmen earning an 
average daily wage of 87 cents the insurance 
rate for one day will be $3.48, or for an in- 
dustry working 350 days, $1,218. These 
figures might appear exaggerated, but the in- 
surance companies affirm that they will be 
obliged to advance the rates still higher in 
order to meet their increased liabilities. 

The law requiring one day of rest out of 
seven is divided into two sections — that re- 
lating to industries authorized to apply the 
rest by rotation (roulement) and those not 
authorized to distribute over the week the 
day's rest. For the first, the law has affected 
industries by the fact that supplementary 
hands equal to one-seventh of the number of 
workmen have to be engaged, as well as ad- 
ditional foremen, in order to insure the nec- 
essary surveillance of the work. This bur- 
den would in reality have been slight if the 
men did not demand an increase of wages — 
obliged to be idle one day in seven, their 
weekly wage is, of course, diminished in the 
same proportion. 



Two solutions presented themselves to 
the employers in face of the demands of the 
men: (1) Raise of the wages one-seventh, 
that is to say, to the amount paid before 
the promulgation of the law, and reducing 
at the same time by one-seventh the num- 
ber of their workmen, and consequently the 
output; (2) maintaining the same output by 
taking on a supplementary force to replace 
the men at rest, and increasing thus the 
working expenses by one-seventh. In the 
majority of cases employers have chosen 
the latter solution by increasing the number 
of workmen and maintaining the usual out- 
put. 

Taking the average wage at 87 cents per 
day for each workman, the obligation of em- 
ploying an additional one-seventh of the 
working staff involves a daily expense of 
$12.43. 

In the industries not authorized to apply 
Sunday rest by rotation the effects of the 
new law have been met by a reduction of 
one-seventh in the output, or the general 
expenditures are increased as well as the 
material in order to attain the normal out- 
put before the application of the law. 

In addition to the aforementioned laws, 
which have taken effect, two others are en- 
gaging the attention of the legislative bodies 
— those which concern maladies resulting 
from their profession, and workmen's pen- 
sions. 

The first covers two classes of indemnities 
in case of sickness: 

(1) Compensation applying to the treat- 
ment of maladies resulting from certain 
trades, causing inability to work for thirty 
days; (2) compensation applying to the 
treatment of all maladies without distinction, 
including causes for inability to work not 
exceeding thirty days. The burden of the 
first proposition falls entirely on the em- 
ployer, while the workmen contribute to the 
second, the employers being responsible 
only for that portion of the risks resulting 
from the illness due to the profession, and 
the workmen supporting the charges result- 
ing from the ordinary sources of sickness. 
This bill being, so to speak, a corollary of 
the law on labor accidents, the charges 
would be at least doubled. 

For the industry in question (employing 
100 workmen) the charges would amount to 
8 per cent of the wages, or $6.96 per day, 
and for three hundred and fifty days, $2,436. 

The bill on workmen's pensions, now 
being examined by the Senate, is based on 
the triple obligation of the employer, the 
workman, and the State to contribute an- 
nually the necessary amounts to constitute 
for every workman or servant of thirty 
years' service and who has reached 60 years 
of age, a life pension of 360 francs ($69.48). 
The contribution of the employer is fixed at 
2 per cent, that of the workman at a similar 
amount, while the State makes up the differ- 
ence, so that the pension, after thirty years, 
reaches the fixed minimum of $69.48. The 
law provides for the capitalization, in the 
meantime, of these threefold contributions. 
The daily expenses for the employer (of 100 
employes) would be $1.74, or for three hun- 
dred and fifty days, $609. 

From the foregoing study it results that 
the total annual charges imposed by these 
labor laws may be divided up as follows:- 
Accidents, $1,216; weekly rest, $4,323; ill- 
ness. $2,436; pensions, $609; total, $8,584, or 
4.45 per cent of the capital invested. 



Of course the question arises whether the 
apparent loss in money and output is not 
compensated for by the gain in health, en- 
durance, and efficiency of the workers. 



GOVERNMENT BY INJUNCTION. 



All these efforts to make it appear that 
opposition to Government by Injunction is 
an assault upon legitimate judicial functions 
are childish. They cannot deceive many 
people at all, nor any very long. There are 
three principal points involved in the issue. 
One relates to the injunctive function. 
Legitimate injunctions are solely for the 
protection of rights in property. But they 
have been perverted by the courts to the 
purpose of regulating personal conduct with 
reference to bargaining for the hiring of 
workers. Inasmuch as there has been no 
legal property right in workers in this coun- 
try since the Thirteenth Amendment, there 
can be no basis for injunctions of that kind. 
Personal rights can neither be protected nor 
invaded by injunction without substituting 
judge-made law for the law of the land. A 
second point raised by this judicial novelty 
called "government by injunction," is the 
question of legislation. It is for the legis- 
lature, not for the courts, to prescribe what 
shall be lawful and what not. Yet labor in- 
junctions elaborately define offenses unrec- 
ognized by the statutes, actions that no leg- 
islature would dare to prohibit in statutory 
form, and forbid them under penalty of pun- 
ishment for contempt of court. The third 
point relates to the method and the effect of 
the proceedings for violation of labor in- 
junctions. Evidence of guilt is upon affi- 
davits prepared and sworn to in the offices 
of the lawyers for the party obtaining the 
injunction. There is no opportunity ac- 
corded the persons prosecuted to confront 
or cross-examine the witnesses as matter of 
right. The hearing is before a judge with- 
out a jury. The penalty is in the discretion 
of the judge. If the act charged be a crime, 
the conviction, however unjust, is no bar to 
a criminal prosecution. Nor does the pen- 
alty, however harsh, prevent the imposition 
of a second penalty for the same offense 
upon a criminal conviction. The question 
of notice of hearing is indeed important. In- 
junctions without notice are not only pre- 
judgments, but in labor cases they are prac- 
tically conclusive in their effect. Yet the 
question of notice is comparatively a minor 
one. The real questions raised by labor in- 
junctions are those noted above. All the 
safeguards of the law for the protection of 
innocence with reference to accusations of 
crime are violated ; the judiciary not only ad- 
judicates but legislates; and the emergent 
process of injunction is extended from the 
protection of property rights to the regula- 
tion of personal rights. — The Public, Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Vice-Consul James L. A. Burrell, of 
Magdeburg, states that the fourth and fully 
revised edition of the alphabetical list of the 
best known seaports of the world has just 
been published by the Prussian Statistical 
Bureau, under the direction of the Prussian 
.Minister of Commerce and Industry. The 
work contains the names of more than 13,000 
seaports, including the different names by 
which they are known, and the names of the 
countries, coasts, etc., where situated, as well 
as their latitude and longitude. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



1 


1 

On the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 




t^^* 


. , 







THROWING LIFE-LINES. 



The advisory subcommittee appointed by 
the British Government to formulate a report 
upon the question of British ships compul- 
sorily carrying life-line throwing apparatus 
conducted some most important experiments 
in Liverpool recently, the results of which 
are briefly described. 

The apparatus submitted comprised kites, 
buoys and different styles of guns and rockets. 
The first tests were those of West's drift 
buoys which were followed by the much- 
improved Regurk box kite. It was the opin- 
ion of those who witnessed the experiments 
that the kite is a successful invention and will 
be very serviceable when the wind is blowing 
on a lee shore. One of the most interesting of 
the tests was made with a balloon constructed 
of gold beater's skin in two weights. It car- 
ried a line for 1500 yards. The principal 
tests, however, were made with rockets, can- 
non and shoulder guns, which have been car- 
ried to a high state of perfection. Much in- 
terest was shown in the results of these tests, 
both by the committee and the nautical ex- 
perts. 

The cannon threw a line a distance of 310 
fathoms, which indicates the standard of ef- 
ficiency to which it has been brought. A pro- 
jectile is inserted in the cannon, and the 
cannon is fired by means of a friction tube 
which propels the projectile a certain distance, 
and from that point a rocket is discharged 
which carries the line to its destination. The 
gun is portable and is easily handled. An- 
other interesting feature is that during the 
daytime the smoke indicates the direction in 
which the line is carried, while at night the 
fire of the rocket denotes the direction. For 
shore use this gun can be placed on a small 
hand-barrow, and as there are no elaborate 
accessories, it can be readily worked by any 
person of ordinary intelligence. This gun is 
claimed to be the most satisfactory apparatus 
for heavy work as, for example, from the deck 
of large liners. 

Two shoulder guns impressed the experts 
as the most satisfactory of those produced. 
They are light, easily handled, and may be 
fired from any position by a man or boy. The 
more powerful of the two guns carried a line 
345 feet and the other 342 feet. 



CHINESE ON FRUITERS. 



ATLANTIC COAST NOTES. 



The situation on the Gulf still continues 
precarious. The Sailors and Firemen have 
reduced wages to try and meet the condi- 
tions, and we trust that an improvement 
will soon be visible. The Chinese still con- 
tinue to be a prominent factor in this dis- 
tressing time. The steamer that arrived in 
Boston on September 15 from Belfast, Ire- 
land, has a Chinese crew, and she is to be 
sent to the Gulf. We earnestly hope that 
after election conditions will be vastly im- 
proved, and business along the water front 
will be above the normal. 



Comrade William Hoffman, who lost all 
the fingers of his left hand by falling from 
a moving train, has received the Benefit 
Fund of $200. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Are Chinese to supplant American and 
other seamen in the crews on the steamers 
of the United Fruit Company? 

Such a story was current recently along 
the Boston water front soon after the ar- 
rival in port of the handsome new steamer 
Heredia of the company from Belfast, Ire- 
land, and it had become known that 43 mem- 
bers of her crew were Chinese. 

Manager I. C. Young of the company, 
when seen by a reporter and asked if there 
were any truth in the story, said : 

"There have been no changes in any of 
the old ships. None of the places of the old 
seamen have been filled with Chinese. It 
may be that there are a few Chinese on the 
Heredia. I understand that there are." 

"How about the new ships of the com- 
pany?" asked the reporter; "will they be 
manned by Chinese?" 

"I couldn't say as to that," replied Mr. 
Young. "But there will be no changes in 
the old ships. The Heredia is not to run 
from Boston. She will be sent south and 
will ply between New Orleans and Panama." 

Handsomely decked out with vari-colored 
bunting, the Heredia steamed up the harbor 
and anchored in the inner harbor, not far 
from the New England docks. She is 
painted white and is said to be one of the 
largest and most beautifully furnished fruit 
and passenger steamships in the world. She 
was given a noisy welcome by all the steam 
craft in the harbor, there being a tremendous 
chorus of steam whistles. 

The Heredia docked at Long wharf. 
Watchmen have been employed on the 
wharf to see that none of the 43 Chinese in 
the crew escape. 

Of the crew of the steamship Lillie of the 
same company, which arrived from Port An- 
tonio and was unloading a cargo of fruit 
at Long wharf, 14 are Chinese. 

The officers of the Heredia are nearly all 
recruited from other steamers of the com- 
pany and are well known in Boston. 



TRAFFIC ON THE ELBE. 



OFFICERS' FRAUDULENT PAPERS. 



C.omplaint has been made to the Natural- 
ization Bureau, in Washington, that a num- 
ber of officers in American steamers sailing 
to foreign ports are obtaining naturalization 
papers by fraud. It is presumed that an of- 
ficer hires a room in a certain city and 
though never living there, proves he has 
been a resident of that city for the preced- 
ing five years. The methods employed by 
some officers to obtain citizens papers are 
at least questionable. The only motive they 
can have is simply to secure a position as 
an officer in an American steamer. 

We sincerely hope that the Government 
officials will get at the root of the evil, as 
we know from experience that any union 
man who secures his papers can always fur- 
nish ample proof of the length of time he 
has been in the United States, and there- 
fore has nothing to fear when the ax falls. 



J. T. Verlander and Paul Heim have been 
sent to the Sanitarium in Fort Stanton, N. 
M., from the Marine Hospital in Chelsea, 
Mass. 



Although the traffic on the Elbe does not 
equal that on the Rhine, it nevertheless 
takes the second place in Germany and is of 
great economic importance. 

In earlier times the traffic was greatly im- 
peded by the duties levied by the states 
and cities situated on its shores, and at the 
beginning of the seventeenth century 48 
duties had to be paid between Melnik, Bo- 
hemia and Hamburg. The shipping was not 
entirely free of duty until 1870, and modern 
conditions. have only existed in the last few 
decades, as, besides the duties, the condition 
of the river in places was a serious hin- 
drance to navigation. It is interesting to 
note that in the thirties of the last century 
the boatmen carried small metal hand 
dredges with them, so that they might not 
stick fast in the sand. A really successful 
canalization of the stream was brought 
about by the Prussian Elbstromverwaltung, 
which was established in 1867. There are 
now ships plying on the Elbe with a tonnage 
as high as 1,200. 

The navigation here is a typical example 
of the modern tendencies toward consolida- 
tion and trust formation. Nearly all the 
traffic is now in the hands of the United 
Elbe Navigation Companies (Vereinigte 
Elbschifffahrtsgesellschaften), which have 
closed a contract with the other lines until 
1916. 

With respect to the goods shipped from 
Madgeburg, the greater quantity goes down- 
stream and consists principally of sugar, fer- 
tilizer salts, wrought iron, etc. Upstream 
are shipped very small quantities of sugar 
and wheat. On the other hand, the quan- 
tity of goods coming upstream to Madge- 
burg is much greater than that coming down 
to this city. 

The goods coming downstream are prin- 
cipally Bohemian brown coal and wood. 
Madgeburg annually uses about 200,000 tons 
of Bohemian brown coal and a much smaller 
quantity of German coal. The principal ar- 
ticles arriving from below are flour and 
other mill products, oats, barley and oil 
seeds. Hard coal also comes upstream, a 
great deal being shipped from England re- 
cently ; also saltpeter and wood. American 
petroleum comes in tank steamers upstream 
and Austrian petroleum downstream. Im- 
portant harbor improvements are projected 
by the municipal authorities. 



At a recent meeting of the Oriental So- 
ciety at Tokyo the manager of the Japan 
Shipowners' Association stated that for the 
current year the subsidy absorbs 60 per cent 
of the estimated revenue from the business 
tax and 47 per cent of the income tax. The 
total expenditure is $6,595,000 gold, and a 
like amount is included in the present bud- 
get. 



The Spanish liner Reina Cristina sailed 
from Vera Cruz for Tampico on June 10, this 
being the first trip by any vessel of the 
Spanish Transatlantic Company, according 
to the new itinerary, which provides monthly 
service now with Tampico, whereas for- 
merly the vessels did not touch at that 
port. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The National Union of Journalists 
recently held a conference at Leeds 
(Eng.)> at which 1000 delegates were 
present. 

■\ resolution demanding a free sec- 
ular system of education was adopted 
by an overwhelming majority at the 
I'.rilish Trade-Union Congress. in 
Nottingham, Eng., on September 12. 

The Chilean Government has had 
such poor success with foreign labor 
its brought into the country for agri 
cultural purposes that it has decided 
to put an end to the coming of work- 
men from abroad. 

The number of nun employed on 
the Broken Hill (.Australia) mines at 
the end of June, exclusive of staff 
officials, was 6807. as against 8001 at 
the end of March, and 8937 at the end 
of last September. 

Very strained relations exist in New 
Zealand between the coal miners and 
colliery proprietors. The miners 
threaten a general strike if existing 
grievances arc not remedied at an 
early date. 

Reports have been received ai 
Rome, Italy, from Brazil to the effect 
that Italian immigrants in that coun- 
try are dissatisfied with the treat- 
ment given them, saying the food is 
poor and wages seldom paid. 

A large number of unemployed 
made a demonstration in front of the 
City Council chambers at Glasgow, 
Scotland, on September 10, demand- 
ing that work be provided. The 
Council promised to do its best in 
the matter. 

The sawmill operatives at Smyrna, 
where boxes are made for figs and 
raisins, are on strike. Unless a set- 
tlement is effected very soon, the 
trade in those fruits will suffer con- 
siderably, as no shipments can be 
made unless the boxes are ready. 

Friedrich Schmidt, a carpenter of 
Spindelhof, Upper Palatinate, has 
been notified through the Bavarian 
Legation at St. Petersburg that he is 
heir to $7,500,000 in cash and to sev- 
eral estates in Russia, the property of 
a .German soldier of fortune. 

In consequence of the employers 
reducing their wages from 5s. per 
week to 3s, the stocking weavers at 
Wilnaer, in Russia, have gone on 
strike. The strike committee have 
been arrested, but the solidarity of the 
unionists is unshakeable. They de- 
clare that they will die rather than 
submit to a process of slow starva- 
tion to make profits for the masters. 
At the annual meeting of the Vic- 
toria Rivcrina (Australia) branch of 
the Australian Workers' (Shearers) 
Union, held at Ballarat, Mr. W. G. 
Spence, M. P., presiding, the report 
submitted state that the year ending 
May 31, 1908, found the branch 
stronger financially than ever it had 
been in the whole history of the 
Union. The membership had reached 
the great total of 10.203. The in- 
crease for the year was over 3000. 

Fifty-three of the fifty-five do 
in Bellinzona. Switzerland, and its 
suburbs have "gone on strike." They 
are paid by the municipal authorities. 
the salaries ranging from $600 to 
$1000 a year, and by contract must 
give their services free to poor and 
rich alike. They demand a fixed sal 
ary of $500 a year and the right of 
charging fees varying from 50 i 
to $1.50 to patients who are in a posi- 
tion to pay, and special charges for 
night visits. They agree to attend the 
poor without payment. 



Cannon's Clothing- Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LI PPM AN 


BROS. 


532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernest 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Union Goods for Union 


Men 



CAN'T NJSIIfl 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S! 





San Pedro Letter List. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goous sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 

Now Located at San Pedro, 

427 FRONT STREET. 

1 carry a full line of Bail Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 

having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 

I am in position to know the elass of k Is you want. The San Francisco 

Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
n retail stores arc counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



him. Loose labels 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EX CLUSIVELY BY 

TEVTS DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

I, os Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



JACOB OLSE.N 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAX PEDRO. CAL. 



C. L. M U N S O N 

1 lealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



FRED S VENDSEN 



UNION EXPRESS AND 
DRAY CO. 



STAND AT FRONT STREET, 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



When making purchases, from our ad- 
vertisers, always mention the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Jack Joseph is requested to com- 
municate with the Secretary of the 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 

Theodore Hansen, a native of Ger- 
many, last heard of two years ago at 
San Francisco, is inquired for. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Bourgevis is inquired for by 
Ed. M. Bourgevis, who has news 
which will require his atention. Ad- 
dress, 3104 West 99th street, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Port- 
land, Or. 

Nils Nilson, a native of Stavanger, 
Norway, last heard of at Buffalo, N. 
Y., four years ago, is inquired for 
by his parents. Address, Nils Nilson, 
Nedre Bloosenborg, No. 9, Stavan- 
ger, Norway. 

William Vaughn, last heard of on 
the ship Sterling of New York, 1894, 
is inquired for by his mother. Infor- 
mation of his whereabouts should be 
sent to Mrs. William Bishop, 509 
Stanton street, Bay City, Mich. 

Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native 
of Kalmar, Sweden, born September 
IS, 1881, supposed to be sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by 
his sisters and parents. Address, 
Klaes Swensson, Sodra Langgatan 
No. 26, Kalmar, Sweden. 



Absolonsen, Ole M. Johansson, E. 
Agostino, Kaiietti lurgansen, H. 
Alt house, Gustaf Kalian. M. 
Andersen, Emil ECaradza, Gus. 

Andersen, Emil -1591 Karlsson, Th. -961 
Andersen, Fred, J. Kir.st. Hans 
Andersen, Tom -538 Klaesson, Karl 
Anderson, Adler Klein, J. -378 
Anderson, ('has. Krohin, John 

Anderson, Edwart Kuhl, Herman 
Anderson, Miles Land, Gust. 

Anderson, J. Lange, Friderik 

Andersson, Anders Larsen, C. L. -1202 

H. Lehtonen, Hans 

Ardelean, Jean Liebermann, George 

Andetrom, Anel -1157 

Andree, E. A. -1410 Lind, Frank 
Andstrom, Ivar Lindall, George 

Anelsson, C. B. Lindstrom, F. Reg. 

n, Karl A. letter 

Bally, Joe Linman, A. W. 

Barnhill, J. F. Logothetis, Pana- 

Barradi, Herman gotis 

r, Gosta Lonneeke, Aug. -1321 

Bedford, Arthur Lundgren. Karl -l-".i"> 

Behrens, G. Lundkvist, John 

ren, John Lundstedt, Ch. 

Bernhardren, C. Maack, Hans 
Bitter, Herman Madson, James 

Bleasath. Matt Maki, lvar 

Bogdon, Wilhelm Manley, Charlie 

der, J. E. Markman. H. 

Broback, Charles E. Marthlnlns, Olaf 
Brusbard, Ewalt Martin, John B. 

I inlander, Bernhard Mattsson, A. 
Caratja, Conltantin Metze. Gustav 
Carlson, Frank Mikkelson, C. 

Carlson, Frank I. Monterm. J. 
Caspary, August Nelson, J. V. -985 

Celander. Wolmar Nielsen, Gustave 
Chrlstensen, Christ Nielsen, Jens -780 
Chrlstensen, Harry Nilsson, Joban 
Chrlstensen, Gus, Nilsen. H. 

-1054 Nilsen, Carl P. -143 

Christiansen, -901 Nilson, r. -877 
Coffman. W. Milo Nilsson, Edward -895 
Colombay, Louis Nisson, Louis 
Cunningham. .1. Nodeland, George E. 

Dalesten, -1156 Nordin, M. 

Dangal, Gus Norkamp, Richard 

Dryer, H. -670 Olsen, Andreas -759 

Engebretsen, D. B. Olsen, Carl -545 

-668 Olsen, W. -753 

ICriikson, August Orten, Sigurd 
-r,71 Ostlin, Frank 

Erlcksson, ('. E. Pedersen, Anton P. 

Eskbom, Arvid Pedersen, Julius 

Farm. J. B. Petersen, Alfred -788 

Fettis, Peter L. Petersen, William 

Foldat, John Peterson. Nicolous 

Fredi iksen, H. G. Pettersen, Alfred 
-529 Persson, H. -1230 

Fyhri. A. L. Pierson, A. -1102 

Geiger, Joseph Rasmussen, -497 

Geisler, Hans Rau, R. K. 

Grantley, W. G. Reek, John 

(I'aekage) Richardson, Harry E. 

GustafSOn, A. K. -600Rosenglad, Auel 
Gutlirec, Raymond Robinson, Alen 
Maimer, Fred Robsham. Jens W. 

Hansberg, J. B. Rubian, Miehael 

Hansen, Adolf Ruckle, Erwin 

Hansen. Theodor Ryden, Oscar A. 
Hansen, Alfred -1732 Rytka, M. O. -1716 
Hansen, Chris. B. Sardis. Vassllas 
Hansen. Haakon Selin, Gustav F. 
Hansen, Peter Sevaldsen, H. T. 

Hanson, Frank Schmidt, Alfred 

•larmening, F. Schoor. John Van 

Haydn, A. E. Seholz, Guitav 

Haupt, Emdl Schwartz, F. -1259 

Henrickson, R. F. Skand, C. Johansen 
Henilrikson, August Smith. J. T. 

Edvard Sorensen, C. -1664 

Hickman, Fred Sorin. Kristlan 

[psen, Edward S. Steele, Henry D. 
Jacobsen, J. -541 .Steen. Emil 
Jamiesen, J. Svedstruge, E. 

Jauren, Chas. Svensson, Nikolans 

F. -1911 Swanson. I ',. 

Karl Sylvian. Le Bloa 

Jensen, R. -1754 Teigland, K. 

Jensen, J. H. -1311 Thornstrom. Arthur 
i sen. Chris- Tonnesen, Peter 
Man Tuominen, Alfred 

Johansen, Hans Tggla. Alfred 

Johansson, Johan 880Ulke, E. 
John, Robert Wahlstet. A. 

Johnsen, Carl -1345 Wiksten. Arvid 
Johnsen, Fred Wlckstrand, J. 

Johnsen, Karl -1345 Woker, H. 
Johnson, A. -1451 Young, Charles 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Simpson, better known as 
Jack Simpson, age 32, who has sailed 
out of New York on the Portland 
Line, is inquired for by his relatives, 
Mr. J. Childs. 208 McDougall street, 
Biooklyn, N. Y., or communicate with 
the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's 
Union, 15 Union street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




P. H. Salisbury was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on September 17 as master 
of the steamer Maggie, vice William Hughes. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on September 16: 
Steamer Weitchpee, A. Fay, master; steamer 
Sentinel, H. W. Crosby, master. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on September 17: 
Schooner Winslow, O. Fredericks, master; 
schooner W. H. Marston, A. Andersen, master. 
The ships Llewellyn J. Morse, Indiana, Star of 
Italy and the bark Charles B. Kenney arrived at 
San Francisco on September 13 with salmon from 
the Alaskan canneries. 

The Japanese cruiser Aso, formerly the Russian 
cruiser Bayan, and the Japanese cruiser Soya, 
formerly the Russian cruiser Variag, which are 
now used as training ships, will cruise to San 
Francisco in the spring. 

The British ship Scottish Moors, from Ham- 
burg for San Francisco, before reported arrived 
at Montevideo in distress and afterward pro- 
ceeded, has again returned to Montevideo with 
loss of spars and rigging. 

Judge Reid, of the United States Court at 
Seattle, Wash., has been designated by the 
United States Government to try the cases against 
the Japanese recently arrested for seal poaching 
in Behring Sea. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on September 14: 
Steamer Tallac, Louis Hansen master; schooner 
Bangor, C. Peterson master; steamer Svea, C. E. 
Allen master. 

After wandering around with ballast taken on 
on the Coast, the French bark Neuilly arrived 
at Portland, Or , on September 16, carrying the 
same material which had been loaded at San 
Francisco more than six months ago. 

' The schooner Ivy is ashore at Point Barrow, 
Alaska, and it is thought she will be a total loss, 
according to a dispatch received at San Fran- 
cisco on September 18 by the Merchants' Ex- 
change from Nome. The Ivy had no cargo and 
her crew were saved. 

Supervising Inspector John Bermingham has 
suspended for fifteen days the license of Arthur 
Spencer of Everett, Wash., operator of the gaso- 
line launch Ranger. Spencer was found guilty 
of blowing his whistle and casting ridicule upon 
United States inspectors while they were conduct- 
ing fire and boat drill on the steamer Camano. 

The Pacific Mail liner Colon, partially dis- 
masted and showing other evidences of distress, 
arrived at Colon on September 18. She had been 
battered by the hurricane encountered on the 
13th. Three members of the crew lost their lives 
while engaged in the hold in repairing a water 
tank. 

The bark Paramita, engaged in the salmon 
trade, arrived at San Francisco on September 17 
from Naknek, Alaska. In addition to a heavy 
cargo of salmon, the Paramita brought down 168 
men, the members of the crew of the wrecked 
ship Lucile, and the cannery hands of the Red 
Salmon Packing Company. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September IS: Steamer Temple, A. M. Panzer, 
vice H. Paulsen; steamer Zinfandel, George H. 
Pinkham, vice F. J. Murphy; schooner Eva Mar- 
tin, P. Hansen, vice Hans Hansen; steamer Alert, 
F. M. Rendelin, vice Fred Hindt, reported from 
Ketchikan, Alaska. 

Specifications have been issued by the Bureau 
of Yards and Docks inviting bids for dredging 
at Pearl harbor, Hawaii, where the United States 
is to establish an important naval station. Four 
hundred thousand dollars was made avilable for 
the proposed work at the session of Congress, but 
the entire improvement will approximate in cost 
according to estimates $2,500,000. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 16: Steamer Temple E. Dorr, A. M. 
Panzer, vice H. Paulsen; schooner Eva, Martin 
P. Hansen, vice Hans Hansen; steamer Zinfandel, 
George H. Pinkham, vice F. J. Murphy; steamer 



Alert, F. W. Randelin, vice Fred Stindt; steamer 
Aberdeen, J. J. Carey, vice Ole Hansen. 

Louis LeGuenne filed a libel against the British 
ship Wyndford in the United States District at 
San Francisco on September 18 to recover $45, 
this being the amount of a month's wages as 
cook which he alleges is due him and unpaid. 1 It- 
claims that he appealed to the British Consul- 
General at San Francisco, but that the latter de- 
clined to adjudge the claim. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 18: Steamer St. Helena, Frank J. 
Murphy vice E. S. Pigott; steamer Crowley No. 5, 
John P. Lattemore vice Werner Anderson; 
schooner Martinez, Julius Baker vice Peter Jes- 
sen; steamer Fort Bragg, H. W. G. Belisle, vice 
C. J. R. Peterson. 

Arrangements have been made to resume fumi- 
gation of steamers from plague-infected ports on 
arrival at Victoria, B. C, and to establish a 
fumigation station at that port. Heretofore 
steamers from the Orient have been fumigated 
at Hongkong before leaving. Regular coast- 
wise steamers from suspected ports will be fumi- 
gated once a month. 

The Superintendent of Public Works has drawn 
up and Governor Frear has approved a compre- 
hensive plan of improvement for Honolulu har- 
bor. The plan includes the construction of two 
more wharves of a size and a depth of slip suffi- 
cient for the largest steamships on the Pacific 
Ocean, the extension of the Matson wharf and 
slip, and the dredging of other slips so as to ac- 
commodate vessels of large draft. 

Bids were opened in the office of the Kosmos 
line at San Francisco on September 18 for the 
repair of the German steamer Anubis, which es- 
caped destruction several weeks ago on a reef off 
San Miguel Island. The lowest bid was that of 
the Moore and Scott Iron Works, which pro- 
posed to complete the extensive repairs to the 
big steamer within fifty-six days for $68,750. The 
Heffernan Drydock Company, of Seattle, Wash., 
was the second lowest bidder ($68,870), and it is 
thought that the latter firm will be awarded the 
contract. 

Government delay in closing negotiations for 
the purchase of the ships Shawmut and Tremont 
for the Panama Canal service is causing heavy 
loss to the Boston Steamship Company, owner 
of the vessels. The negotiations began in July 
and the ships are held up at Seattle, Wash., pend- 
ing the decision, with no allowance made for 
maintenance during the intervening time. It is 
difficult to get the details from the owners as to 
this expense, but conservative figures place the 
expense of inspection and tying up the ships in 
the vicinity of $110,000 to date. 

The missing British steamer Aeon was reported 
ashore on Christmas Island, one hundred miles 
southeast of Fanning Island, a cable station in 
the South Seas, in a dispatch received at Ban- 
field, near Victoria, B. C, on September 18. In 
a very brief message Captain Downie announces 
that the Aeon is a total loss but the passengers 
and crew are safe. The Aeon sailed from San 
Francisco on July 6 for Sydney, N. S. W., via 
Apia and Auckland, and had not been heard from 
until the receipt of the dispatch from Fanning 
Island. She was quoted at 55 per cent reinsur- 
ance. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on September 18: Ship Toxteth, 
201 days from Port Talbot, 90 per cent; ship 
Mabel Rickmers, 121 days from Yokohama for 
Bangkok, 66 per cent; bark Alice, 119 days from 
New Caledonia for Rotterdam, 15 per cent; bark 
La Barche, 128 clays from New Caledonia for 
Glasgow, 15 per cent; bark Belen, 158 days from 
Eureka for the United Kingdom, 8 per cent; 
ship Antigua, 141 days from New Caledonia for 
Rotterdam. 15 per cent; ship Hyderabad, 127 
days from Tahiti for Rotterdam, 8 per cent; bark 
Gladova, 148 days from Liverpool for Antofa- 
gasta, 25 per cent; bark Amiral Courbet, 115 days 
from, Sydney for Rotterdam, 15 per cent; bark 
Marechal de Villars, 129 days from New Cale- 
donia for Hamburg, 10 per cent. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 

For good beds and clean rooms, go to "THE 
HARRISON," 456 Harrison street, corner of 
First, San Francisco. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND. Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 125 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va„ Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch; 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABLTLA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont, Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 222 State St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
J O U R N A L 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR ' 

PAUL BCHARRENBBRG Jl 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months 

Advertising Kates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
6 East Street, San Francisco. 



.NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible t.u 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1908. 



VOLUME TWENTY-TWO. 



As usual upon such occasions, the Journal 
herewith makes brief reference to the advent 
of another anniversary in its career. With 
the present issue the Journal enters upon the 
twenty-second year of publication. 

Possibly the Journal, now that it is get- 
ting along in years, ought to let the occasion 
pass without special reference. Possibly the 
Journal ought to be too dignified to indulge 
in the "see-me" style of self-congratulation 
that is natural and excusable in younger 
sheets. Possibly the Journal has been seen 
so long and so regularly that its further ap- 
pearance affords no ground for comment 
either by itself or by its readers. Possibly the 
Journal ought to cultivate an air of forget- 
fulness and affect an attitude of superiority 
with reference to the anniversary of its birth. 
However, we are disposed to take a chance on 
all of these possibilities. Labor papers gen- 
erally, and especially seamen's papers, are not 
so long-lived as to deprive the Journal of a 
slight distinction, at least in point of age. 
Until longevity becomes more common among 
our contemporaries than it now is, or until, for 
any reason, the Journal becomes desirous of 
forgetting its own past, it will continue the 
youthful practice of pointing with pride to the 
fact that it is still afloat on the sea of journal- 
ism and fit for any kind of weather. 

For one thousand and eighty-three consec- 
utive weeks the Journal has been issued by 
and for the seafaring craft. Looking back- 
ward, it seems but yesterday since the first 
issue appeared, amid the cheers and jeers of 
friends and foes, respectively. Twenty-one 
years ago the Journal had nothing to sustain 
it but hope — hope opposed to experience. To- 
day the Journal has twenty-one years of ex- 
perience, upon which to base the hope of fu- 
ture growth, progress and success in its chosen 
field. To-day the Journal is no longer a voice 
crying in the wilderness, or a signal of dis- 
tress displayed by a few castaways in the 
maritime world. A round dozen or so of pa- 
pers are now published by the seamen of as 
many nations. These seamen's papers form 
a goodly company, each flying a different flag 



but all bound for the same port, the "Brother- 
hood of the Sea." In making our annual bow 
we wish success to our contemporaries in the 
whole field of labor journalism and acknowl- 
edge our indebtedness to them for instruction 
and inspiration in our own task. 



MAGURE FOR CONGRESS. 



James G. Maguire has been nominated for 
Congress by tin.- Democrats of the Fourth 
Congressional district of California. This 
announcement will be received with pleasure 
and enthusiasm by the champions of clean, 
progressive government everywhere. 

The Journal is not "in politics," but it is 
unreservedly committed to the support of 
Judge Maguire. In taking this position we 
are actuated by a very common, or at least 
very simple, motive, namely, gratitude for 
services rendered and the hope of services still 
to be rendered. The name of Judge Maguire 
is inseparably linked with the history of the 
Sailors' Union and of the organized seamen 
generally. To name but one incident in that 
history, the passage of the Maguire Act, in 
1895, is sufficient for present purposes. The 
measure which bears the name of Judge Ma- 
guire gave freedom to the American seaman, 
placing him upon equality with other classes 
of American labor in respect to his personal 
liberty, and made possible all the progress 
achieved by the seamen in the past thirteen 
years and all the progress which shall be made 
in the years to come. Not only as the spon- 
sor of the most beneficent and far-reaching 
law ever enacted in the affairs of the seamen 
of any country, but also as a courageous and 
devoted friend and counsellor of the seamen 
in all their trials and difficulties, Judge Ma- 
guire occupies a position pre-eminently enti- 
tling him to the seamen's respect and grati- 
tude. 

Personally and by reputation Judge Ma- 
guire is known throughout the length and 
breadth of the Nation as a man of great in- 
tellectual talents, of unimpeachable probity 
and of liberal, even advanced, views upon 
public questions. The return of Judge Ma- 
guire to Congress will inspire new hope and 
courage in the American people and add to 
the significance of the victory for the prin- 
ciples of popular government. Every seaman, 
every workingman, every good citizen and 
every Democrat should bestir himself to insure 
the election of Judge Maguire, as the cham- 
pion of the people in their struggle with the 
powers of privilege. 



"GOING THE WHOLE HOG." 



The Humboldt Times, of Eureka, Cal., in 
its issue of the 13th inst., publishes a column 
of "news" concerning a prospective strike of 
seamen and longshoremen on the Pacific 
Coast. Strange that we should have to go so 
far from home to get the "news" ! After all, 
it isn't so very strange. The paper in ques- 
tion has long been addicted to the habit of 
crying strike, strike, where there is no strike. 
Possibly the wish is father to the thought. 
Of course, some allowance must be made for 
the difficulties of getting any news in Eureka, 
especially for the purposes of a Sunday issue. 
Taking one consideration with another, the 
Humboldt Times man is to be congratulated 
upon his mastery of that first principle of the 
reportorial art, the ability to "draw upon the 
imagination for facts." 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



It is now quite evident that the Republican 
and pro-Injunction press generally, in its des- 
peration at the prospect of a solid "labor vote" 
against the candidates of "Government by In- 
junction," has determined to "go the whole 
hog" in the matter of lying about the position 
assumed by the labor movement in the present 
campaign. A proof of this determination is 
contained in the following, from the San 
Francisco Chronicle. Discussing the recent 
exploit of the "Union Labor" party in San 
Francisco politics, and the unfortunate re- 
sults thereof, the Chronicle endeavors to draw 
a parallel between that incident and the action 
of the American Federation of Labor in the 
present campaign. The Chronicle says: 

There is little doubt that Gompers expects the 
same thing to happen to the Federation of Labor 
as the result of its going into politics. He op- 
posed it as long as he could, but when it became 
evident that he could no longer resist the hot- 
heads without great danger of losing his job, he 
accepted the inevitable and entered into a bar- 
gain with a political party by which he was to 
deliver the labor vote in return for certain prom- 
ises made by the party leaders and embodied in 
the platform. * * * 

Labor can not gain and must certainly lose by 
bringing class issues into political contests — and 
none know this better than intelligent union men. 
And none knows it better than Gompers himself. 

The meaning of this, if there be any mean- 
ing in it, is that President Gompers, in order 
to placate the hotheads, i. e., the political- 
actionists, in the Federation, who, as is well 
known, are Socialists, made a bargain to de- 
liver their votes to the Democratic party! Of 
course, the Chronicle is perfectly safe in pre- 
dicting a rumpus in the labor movement as a 
result of this proposition. But the proposi- 
tion itself is so ridiculous, so utterly at outs 
with the remotest possibility, that it falls to 
the ground of its own weight. Even the most 
casual acquaintance with the character and 
methods of the "hotheads" in the labor move- 
ment is sufficient to indicate the absurdity of 
any attempt on the part of President Gompers 
or anyone else to deliver the Socialist vote to 
the Democratic party. The Socialists them- 
selves would be the last to attribute any such 
assinity to their esteemed friend Gompers. 
The press, in its desperate attempt to split up 
the "labor vote" is driven to the expedient of 
proclaiming Gompers a fool, which, as the 
press well knows, is in itself a piece of egre- 
gious folly. 

To say that "labor can not gain and must 
certainly lose by bringing class issues into po- 
litical contests" is quite true — too true to have 
any significance. As the Chronicle admits, 
this truth is known to 1 intelligent union men, 
even to Gompers himself. Labor has not 
brought a class issue into the present contest. 
On the contrary, labor is now engaged in an 
effort to frustrate the attempt of the "powers 
that be" to establish class distinctions in gov- 
ernmental affairs. It is precisely, and exclu- 
sively, because the courts of the land have 
construed the laws in favor of one class as 
against another class, and because Congress 
has refused to afford the necessary relief from 
this condition, that the labor movement is now 
actively participating in the campaign. The 
attempt to make it appear that labor is seek- 
ing to establish class government has ceased 
to be a case of begging the question and has 
become a case of deliberate and wanton false- 
hood. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



The laundry proprietors of San Francisco 
have combined with the Laundry Workers' 
Union in an organization, named the "Anti- 
Jap Laundry League," for the purpose of 
combating the effects of Japanese competition 
in the laundry business. Thus the prediction 
of the "Kearneyites" and "sandlotters" comes 
true. The cry for the exclusion of Asiatic 
labor is no longer confined to labor and the 
"labor agitator." That cry is now echoed by 
the business man. Now that the Exclusion- 
ists have been proved good prophets, we may 
venture another prophecy, namely, that unless 
the competition of Asiatics be stopped it will 
extend to other industries, great as well as 
small. Those "business interests" which still 
regard themselves as immune from Asiatic 
competition may profit by contemplating the 
fact that the laundry interests themselves oc- 
cupied that position of fancied superiority 
until quite recently. Let it be thoroughly un- 
derstood that no individual or class is safe 
from the competition of Asiatics, yellow or 
brown. The only protection lies in exclusion 
by legislation and seclusion by non-intercourse. 



FURUSETH IN AUSTRIA. 



The Sailors' Union of the Pacific, at its 
meeting at Headquarters on the 21st inst., 
contributed $100 to the American Federation 
of Labor campaign publicity fund. By this 
action the Sailors recognized not only the im- 
portance of the campaign now being carried 
on by the Federation but also their indebted- 
ness to that body for valuable assistance ren- 
dered in the past, particularly in the matter 
of securing legislation. We claim no partic- 
ular virtue for the Sailors in this regard ; but 
we will say that if every labor organization 
similarly indebted to the Federation shall dis- 
charge said indebtedness in equal measure, 
the Federation's fund will prove measurably 
equal to the needs of the occasion. 



Our contemporary, The Seaman, of London, 
Eng., in its September issue, reprints from 
the Journal the first of Furuseth's letters 
from Europe and also the article by Ira Cross, 
entitled "First Seamen's Unions." The Sea- 
man refers to the latter article as valuable for 
the encouragement it affords to those seamen 
who are still struggling for a foothold on the 
rock of organization. Our contemporary is 
to be congratulated upon the splendid fight it 
is making for the British seamen. It is a fight 
which, if maintained, as we have every reason 
to believe it will be, can end in but one way, 
that is, in lasting victory. 



The nomination for Congress of Judge Ma- 
guire and George A. Tracy, in the Fourth and 
Fifth districts of California, respectively, af- 
fords good ground for the prediction that 
California will do her share toward achieving 
one of the chief objects of the present polit- 
ical campaign, namely, a change in the po- 
litical complexion of the House of Represen- 
tatives. Maguire and Tracy have been nomi- 
nated by the Democrats and indorsed by the 
"Union Labor" party. With the proper meas- 
ure of activity on the part of the voters the 
election of both candidates is assured. 



Bound and indexed copies of Volume XXI 
of the Journal may be procured upon early 
application to the Business Manager. The 
weekly issues of the Journal, besides con- 
taining a fairly complete summary of labor 
affairs, constitute a record of the "news of 
the day," which will be found of value to stu- 
dents in almost every branch of investigation. 



So far as I recollect, I have as yet written 
nothing about the conditions of the seamen in 
Austria. There are two Austrian ports, or more 
correctly, one Austrian port, Trieste, and one 
Hungarian port, Fiume. There have been no 
material alterations in the maritime law since the 
time of the Empress Maria Theresa, or about the 
middle of the eighteenth century. I have been 
unable to secure any copy of the law which I 
could at all understand, and several circumstances 
prevented me from securing translations. I find, 
however, that the law provides a penalty of im- 
prisonment for desertion — that is, for violation of 
contract to labor — at home or abroad. 

The condition which in modern shipping fol- 
lows this system of law is apparent in the fore- 
castles, in the food, in the wages, in the treat- 
ment of the seaman on board and in his life 
while on shore. There has been no increase of 
wages on sailing vessels for twenty years, and 
very little increase in the wages on steam ves- 
sels during the same period. Such increase as 
has been secured in the latter class of vessels 
(about 10 per cent) has taken place within the 
past two years. 

The seamen's organization has grown grad- 
ually in the last three years. So far as I could 
note, the seamen are unconscious of the real 
cause of their trouble, and they can but dimly, 
if at all, understand that cause, even when it is 
pointed out to them. Of course, in this matter, 
much allowance must be made for the difficulties 
of communication carried on in a language (Ger- 
man) imperfectly understood, and more imper- 
fectly spoken, by both sides. 

Taking it all through, the seaman of Europe 
feels the wrong and dimly sees the cause. He 
seeks other flags than that of his own nationality; 
then he seeks other work, and his feeling of dis- 
satisfaction with the conditions of sea life is com- 
municated to so much of the land population as 
comes in close touch with him. 

Referring to the Congress at Vienna, there was 
a two-days' conference of the seamen's represen- 
tatives prior to the opening of the main Con- 
gress. The matters discussed dealt almost ex- 
clusively with the administrative feature of inter- 
national unionism among seamen, so that there 
was little or no opportunity to discuss any meas- 
ures of reform in the seamen's conditions on ship- 
board. However, a committee of three, of^which 
I was a member, was appointed, for the purpose 
of considering and, if possible, recommending to 
the Congress itself some action upon a proposal 
for an appeal to all nations for the emancipation 
of the seamen. 

When the Congress met, I endeavored to bring 
up the proposition, but failed to secure its dis- 
cussion. The mattej was finally referred to the 
"Committee on Management," i. e., executive 
committee. The subject will therefore appear in 
the published proceedings, and, of course, reach 
the public, but I am afraid not in such effective 
manner as to count for anything. The total num- 
ber of seamen represented in the Congress, out- 
side of the International Seamen's Union of 
America, was between twelve and thirteen thou- 
sand. 

One thing seems certain. European statesmen 
are gradually — by law, by regulations, by judicial 
decisions and by industrial and personal induce- 
ments — casting a net about the workers, not only 
those in the transportation industry but those in 
all, lines of work, a net which they will some day 
pull tight around the squirming mass of workers, 
who now talk and think of political power to 
control the State, while the State is quietly tak- 
ing away their power in industry. 

The British and French workers partly see this 
tendency, and will resist it, with possible success. 
My impression is that the workers in other na- 
tions fail to see the drift, because they are look- 
ing elsewhere. Fraternally, 

ANDREW FURUSETH. 
Nottingham, Eng., September 5, 1908. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 15, 1908. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
lyiA Lewis St. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 21, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. 

NOTICE: Nominations of delegates to the 
13th annual convention of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America, which opens at New 
Orleans, La., on December 7, 1908, will be made 
at Headquarters and Branches in the regular 
meetings held on or about September 28. 

E. ELLISON, Secretary pro tem. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Agency, Sept. 12, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

A. E. SIMMONDS, Agent. 
Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 14, 1908. • 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation unchanged. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 14, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 14, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 14, 1908. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Sept. 14, 1908. 
Shipping still dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 13, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slack, pros- 
pects poor. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 

San Pedro Agency, Sept. 14, 1908. 
No improvement in shipping; prospects poor. 
H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 8, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation unchanged. 

JOSEPH T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 17, 1908. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Dan Fulton in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 10, 1908. 
Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 12, 1908. 
Shipping poor. 

CHAS. DAWSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2155. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Sept. 14, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary pro tem. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1908. 
Shipping slow. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 
55 Main St. 



DIED. 

Edwin Karlson, No. 503, a native of Sweden, 
aged 34, died in the ship Star of Russia at sea on 
April 29, 1908. 

Louis Larscn, No. 1227. a native of Norway, 
aged 39, died at Naknck, Alaska, on June 22, 1908. 

Joe E. McManus, No. 881, a native of Michigan, 
aged 61, died at Seattle, Wash., on Sept. 10, 1908. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



^fr&* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*&>&* 



STEWARD KILLED. 



Ashtabula, August 31.— While going to the cap- 
tain's quarters for his money on the steamer C. A. 
Eddy to-night, A. L. Bourbonnmain, steward of 
the boat, fell through a hatchway to the ship's 
bottom and was instantly killed. 

He leaves a widow and two children, who were 
on board with him. A sister, Mrs. Lee Smith, 
resides at Coleman, Mich. The body is in 
Ducro's morgue. — Press dispatch. 

The accidental death of Steward Angus 
Bourbonnmain, of the steamer Charles 
Eddy .it Ashtabula, on August 31 brought 
out a peculiar condition of affairs which has 
generated under the "< )pen Shop*' plan. 

Steward Bourbonnmain had his wife and 
two small children on board the vessel, lie 
went forward about 8 p. m. for his money, 
and returning aft he fell through an open 
hatch, and died on the way to the hospital. 
His body was placed in the morgue, and 
Dave Stevenson, agent of the Marine Cooks 
at that port, knowing that the unfortunate 
man's wife and two small children were 
on board, asked an officer to pass him on 
board that particular vessel in order that he 
might tender his services, and those of his 
wife and his home, to the poor widow in her 
time of need. The city police passed Dave 
in to the dock police, who escorted him to 
the vessel. Dave invited the widow to 
bring her babies and come to his home until 
such time as her relatives could be heard 
from. 

After completing his errand of mercy, he 
was leaving the vessel and met Shipping- 
Master Hoffman, who at once threw a fit 
and demanded of the police that the dele- 
gate be thrown off the dock at once. What 
did he care about the widow and the babies? 
The awful fact that a union man was on the 
dock went to his head and he could sec his 
master's orders being ignored. His master 
might not like that, so the delegate must 
go. Never mind if it was none of his busi- 
ness. Never mind if there were police on 
this dock whose duty he was interfering 
with. Never mind if the poor widow whose 
husband's body was not yet cold, was help- 
less on board the boat with two babies. 
All that did not count. The man was not 
counting anything, except that a union dele- 
gate had set his foot on a dock sacred to 
scabs and his master would be displeased. 
This is "Open Shop" and "no discrimina- 
tion!" Even in times of war enemies are 
allowed to take their wounded and dead off 
the field. This unfortunate man had been 
told by his employers : "You must drop the 
Union, or you can't work." And having the 
wife and two babies and not thinking that 
he might still be a union man by secretly 
paying up his dues, he let them run behind 
until he was no longer entitled to the Death 
Benefit. Then he was killed. Now was the 
time for the owner to step forward and say 
to the widow : "Your husband served me 
faithfully ; he is now in my care ; through 
my orders he has lost his benefit in his 
union, therefore, I will bury him, and pro- 
vide you with a home for yourself and 
babies until your relatives come and take 
you." Did he talk that way? Not so as to 
be noticeable. The Marine Cooks' Union 
Agent, Stevenson, took the widow and 
babies to his own home, telegraphed and got 
her relatives ; took up a subscription for 



flowers, and attended to the funeral, and the 
man was decently buried. 

Comrades, there is a lesson in this, a les- 
son you should take home to yourselves. As 
far as any knowledge to the contrary can 
be obtained this loving employer would 
have left that body above ground yet, if the 
Union had been "busted," as they are so 
Fond of telling you it will be. You can see 
the moral for yourselves. 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



ARGO ON THE RIVER. 



It has been reported that the steamer Argo 
may be the running mate of the steamer Flora 
next season on the Saginaw Valley steamship 
run between Detroit, Cleveland and Saginaw, 
hut there is some reason to believe that there 
may be a hitch in the proceedings owing to 
a likelihood of an appeal of the famous case 
in which the steamer Argo has figured in the 
courts in contention between the Graham & 
Morton Transportation Company and the 
underwriters. 

The vessel went ashore on November 24, 
1905, and was released January 26, 1906, and 
taken to Manitowoc, where until June, of this 
year, she remained unrepaired. The Graham 
& Morton line contended that the boat was a 
constructive total loss and this was fought by 
the underwriters, the decision of the United 
States Court of Appeals at Chicago, last 
June, being in upholding the owners' conten- 
tion and declaring the boat a constructive total 
loss. It is said, however, that there is to be 
some further contesting of the case by the 
underwriters and the boat may be tied up until 
the whole matter is finally settled. 

The Argo is an iron hulled freight and 
passenger boat, built in 1901, is 173 feet long 
and 32 feet beam and has a tonnage of 1099. 



GRAIN CROP MOVING. 



WILL BE LENGTHENED. 



The passenger stearrlcr City of South 
Haven, operated by the Dunkly & Williams 
Transportation Company between Chicago 
and South Haven, is scheduled to undergo 
extensive alterations during the winter 
months. The excursion boat will be cut in 
two in the middle and a new section put in 
which will increase her length by sixty 
feet. 

Powerful turbine engines will be put in 
the boat which will make her one of the 
fastest, if not the fastest, excursion steamer 
in the world, it is said. 

A new deck will be added which will be 
used for a dance pavilion and palm garden, 
and the second deck will be the excursion 
deck. The wofk will be done in Detroit and 
the rebuilding will begin as soon as the 
summer excursion season is over. 



The United States Steamboat Inspectors 
at Buffalo recently made a decision in the 
collision of passenger steamers Titania and 
Kingston in Charlotte Harbor on August 
11 and found both masters at fault. The 
master of the Kingston is a British subject 
and nothing was done in his case, while 
Captain Patrick Thorpe of the Titania was 
suspended for six months. 



The advance of the great tide of the 1908 
bumper wheat crop has begun to move in 
earnest, and each day sees an increase in 
the procession of train loads that rolls into 
the terminals at the head of the Lakes. 

Shipments during the past few days have 
increased nearly 100 fold, the bulk coming 
from the south half of the Dakotas and 
northwestern Iowa. Some of the North 
Dakota crop is being held in reserve by the 
more skeptical farmers in the hope that a 
higher price may be realized on the grain 
than is being offered at the present time. 
Notwithstanding this fact, many of the 
northerners are beginning to realize that 
prices are as good now as can reasonably be 
expected and in view of the enormous yield, 
are commencing to place orders for cars in 
which to make shipments. 

The shipping on the Huron, Watertown 
and other branches of the Great Northern, 
which has averaged about 150 cars per day, 
increased to more than 300 recently. 

The car situation at this time is good. 
In fact, the various traffic officials declare 
that cars can be furnished upon short no- 
tice. 

How long this state of affairs is apt to 
remain is problematical, inasmuch as the 
car supply is not inexhaustible, and if farm- 
ers wait until the last minute and then pile 
all their business on the shoulders of the 
railroads at once, the same old story of "no 
cars" will be heard, in spite of the large ad- 
dition which has been made to the rolling 
stock of the various roads during the last 
year. 

Traffic officials of the roads tapping the 
wheat country of the Northwest predict one 
of the largest wheat crops in the history 
of the country, each road claiming that this 
year's output will exceed that of last season 
by something like 10,000,000 to 15,000,000 
bushels. 

The chief complaint of railroad men at 
present is the long empty haul westward, 
which is necessitated by the lack of coal 
shipments. With plenty of cars with which 
to handle any quantity of westbound ship- 
ments, it will be but a question of time, 
according to their story, should an early 
winter set in, before the North Dakota and 
Montana farmers will be suffering from the 
lack of fuel. Notwithstanding this state of 
affairs, the transcontinental roads are doing 
all within their power to stave off a short- 
age of cars for the handling of grain and are 
shipping empties as far W^est as the Mon- 
tana line as fast as there is any prospective 
business in sight. 

Reports from the var'ous agents on the 
Great Northern show that the fall business 
will be at its height about the latter part of 
the current month. 



Coal shipments from Buffalo for August 
amounted to 508,254 tons as compared with 
696,905 tons for July and 656,465 tons for 
June of this year. This brings the total 
shipments from the opening of navigation 
until September 1, up to 2,208.280 tons as 
compared to 1,620,864 tons for the cor- 
responding period of last year. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



STEAMER KERR DAMAGED. 



The steamer W. B. Kerr, of the Tona- 
wanda Steamship Company, was damaged 
to the extent of about $10,000 in a collision 
with the steamer Buffalo of the Western 
Transit Company at Duluth recently. The 
Buffalo, which was coming out from her 
berth at elevator B and was making the 
turn in the channel to get over to N. P. dock 
No. 2, shoved her nose into the forward end 
of the Kerr with such force as nearly to cut 
the boat in two. 

The turn attempted by the Buffalo is a 
sharp one, and the captain of the boat at- 
tributes the accident to the fact that there 
was a stronger current than usual in the 
channel. 

The Kerr had been lying to in the basin 
for some time waiting for sailing orders. 
Her forward compartments rapidly filled. 
She was towed to the Superior shipyard. 

The Buffalo was considerably damaged 
in the crash and she was also forced to put 
in at the shipyards for repairs before con- 
tinuing her trip down the Lakes with her 
cargo. 



OLD WHEEL FOUND. 



What is believed to be the old propeller of 
the old steamer Manhattan portaged across 
the Soo River in 1850 has been dug up by 
the Vulcan shovel in charge of David La 
Prairie, working on the Soo channel. The 
propeller is of a type long since replaced on 
the Lakes ; its like is not in existence any- 
where, and the corroded piece of iron may 
prove a valuable marine relic. 

The propeller is similar to the old Independ- 
ence wheel now held as a relic at the Soo. 
It is about the same as the Independence pro- 
peller, and has five flanges bound about by 
a wide band of iron. 

The Manhattan plied on Lake Superior for 
several years, beginning in 1850, when she 
was taken across the then lockless canal. In 
1854 she received a new propeller wheel, and 
it is presumed that the one recently found 
was discarded at that time. 



LIGHTING THE DULUTH PIER. 



President Livingstone, of the Lake 
Carriers, is combining some important busi- 
ness with his pleasure trip to Duluth. He 
has arranged for the lighting of the north 
pier of the Duluth Canal, the rest of the 
season, and has conferred with Colonel Gra- 
ham D. Fitch and the Duluth public works 
commissioner. The custom has been for 
the city to light the pier during the pas- 
senger season. The Lake Carriers will pay 
for having this continued so long as naviga- 
tion is open. 

The Government owns the light stand- 
ards and globes and the wiring, and the city 
furnishes the current, but the problem will 
be worked out successfully. It will be ar- 
ranged that six of the twin globe lights 
shall be kept burning until the end of the 
season. The present 24-candle power lights 
will be replaced by 32-candle power lights, 
and on each standard will be one plain 
white and one green light. The city will 
furnish the current and render its bill to 
Colonel Fitch, and he will turn the bill over 
to Mr. Livingstone. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



ASHTABULA BADLY BEATEN. 



Great honor is due Ashtabula Harbor ! The 

Cleveland Plain Dealer correspondent at that 

port sends the followings : 

Ashtabula, Aug. 29. — The steamer Joshua 
Rhoades was relieved of her 7,753-ton ore cargo 
to-day in five minutes by six rigs of the new 
machines on the Pennsylvania Lake front docks, 
which is the fastest time ever made here. 

Those Ashtabula fellows are going "nutty" 
in an effort to beat Conneaut's time, but at 
last they have succeeded ! We have never yet 
succeeded in unloading that much ore in less 
than Z l /2 hours. The Plain Dealer's corre- 
spondent ought to be engaged to write press 
notices for Mr. Taft. 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



A telegram from the health authorities at 
Sault Ste. Marie was received at Ashland 
recently stating that Joseph Tardiff, a sea- 
man on the steamer Isaac Ellwood, had 
been put off at Soo with smallpox and ad- 
vising precautionary measures. 



The stocks of grain of all kinds in store at 
the head of Lake Superior as compared with 
the same period last year are as follows : 
Wheat, 1908, 211,154; 1907, 1,616,322. Oats, 
1908, 64,419; 1907, 53,123. Rye, 1008, 51<- 
590; 1907, 12,722. Barley, 1908, 193,328; 
1907, 118,585. Flaxseed, 1908, 435,900; 1907, 
34,371. Totals, 1908, 956,391; 1907, 2,144,- 
123. 



The steamer LeGrand S. DeGraff, of the 
Mills fleet, which went aground at Wind- 
mill Point, near Buffalo, recently, carried 
the largest cargo of ore brought down last 
season, 12,773 tons. The sister-ship of the 
DeGraff, the W. B. Kerr, comes next, with 
12,240 tons, brought down this year. The 
DeGraff was not badly damaged when she 
grounded. 



The Kingston (Ont.) Daily Standard an- 
nounces on what it says is authoritative 
information that a group of influential capi- 
talists, headed by J. H. Plummer, of Mon- 
treal, has purchased the Moore's elevator 
at that place, and purposes to make Kings- 
ton an important transshipping point for 
grain. It is understood that a number, of 
large steel grain-carrying barges will be 
built with capacities ranging from 48,000 to 
60,000 bushels each, to ply between Kings- 
ton and Montreal, in competition with the 
Montreal Transportation Company. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ore shipments for the season up to Sep- 
tember 1 were less than half of what they 
were for the same time in 1907 and in order 
to reach the 25,000,000-ton mark, ore will 
not have to move any more freely during 
the next three months, than it did in August. 
The movement for August was 4,749,655 
tons. The fleet carried 11,984,936 tons up to 
September 1, which was a decrease of 12,- 
356,616 tons compared with the same time 
last year, when the movement was 24,341,- 
552 tons. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



E. J. Wheeler is inquired for by his sister, 
Mrs. Lillian Allen, 2619 J street, Lincoln, 
Neb. 

Comrade Walter Birrell will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Leonard Hull, R. F. D., 
No. 1, Hope, Mich. 

Second-Mate James Tobin, shipkeeper tin 
the steamer Selwyn Eddy, at Milwaukee, is 
reported missing. 

Ed. Rathenow, No. 5388, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is inquired for by his sister, Mrs. Chris 
Marquist, 429 N. Clark street, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Bonner, No. 7823, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is requested to communicate with his 
sister, who is very ill, at Kingston, Ontario. 

John Livingstone Ritchie, No. 21289, Lake 
Seamen's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. M. A. Ritchie, 283 N. Lisgar street, To- 
ronto, Ont. 

John McCormick, a marine fireman, who 
left the Lakes about a year ago, is inquired 
for by Frank McCormick, 191 Fourth street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. Important news. 

William Nilson, a native of Stavanger, Nor- 
way, last heard from at Buffalo, N. Y., in De- 
cember, 1907, is inquired for by his parents. 
Address, Nils Nilson, Nedrc Blassenbofg, No. 
9, Stavanger, Norway. 

Herbert Douglas, Lake Seamen's Union, 
No. 8400, is inquiring for his brother,* John 
Douglas, who is supposed to have been seen 
recently in the Puget Sound country. He 
is 5 feet 8 inches in height, brown hair, blue 
eyes, fair complexion. Address Lake Sea- 
men's Union, 143 W. Madison street, Chicago. 

Anna Eisenbach, 215 Locust street, Allen- 
town, Pa., administratrix for Frank Eisenbach, 
drowned on steamer Cypress in October, 1907, 
wants to know in what bank the funds of de- 
ceased were deposited. She says he had 
money in a bank at some Lake Erie port. 
She also wants the address of Second-Mate 
Pitz, survivor of the Cypress. 



Norman Hamburg is requested to com- 
municate with Wm. Curry, Agent Lake Sea- 
men's Union, Cleveland, O. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND. 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich..., 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND Wis 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone. Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich „..108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada Box 235 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

SUB- AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 725 Quay Street 

ERIE Pa 222 State Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, O 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 H3 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT. MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 
Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mirli. 

Buffalo N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Or.Hirl Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Mane. Mich. 

Green Bay. Wis. Sheboygan, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludlngton, Mich. Superior, Wis, 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA. 



The President has recently appointed a 
commission to report to him suggestions for 
securing greater safety of life at sea. I have 
made to this commission the following sug- 
gestions, which, it seems to me, would, if 
adopted, make for greater safety. As they 
have to do with legislation, I shall be glad to 
have such discussion of them as your publi- 
cation might elicit. 

Suggestion No. 1. 

The passage of an Act of the Congress 
similar to the Merchants' Shipping Act of 
Great Britain, which provides for limiting 
the liability of the shipowners in case of 
loss of life or personal injury to any person 
carried in the ship or in any other vessel, to 
fifteen pounds for each ton of the ship's ton- 
nage. 

As the law stands now, the shipowner can 
limit his liability to "the value of the ves- 
sel and her freight pending." In many 
cases the value of the vessel and her freight 
pending is practically nothing; perhaps this 
is the case in the majority of instances 
where there is great loss of life. In all such 
instances, the heirs or representatives of the 
deceased are entirely without recourse 
against the shipowner, whose servants may 
have been entirely to blame for the loss of 
life. The owners are fully aware of the 
state of the law. If there were a certainty 
of liability on their part in case of negli- 
gence, there would undoubtedly be greater 
care in officering, manning, equipping, and 
running their vessels. 

The Act should, I think, contain a provi- 
sion not only for any person carried in the 
ship or in any other vessel, but for the heirs 
or representatives of any person employed 
on board the ship or any other vessel, and 
not personally at fault for causing his own 
death. 

This suggestion must be considered in 
connection with suggestions numbered 2 
and 3, for the reason that there is not now 
any law of the United States that permits 
any one to recover any damages for the loss 
of life of any decedent upon the high seas. 

Neither in the admiralty nor under the 
common law is there any right of action for 
damages for loss of life. Such a right of 
action exists only where it has been created 
by legislative act. Nearly all of the States 
of the Union have created such a right of 
action, and the Federal courts will enforce 
the State laws in those cases where the ves- 
sel on board of which the loss of life occurs 
hails from a State having such a law. How- 
ever, none of the States, except perhaps Vir- 
ginia, gives a lien for such loss of life ; and, 
as in any catastrophe the lien claims are 
always more than sufficient to eat up any 
fund arising from the value of the vessel and 
her freight pending, those who have claims 
for loss of life are without recourse. 

Suggestion No. 2. 

An Act of the Congress giving a right of 
action, enforceable in the admiralty, for loss 
of life on the high seas, and making the 
right of action a maritime lien against the 
offending thing, of the same grade with the 
lien for personal injuries. 

If suggestions No. 1 and No. 2 were en- 
acted into law, there could be recovery in 
all cases of negligent loss of life at sea. As 
the laws are now, it is almost impossible to 
recover for any such loss, and an utter im- 



possibility where there is a great loss of 
life in any catastrophe. With the certainty 
of this liability, it would seem certain that 
there would be greater care to prevent such 
loss. 

Suggestion No. 3. 

An Act of the Congress similar to the 
Railway Employers' Liability Act enacted 
by the latest Congress, giving a right of 
action for personal injuries to and for loss 
of life of emlpoyes on vessels engaged in 
interstate or foreign commerce, where such 
injuries or loss of life are caused by negli- 
gence of fellow-servants. 

Such legislation as is here suggested 
would, I think, not only materially aid in 
protecting life, but would tend to harmonize 
the laws and to secure justice where in the 
past in similar cases there has been no 
remedy. 

F. R. Wall. 

San Francisco. 



NOVA SCOTIA FISHING. 



So prolonged has been the catch so far 
this season that it puzzles the fishermen to 
handle it. The supply of barrels being low, 
fishermen are preparing to pack the mack- 
erel in puncheons, boxes, old boats, or any- 
thing else they can find. Other than the 
shortage of barrels, the only drawback is in 
the supply of salt, which is running low in 
many of the ports along the coast. Rush 
orders are being sent for a sufficient supply. 
Old fishermen state never before in their 
recollection have the mackerel been so nu- 
merous as they are at the presnt time along 
this coast, and with the fine weather they 
are reaping a great harvest. 

Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, is claiming to 
be a rival of Gloucester, Mass., as the port 
handling the most fish in North America. 
During the week ending June 6 reports are 
available for 19 vessels of the Lunenburg 
fishing fleet, which shows that these vessels 
caught 15,150 quintals, of 112 pounds each, 
of fish, which were worth at that time $6.50 
a quintal, representing a harvest of $98,475, 
an average for the week for each vessel en- 
gaged of about 800 quintals, or $6,000. 

The mackerel catch of Guysboro, Nova 
Scotia, this season has been the largest in 
the last twenty years. Here it is not un- 
common for one man to catch from 1,200 to 
1,800 mackerel in his nets, sometimes mak- 
ing as high as $200 a day. 

At Riverport, Nova Scotia, the catch is 
also far above the average. Reports from 
14 schooners fishing off the banks show that 
they have caught 13,300 quintals of 112 
pounds each, valued at $56,650, an average 
of over $4,000 for each vessel. 

The mackerel are first rough dressed on 
the vessel from which they are caught, then 
sold and landed and put through another 
process of dressing, being more carefully 
prepared and put down in salt brine in bar- 
rels of 200 pounds each, containing from 
120 to 300 mackerel each, according to the 
size. These sell at wholesale from $10 to 
$12 a barrel, and are shipped principally to 
Boston and New York and the cheaper 
grades to the West Indies. 



LABORS ECONOMIC PLATFORM. 



Owing to the deplorable condition of the 
India gunny trade, it is proposed to further 
curtail the factory operations to four days a 
week, or spread the sixty hours over the 
entire week. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and at not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S 
OF AMERICA. 



UNION 



(Continued from Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 44-46 Bast St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER. B. «'. ''or. Carrel and Powell BU., 
r. o. Box 1836. 

TACOMA, Wash.. 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSENI). Wash.. 114 Qulncy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 334. 

PORTLAND, Or.. 51 U n j on Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal., 827 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

BAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 2380. 

HONOLULU, II. T.. 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO. Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. Colman Dock. Room 10. P. O. 
Box 875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN TEDRO, Cat. P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. 
Box 42. 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA. Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA. CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. Cal.. 200 M St. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. 8. W. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



JUDICIAL DISCRIMINATION. 



It is the present policy for many of the 
leading publications and daily papers to at- 
tack the trade-unions with the accusation 
that they are endeavoring to cast the shad- 
ows of suspicion over the integrity of our 
courts. If it were true that any of our 
courts were corrupt, it would be our signal 
duty to give all possible publicity to the fact 
regardless of the criticism which such action 
might arouse, or the emnity it might create. 

The integrity of our courts, however, has 
not, and is not being questioned by the 
trade-unions, or their leaders, no charge of 
dishonesty or corruption being made against 
them. There has been criticism of decisions 
handed down in connection with cases aris- 
ing from industrial disputes between em- 
ployers and employes, and open condemna- 
tion of the action of courts of equity, be- 
cause of those injunctions issued, which 
have abrogated constitutional rights and 
privileges. But this criticism has not raised 
a question of judicial integrity, though it 
has questioned the court's authority and 
competency, as well as the justice and 
equity of their decisions. 

The belief that a court is in error, or that 
its decision is unjust, in no way carries with 
it the assumption that it is dishonest, or casts 
an imputation upon its integrity. Every 
time that a case is appealed from one court 
to another, it implies that the appellant be- 
lieved the lower court's decision to have 
been unjust, or that its decree was not in 
accord with the law. When a court's de- 
cision is reversed by a higher court, it does 
not imply that the lower court was lacking 
in honesty and integrity, but that it was in 
error, and failed to properly interpret and 
apply the law. 

In addition to misapplication of the law, 
courts may exceed the powers given to them 
by the law, and may assume to hand down 
decisions which in substance make new 
laws, the court practically assuming the 
powers of a legislature, yet this would not 
imply that they were corrupt, and a severe 
criticism of their action is not an attack 
upon their integrity, though it may be upon 
their jurisdiction. 

The trade-unions have as much confidence 
in the integrity of our courts as any other 
group of citizens, and believe in the honesty 
of the judiciary, but this does not lead them 
to the belief that because a judge is honest 
that his decisions are always' just, or in 
harmony with the law, any more than a just 
and proper respect for the law, implies that 
all laws are just and equitable. Many of 
our laws are unjust, glaringly so in some 
instances, yet those who attack the injustice, 
and endeavor to have the law repealed, are 
not lawless, but are proceeding in a most 
lawful manner to secure justice. 

No man of character would for a moment 
entertain the thought that the Supreme 
Court of Massachusetts was lacking in in- 
tegrity, or harbor the belief that its mem- 
bers were other than men of the highest 
standards of morality, honesty of purpose 
and legal acumen, yet that court recently 
handed down a decision which in our opin- 
ion is one of the most unjust and mischiev- 
ous in the history of that State. A criticism 
of this decision is not a reflection on the 
court's integrity, but upon its judgment; 
the proof that a man is honest not being 



sufficient evidence that his ideas and opin- 
ions are either accurate or just. 

While our faith in the integrity of our 
courts will equal that of any other group of 
citizens, no matter how high their regard 
for the character of our judicary may be, we 
believe that in many instances our courts 
fail in administering even-handed justice 
between employer and employe, at times 
giving the employer privileges which are 
withheld from the workman, and creating 
judicial class distinction. Against such de- 
cisions we protest, believing them to be 
both unjust in themselves and destructive 
of our rights and liberties. In fact, it is a 
duty resting upon every citizen to freely 
criticize any act, legislative or judicial, which 
contains an element of injustice and which 
tends towards the creation of special or class 
privileges. It is by the respectful discussion 
of such matters that the public mind be- 
comes educated, and we are informed of the 
injustice done, and without this there could 
be no progress towards higher standards. 

Two decisions have been handed down re- 
cently, one by the United States Circuit 
Court of Nevada and one by the Supreme 
Court of Massachusetts, which in them- 
selves establish the doctrine, that the em- 
ployers have rights which their workmen 
may not enjoy, in other words, the decisions 
create class privileges. 

In the Nevada case the court held tnat the 
laws passed in 1903, making it unlawful for 
an employer to exact from an employe, as 
a condition of obtaining or continuing in 
employment, an agreement not to become or 
continue a member of a labor organization, 
or an agreement to become or continue a 
member of such an organization, was in- 
valid under the constitutional provision that 
under the constitutional provision that "no 
one shall be deprived of life, liberty or 
property without due process of law," since 
it deprived the employer of liberty to con- 
tract as to matters which might be vital to 
him. Upon this construction of the law the 
court held that the agreement between the 
mine owners that they would not employ 
any person who belonged to a certain trade- 
union, or to any affiliated organization, was 
not an unlawful conspiracy. 

A number of the mine operators intent 
upon disrupting the organization among 
their employes, had entered into an iron- 
clad agreement not to hire any union men, 
and to discharge all those in their employ 
unless they immediately agreed to drop 
their membership in the union. It was a 
boycott against all union men in the truest 
sense of the term, and to uphold their action, 
and give it legal sanction, the court held the 
law preventing discrimination against union 
workmen to be unconstitutional. 

In the Massachusetts case the building con- 
tractors of Lynn had entered into an agree- 
ment among themselves not to sign any fur- 
ther wage agreements with the building trade- 
unions, and to assist each other in establishing 
non-union conditions. When non-union con- 
ditions, or, as the court termed them, "open 
shop conditions" were introduced the work- 
men struck, and an injunction was issued 
against them, and recently approved by the 
Supreme Court of the State, which restrained 
them from continuing on strike and from the 
payment of strike benefits, the language of 
the Supreme Court on this point being: 

"It follows that the plaintiffs were entitled 
to an injunction restraining the defendants 



from combining together to further the 
strike in question, and from doing any acts 
whatever, peaceful or otherwise, in further- 
ance thereof, including the payment of strike 
benefits, and putting the plaintiffs upon the 
unfair list." 

In Nevada, the Federal court held that it 
was unlawful for the employers to combine 
and agree to discharge all union workmen, 
and give employment to none but non-union 
men. In Massachusetts the Supreme court 
held that it was unlawful for workmen to 
agree among themselves not to work for those 
employers who were organized and actively 
engaged in an effort to disrupt their organiza- 
tion. 

It is decisions of this character that deserve 
examination and criticism, not upon the 
ground that the courts are lacking in integrity, 
but because their decisions impose most un- 
just conditions, and give to one class of cit- 
izens rights and privileges which are denied 
and withheld from others. 

The workmen are not versed in the prac- 
tice of law and in legal phraseology, but they 
can readily perceive an injustice, and when 
they find a court which announces that their 
employer has a legal right to discharge them 
because of their membership in a trade-union, 
but denies their legal right to strike in self- 
protection, they lose their respect for the 
court's standards of justice, even though they 
do not question the court's integrity. 

It is apparent that serious mistakes have 
been made in the appointment or election of 
certain judges, not because of their lack of 
integrity and honest motives, but because of 
their sympathies for vested and property in- 
terests, which they acquire in the law schools 
and-theirsocial environments, and theirignor- 
ance of the actual conditions prevailingin the 
industrial world of to-day. Whenthesejudges 
impose injustice by their decisions, it is our 
duty to vigorously call attention to the same, 
and in doing so, no fair-minded person will 
charge us with attacking the integrity of the 
judiciary. 

There has been a marked tendency of late 
for decisions which grant greater liberty to 
the employers in questions involving their re- 
lations with their employes, and, which at the 
same time restrict the field of action for the 
workmen, and this tendency is one of the 
most dangerous features of the present period. 
It can only be overcome by a more complete 
education of the public mind, and by the exer- 
cise of greater care when electing judges, 
supplemented by the enactment of legislation 
which will more clearly define the workman's 
rights, and in certain directions limit the 
court's power and authority within well- 
defined bounds.— International Molders' Jour- 
nal. 



A tunnel more than a mile in length, said 
to be the longest in existence for use by 
municipal electric surface car lines, has just 
been opened for operation by the Genoa 
Street Railway Company. It connects Genoa 
with the adjacent large commune of Riva- 
rolo, which previously was reached by cir- 
cling the mountain, the distance being now 
shortened 1 1-3 miles, and the trip is made 
in fifteen minutes less time. Constructive 
works began on June 1, 1905. The boring 
was accomplished by 900 workmen, partly 
by hand, by electrical machines, and by com- 
pressed-air machines. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







EUREKA, CAL. 



The United States battleships Ala- 
bama and Maine arrived at Naples, 
Italy, on September 16. 

The United States battleship fleet 
sailed from Albany, West Australia, 
on September 18, fur Manila, P. I. 

Rear-Admiral Henry Glass, U. S. N. 
(retired), died at Paso Robles, Cal., 
on September 1, after a long illness. 
aged 64 years. 

The two-masted schooner recently 
reported sunk off Cape Henry, while 
in tow of a tug, was the Patrick Mae 
Cabe. No one was on board. 

The White Star line has decided to 
resume its freight service between 
Liverpool and Xew York, which re- 
cently was withdrawn, owing to the 
slackness of trade. 

For three days during the passage 
of the steamer Minnehaha from Ell 
rope, which ended at New York on 
September 14, her crew fought a stub- 
born fire which had started in one of 
the coal bunkers. 

Within a few days a contract will 
be awarded by the Secretary of War 
which will result in the completion of 
Philadelphia's 30-foot channel to the 
sea. The contract will probably be 
given to the American Dredging Com 
pany, of Philadelphia. 

The steamship City . of Columbia, 
at New York from Savannah, reported 
that on September 4 she passed a sub- 
merged wreck, with a stump of a mast 
projecting about ten feet out of the 
water. The wreck is regarded as very 
dangerous to navigation. 

The Italia line's new steamship 
Taorimina recently sailed from Na- 
ples for Philadelphia, Pa. The new 
ship is larger than either the Ancona 
or the Verona. Her displacement is 
14,000 tons, and she has better ac- 
commodation for passeng 

A dangerous derelict was reported 
recently by the German steamship 
Energie. On August 25 the Energie 
sighted a schooner's mast projecting 
about 15 feet out of water and at- 
tached to a submerged wreck, in lati- 
tude 26.34 north, longitude 86.59 
west. 

Captain Baker, of the Morgan liner 
El Cid, which arrived at Galveston. 
Tex., recently, brought with him a 
carrier pigeon which he picked up at 
sea 650 miles off the Texas coast. The 
bird had attached to its leg a silver 
band bearing the inscription "No. 19. 
R. B." 

With a story of terrific gales and 
the loss of two men overboard, the 
American schooner Isaac T. Campbell 
arrived at New York recently from 
Guantanamo, Cuba, by way of Dela- 
ware Breakwater. 34 days out. The 
lost men were Uenrik Straith, of Nor- 
way, aged 23, and Yarko Wuallo, of 
Finland, aged 28. 

The statements of steamship pas- 
sengers, as compiled by the Transat- 
lantic Passengers Conference, shows 
that foreigners continue to leave the 
United States in large numbers. Out- 
going steamships carried 11,992 steer- 
age passengers in one week recently, 
as compared with 8234 arriving on the 
west-bound vessels. 

The British steamship Dunolly, re- 
cently at New York from Barcelona, 
reports that on September 8, in lati- 
tude 39.15, longitude 56.19, she passed 
a white-painted, three-masted, water- 
logged schooner with all the masts 
standing and the sails hanging from 
jibboom. She gave the appearance of 
having been only recently abandoned. 
The sea was too rough at the time 
to launch a boat. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



SMOKE, 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups. Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET. COR. P, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE "ALOHA" 

Harry Klemme, Proprietor. 

First-Class Rooms at very moderate 
rates. Summer garden attached. 

Cor. Queen and Richard Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAMAMSB3N, Prop. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing. Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnside 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 




Foul Catarrh 

DEAFNESS, DYSPEPSIA, BLINDNESS, 
BAD BLOOD, DISEASE, DEATH, FOL- 
LOW THE RAVAGES OF FOUL 
CATARRH. 

Upon request we will send an abso- 
lutely free treatment which we know 
will immediately benefit any catarrh suf- 
ferer, no matter how long standing the 
disease may be. Not a patent nostrum, 
but a scientific remedy, put up from a 
specialist's prescription and guaranteed 
to be absolutely free from cocaine, mor- 
phine, chloroform or opiates of any kind. 
It's use is positively safe. If you want a 

Free Treatment 

all you need do is send your name and 
address at once to E. L. Baldwin, Phar., 
20-S Market St., San Francisco. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. f. 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 



See the Dog? 
Is he a Tough Dog? 

HE IS 

So are the 

OVERALLS 

He Represents 

Don't take our word for it, 

but buy a pair 

They will 

MAKE GOOD 



5 05S S RO *u 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 

only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period if 
not called or sent for. 

Aheng, C. Kuntz, K. 

Allen, J. W. Larsen, H. J. 

Andersen, Albert Lattz, L. 

Anderson, A. P. Lohme. E. 

Anderson, HJalmar Larson, F., -1098 

Anderson, J., -1514 Lebrun, E. 

Anderson, A. Leaky, W., -925 

Anderson, Victor Leisman, J. 

Axes, P. Lepp, E. 

Barry, Thomas Lie. J. C. 

Baandsen, E. M. Lind, H. E. 

Barwa, D. Lindin, H. Van 

Bakke, M. C. Lindburg, John 

Bateman, S. J. Lindman, H. C. 

Bernard, S. Lindroos, C. 

Benners, Lichlenberg, Max 

Bensen. J. E. Lockey, H. 

Berg, H. M. Lunder, B. 

Bergren, John Lundquist, J. 

Bertelsen, Alf. Lubeck. R. A. 

Bernsen, C. T. Lundblad, E., -789 

Berkelund, R. Madison, Chas. 

Blomquist, B. Marthisen, M. 

Blomquist. H. Mayers, P. M. 

Boman, O. W. Mannian, James 

Brander, M. F. Marthininssen, K. 

Bruhn, B., -1430 McKerron, W. 

Buchtman, P. McAdam, J. 

Burke, James Meddicott, F. 

Casperson, Chr. Mikelson, C. 

Cornell, G. B. Mikkelson. Jos. 

Clarkson, C. H. Mortensen, Chr. 

Courtney, A. I. Mortensen, Holger 

Conigan, P. J. Mare, C. F. 

Derrick, Geo. Murphy, D. 

Dinwooden, Jas. H. Myren, A. 

Donovan, James Nelsen, Martin 

Dowling, S. G. Newland, E. 

Drager, Otto Nielsen, Jorgen 
Edwards, E. M., -149NleIsen, Karl 

Edvardson, John Nielsen, N. C. 

Ekvall, G. A. Nyburg, Eric 

Ellingsen, P., -568 Olsson, E..-966 

Elwood, Alf. Olsson, Johan 

KUiasen, H. O. Olsson, Otto 

Emersen, E. Olsen. H., -959 

Falch, O. A. Olsson, Oscar 

Faluck, L. Orchard, S. H. 

Farley. Geo. Overvik, Thos. 

Fitzgerald, H. Paulson, Paul 

Flynn, P. J. Petterson. O., -710 

Fournier, G. Petersen, Olavus 

Frohery, F. Pederse, Lars 

Gad. V. Pedersen, O. A. 

Gent, A. C. Pedersen, Krlstian 

Gilifson, Frank Pendville, N. 

Gronlund, Oscar Pemberton, D. 

Grusden, Edw. Pletanzo, A. 
Gustafson, A. W..Pfeifer, K. 

-700 Paige, L. 

Gudmundsen, J. Rasmussen, F. 

Guttman, H. Rasmussen, N. C. 
Gulliver, W. H. -924 

Hehkonen. G. A. Sanches, F. 

Hansen, Jens M. Schulz, E., -1842 

Hansen, E. A. Sibelin, Chr. 

Hansen, Mike Siverksen, S. B. 

Hattness, M. Shane, J. 

Hagman, H. Sovig, C. 

Healey, James Soderlund, J. F. 

Helman, Karl Stuho, M. 

Hlxon, J. W. Steinburg, A. 

Hange, A. Sundqulst, C. 

Haygard, T. S. Svensen, J. 

Holmgren, G. J. Swensson. B. 

Huslide, H. Taxt. Thos. 

Ivertsen, S. B. Tellefsen, P. 

Iversen, P. Tennant, T. 

Jamison, J. Thompson, R. 

Jacobson, H. J. Thoralls, L. M. 

Jack, Paul Tuominen, Alf. 

Jasperson, J. Vagnhill. G. 

Jensen, Johannes Wahlstedt, A. R. 

Johansen, C. J. Wahlstedt, G. R. 

Johnson, Gunder Wankle, F. 

Johansen, Carsten Walz, E. 

Jaimson, Nils Wallace. A. 

Jerfold, Theo. Webber, C. 

Joakinson, W. Whitley, A. 

Johnson, Alf. Winsmer, Geo. 
Karlson, K. A., -551Willlamson. A. 

Kalmlng, J. Waulters, H. 

Km1ii.hi. A. Worm, A. 

Kahlbetzer, F. Walters, W. 

Kleine. Carl Wokes, H. 
Klingenburg, J.. -660Zimmer, W. 
Kristoffersen, Geo. 



OVERALLS 



NeustadterBros 

$..c ~ - 



Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native of 
Kalmar, Sweden, born September IS, 
1881, supposed to be sailing on the 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
sisters and parents. Address, Klaes 
Swensson, Sodra Lauggatan No. 26, 
Kalmar, Sweden. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 

Anderson, Carl Lonnquist, Ossian 

Afidersson, J. S. Lerch, Paul 

Aeckerle, E. Lindholm, A. 

Bagdon, W. Lundquist, Fred 

Berthelsen, Alfred Meijer, O. W. G. 
Berghold, Hermann Madsen, -1677 

Coye, Chas. Nelson, Johan 

Christoffersen, Olaf Newmann, Curt 
Espensen, Espen N.Olsen, Osvald 

Fjelstad, John Osvald, T. 

Gunther, Hans Olson, John 

Holmes, T. A. Osol, Theo. K. 

Hartman, Chas. Petersen, William 

Holllns, Frank Peterson, Nlcolai 
Holmberg, O. B. -1235 

Hawaii, S. G. Petersen, Frank 

Jensen, Peter Sollen, Le 

Jensen, Hans, -1826 Schmidt, Alfred 

.Tahnke, Arthur Shallow, John 
Johansen, H., -2126Schultz, Axel 

Johannesen, -1441 Sjostrom, T. E. 

Johnson, C. A. Saar, Hans 

Knudsen, Peder Stenzel, Walter Otto 

Kone, Ernest Teigland, T. 

Kreman, Martin Tupitz, Con 

Knutson, A. Winche. August 

Koch, Carl Yates, James 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Andersen, Hjalmar 
Asker, S. J. 
Hoffman, Tom 
Henriksson, G. H. 



Kannnen, Lars 
Le Fort, Guervis 
Moberg, Alf. 
Williams, Chas. 



Jensen, Ingwald M. Wilson. Herman 






When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT 


BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND 

Cor. of HERON 
ABERDEEN, 


JEWELRY 

& G STS. 

WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &. CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Alexander & McBride 

t03 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

'PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
SI 5 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 






INFORMATION WANTED. 

Oscar Sunersson, last heard of 
about four years ago when employed 
in a tug at San Francisco, is inquired 
for by his brother. Address, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 

TACOMA, WASH. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 




WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., of Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, - SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 171S. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation End Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 

American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



R. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



^» m m y-<w W^^"r~^Y~ , % ^» See that this labe! ( in Jfe 11 * blue ^ 
^lvl vJlV t^lx ^ :i|l, "" s "" t,K '"' x m w,n( '' 1 



you are served. 



&SEn.«8o2g32 

Issued by Authority of tne Cigar Matters' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars 

<Zlli5 Cjcrlil lf#. That the Oaan contained inthls box ban been made by » fitfCfc Wfoltal 
a WMbtROI THt ClGAfi MAJtERS'lDTUNAIIOKU. UNION ol AiMtica. an oroanizaijon devoted to the ad- 
vancement ol tne MORALMATEBIAland INTEIUCTUAI W[ LtARi or THE QUIT. Therefore we njcomata 
these CioafS to all smoke/s ihtouohout the world 
' All iafnngero.au upon this label nil be punished acctfdmo. to law 



i» *™ J- W ^^^. £«** 



/■.fa wflM 




BY INSISTING UPON PURCHAS- 
ING UNION STAMP SHOES 

You help better shoemaking conditions. 
You get better shoes for the money. 
You help your own Labor Position. 
You abolish Child Labor. 

Do Not Be Misled by retailers who 
say: "This shoe does not bear the 
stamp, but is made under Union Condi- 
tions." 

This is false. No shoe is union-made 
unless it bears the Union Stamp. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



A decision is pending before Judge 
De Lacy, in the Juvenile Court as to 
whether the Child Labor law of the 
District of Columbia applies to news- 
boys. 

Secretary of Commerce and Labor 
Straus and T. V. Powderly have been 
commissioned to impress labor with 
the friendliness of Mr. Taft and the 
Republican party to its cause. 

The wages of the women employed 
in sewing uniforms at the Brooklyn 
(N. Y.) Navy Yard have been re- 
duced recently, and the women have 
decided to petition the Navy Depart- 
ment. 

The regular hours of labor per week 
during July were four-tenths of 1 per 
cent lower, and the number of em- 
ployes in establishments investigated 
by the Bureau showed an increase of 
1 per cent. 

The national convention of Post- 
office Clerks at Birmingham, Ala., on 
September 9 adopted resolutions in 
favor of extending classified civil serv- 
ice to clerks of first and second class ■ 
offices, regardless of city delivery. 

Orders were posted at the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad shops at Altoona, 
Pa., recently increasing the working 
time to 50 hours a week. The order 
affects 10,000 employes, most of whom 
have been working only 36 hours a 
week since last November. 

Orders were issued recently for re- 
sumption at the Blandon rolling mill 
at Reading, Pa., on September 14. 
Nearly 200 men returned to work. At 
the same time the employes of the 
Reading Railway Company's loco- 
motive shops went on longer time. 
: The average wages per hour in the 
principal manufacturing and mechani- 
cal industries of the country were 3.7 
per cent higher in 1907 than in 1906, 
while retail prices of food were 4.2 
per cent higher, according to the July 
report of the United States Bureau of 
Labor. 

According to the report of the * 
United States Bureau of Labor, the 
retail price of the principal articles 
of food was 20.6 per cent higher in 
1907 than for the period 1890 to 1899. 
Compared with the average for the 
same ten-year period the food-pur- 
chasing power of an hour's wage in 
1907 was 6.8 per cent greater. 

One million dollars will be dis- 
bursed by the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers in the construction 
of permanent headquarters in Cleve- 
land, according to plans just an- 
nounced by Warren S. Stone, Grand 
Chief of the organization. This sum 
includes the price of land. The build- 
ing will be twelve storfes in height. 

The United Typothetae of America 
has adopted a declaration of policy 
confirming the "Open Shop" plan. 
Among other planks it contains the 
following: "The United Typothetae 
of America is opposed to any agree- 
ment between the local typothetae or 
individual members thereof and em- 
ployers' unions for the control of the 
trade or membership.''' 

The purchasing power of an hour's 
wage, as measured by food, was less 
in 1907 than in 1906, the decrease be- 
ing one-half of 1 per cent. The re- 
port of the United States Bureau of 
Labor shows that, as compared with 
the ten years preceding, 1890 to 1899, 
the average wage in 1907 was 28.7 per 
cent higher, the number of employes 
44.4 per cent greater, with a decrease 
of 5 per cent in the average hours of 
labor per week. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




ZZ\ San Francisco Letter List. 



Nine Mormon converts who arrived 
at Boston, Mass., on August 23 on the 
steamship Republic from Liverpool 
were deported on the steamer Cymric 
on September 13. 

Registration in the public schools 
of New York City has closed and 
shows that this year there will he an 
increase of about 20,000 pupils 
last yaar. The registration this year 
is 640,000. 

That the immigration tide 
turned again was indicated on 
tcmber 11, when the Cunard liner 
Lusitania arrived at New York with 
973 third-class passengers, practically 
all of whom were laborers. 

Orville Wright, the famous inventor 
of the aeroplane, was severely injured 
and Lieutenant Thomas E. Selfridge 
was killed by the collapse of the aero- 
plane during an experimental flight at 
Fort Myer, Va., on September 17. 

In a flight lasting one hour, ten 
minutes and twenty-six seconds, Or- 
ville Wright, at Fort Myer, Va., on 
September 11, surpassed all his pre- 
vious exploits for a time-and-distance 
flight for a hcavier-than-air machine. 
Two financial institutions in Pitts- 
burg, Pa., the Cosmopolitan National 
Bank and Mount Washington Savings 
and Trust Company, were closed on 
September 5 by orders from the Fed- 
eral and State banking authorities. 
It is reported that President 
Roosevelt, in his final annual mes- 
sage to Congress, probably will rec- 
ommend an increase in the army to 
at least 100,000 men. At present 
the army is on a footing of 60,000 
men. 

By an agreement entered into on 
September 9, the Democratic and 
Republican State Central Committees 
of Nevada bound the Legislative can- 
didates of both parties to abide by 
the popular vote for United £ 
Senator. 

Dave Newton, a negro, charged with 
being implicated in the murder ol 
John Buchtrin, a white man, who was 
shot and killed at his home 
Brookshire, Tenn., on September 12, 
was taken from jail by a mob and 
hanged. 

Conductors and trainmen of the 
Lehigh Valley Railroad have been 
notified that consumptives will not 
he permitted to ride on the trail 
thai road in the future unless they 
carry with them sputum cups and 
private drinking cups. 

Judge Huston, in the District 
Court at Guthrie, Okla., on Septem- 
ber 5 denied to the State Banking 
Board the power to dictate the num- 
ber of banks a town or city may have, 
and ordered the Hank Commissi 
to issue permission to the Farmers 
and Merchants' Bank of Prague to 
begin business. 

The earnings of the Union Pacific 
and Southern Pacific railroads for 
July were the largest that either of 
these roads has reported for that 
month in its history. In case of both, 
however, the gross earnings showed a 
material decrease as compared with 
last year. 

President Roosevelt has pardoned 
K. Yashida. a Japanese, who with Oth- 
ers was convicted in 1905 in Alaska for 
murdering the Japanese foreman of a 
canning factory in which they were 
employed, for which he was sentenced 
to thirty years in the penitentiary, on 
condition that he sail at once for Ja- 
pan, the pardon taking effect when he 
goes on shipboard at San Francisco. 



Letters at the San Franeisco Sailors' 

Offl are advertised for three 

months only and will lie returned to the 

Post Office it the expiration of five 

months from 'late of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 

these columns should at once notify 

i- Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 

.,, to forward same 

to the port of their destination. 



Aaltonen, K. 
Abel, Paul 
Idams, D. J. 

Alvarez, F. Lopez 
Andersen, A. Emll 
Andersen, w. A. 
Andersen, 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Nils A. 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, Lars T. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Anderson, -764 
Anderson, A. C. 
Anderson, Ernst J. 
Anderson -1298 

ion, Wm. 
Bahr, Frank 
Banke, -1646 

nan, S. J. 
Bauer, Gosta 
EJauman, Ernest 
F. 

Behrends, G. 

ESeling, Osear 
Bendlcksen, N. 
Bengtsson, Albert 
Bensen, -143 
Be'nsen, B. 
Bensen, H. 
Benson, Richard 
Benson, -143 
Berg, Julius 
Joe 

Campbell, Geo. 
Carlsson, Carl 
Carlsson, C. J. 
Carlsson, G. A. 
< 'arnaghan, N. 
Carriek, Jas. B. 

nsen, M. F. 
Chrlstensen, Win. 



Anderson, H. A. 
Anderson, -1262 
Anderssen, -t.'.is 
Andreasen, M. 
Andersson, Albln 
Andersson, -1246 
rsson, Ernst 
Andersson. 1552 
Andreasen, 
Amtsen, Julian 
Aske, John 
Aspen, Knut 
Atkinson, Samuel 
Axels.11, Axel A. 
Aylward, .1 

Bernert, Fred 
Beyerle, Ruppert 
lark. ■Inn. l. Rasmuss 
Blair. Francis 
Blulim, Albert 
Bodungen, F. 
Boisen, J. 
Boogren, Eric 
Borgersen, Alf 
Borresen, Niels 
Boylan, C. J. 
Bowland, Chas. 
Bregler, Fred 
Brown, John 
Burdt, Paul 
Burke, Eugene 
Burmeister, T. F. 
Burnett, Chas. C. 

Christensen, Viggo 
Chrlstensen, M. H. 

Christoffersen, -614 
Christophersen, C. 
Clarke, R., -1117 
Clifton, Robert 
Corneliusen, Jens 
Courtney, Ed. 



Larsen, Lars I.indfors, Karl 

en, -1453 Lindholm, Erik 

Larsen, -1290 Lindkvist, -1014 

Larsen, -1842 Lindroos. Oscar 

Larsen, Anton C. M. Lindstrom, Anton 



Christensen, Carl E.Cullen, -1253 



Dahl, Olaf 
I 'ahlen, Hugo 
l»ahlgren, Edward 

n, F. 
.i.ii Iiaan, C. 
1 1. Santis, E. 
Dikender, M. 

Baston, R. W. 
Ekendahl, -565 
Ellefsen, Andreas 
Elliott, E. 
Engblom, John I-;. 
Engelg 

an, Chas. 

Erlksen, -595 
Erlksen, Leonard 

Faraghar, John 
Figved, Sigurd 
Flndley, n. 

ii, Jonas 
Korshu, A. 
Forsliind, Victor 
Forsman, Nils 
Foyn, Sam 
Frankovich, Alex 



Donnelly, M. 
Dories, H. 

1 inl sell. Elllil 

Dowe, John 

\v. 

Dryden, Wm. 
Dunn, C. Walter 

Erickson, Mike 
Erlckson, -493 
Erlksen, Edmund 
Erlksen, Anton 
Erikson, Samuel 
Eriksson, C. E. 
Esklldsen, N. P. 
Esnault, Geo. 
Bspensen, E. N. 

Fransen, Adolph 
Fransen, Gus 

Freeland, Karl 
Freiberg Peter 
Freidland, C. T. 
Friebel, Herman 
Frivold, John 
Frose, Elias 

i, Gustav 



Larsen, -644 
Larsen, Knut C. 
Larsen, Einar A. 
l.arsson, Efraim 
Lass, John 
Lausmann, John 
Laws. Harry 
Leahy, -92B 
Lenn, Tunny 
l.iljifalk, S. 
Bind, John 

Madsen, Thorolf 
Magnuson, Gust. 
Magnussen, Axel 

. son. F. W. 

Martinson, A. 

Mason, Chas. 
Mason, C. 
Mathiesen. Ingolf 
Mattson, K. J. 
Mayer, Peter 
McAdam, J. 
McCue, T. D. 
McGuire, John 

Nelson, Charles 
Nelson, Geo. 
Neater, Wilson 
Neumann, Aug. 
Nieolaisen, Otto 
Nicolaysen, H. 
Nielsen, Slvert 
Nielsen, Geo. 

i iberg, C. W. -790 
' I Keeffe, W. 
. Usen, Anton 
i Usen, Emil M. 
Olsen, Chas. 
Olsen, -966 
Olsen, A. H. 

Parikka, Herman 

Pearson. John S. 
Pedersen, Peder 
l edersen, Louis 
Pedersen, -1181 
Pedersen, -1006 
Pedersen, Carl C. 

en, -1093 
Pederson, L. R. 
Pendville, N. 

al. Wm. 
Persson, Chas. 
Petersen, -645 

Raahange, J. v. 
Rasmussen, -497 
Rasmussen, E. 
Kelnhold, Ernst 
Reinwald, Erik 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Rigoulot, Bert 
Hints, T. 
Roalsen, Fred E. 
Robertson, D. A. 
Robett, John D. 

■/., Vincent 
Sanders, Frank 
Sandow, Fred. 
Sandqvfst, C. G. E. 
Sawberg, A. 
er, Paul 

h. Magnus 
Schmehl, Jas. P. 
Schmidlen, -1987 
Schmidt. Alfred 
Schmidt, Fritz 

It. Franz 
Schultman, John 
Schultz, Fred 
Schumacher, Wm. 



Llnqulflt, Fred 
Loenecke, -1321 
Lopez, Francisco 
Lowena, J. 

Lucas. J. \V. 
Lukman, Ewald 

l.iin.l.'. < llaus M. 

gren, J. A. 
Lundln, Chas. 
Lynch, Peter 

McKenzie, John 
McKenzie. -1775 
McLean. John 
Melander, Gus. 
Mendiola, Joseph 
Me i .-nian. A. 
Meyer, Frank 
Meyers, Herman 
Micheli, Arthur 
Moller, Jens 
Mortimer, Ernst 
Munby, N. J. W. 
Murphy, Howard 

Nielsen. -SSI 

Nilsen, Fred 
Nilsen, Hans 
Nilsen, -784 
Nilsson. Nat. 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norton, Jack R. 
Nyman, Gus 

Olsen, Olaf 10 
■ ilaen, Boren 
Olsen, Jorgen 
Olson. -717 
Olsson. Wm. 
Oisson, -945 



.v.i 



Gad, Sophus 
Gallen, Robert 
Gardell, Chris, 
near I Gonzalez, Juan 
re, A. 
I lovan, A. 
Green. Hilding 
Grossl, M. M. 



Guillou, Joseph 
Gundersen, Johan 

Gundersen. -7sr, 
Gundersen, Jack 
Gundersen, Tandrup 
Cunderson, Christ 
liaison. John 
Joe Gunn, Bert 



i iuiltnansen, A. B. 

•nsen, M. 
I laasenritter, Carl 
i [agbartsen, M. 
Haier, Fred 
Hall, W. F. 

..in. John 
Halvorsen, Augen 
Halvorsen, Eugene 
Halvorsen, Hartvlg Henrlksen 
1 1. i-:. 

llanim. Edword 
Hammond, J. A. 

n, Marius 
Hansen. -1818 
Hansen, -1G38 
1 lansen, H. P. 
Hansen. Herman 
I lansen, Karl 



I lansen, C. J. 
1 lansen, J. P. 
Hanssen, Nikolai 
Hansson, L. I' • 
Harris, John E. 
Harris, J. 
Haugen, Lars 
Heesche, Heinri.h 
IT::? 
Henriksson, -1146 
Hess, August 
Mines, Jas. 
Hochmann, Aleck 

i.l. Odin 
Holland, E. Scott 
Hull. Hendrick 
Hustede, Helnrich 



Isaacson. Isaac 

son, Joe 
Jansen, Eilert 
.larvie, W. 
Jawi, A. 
Jensen, Jas. B. 

Niels E. 
Jensen, Carl 
Jensen, Jens P. 
Jensen, II. 
Jensen, -1634 
Jenson, Johannes 
Johannesen, J. 
Johansen, -1705 
Johansen, Sigurd 
Johansen, C. L. 
Johansen, Hjalmar 
Johansen, J. B. 
Johanson, S. 
Johanson, Theodor 
Johnsen, Edward 

Kaasik, A. 

tzer, Ferd 
Kalning. Jacob 
Kane, G. 
Karlgren, -644 
Koline. Ernst 
Kersteln, Carl 
Klint. Herman 
Karlsen, Karl J. 
Karlsson, C. E. 
Karlsson, N. 

Laantl, Moses 

berg, Chas. 
jren, J. A. 

Lang, Chas. 



Petersen, Bertel 
p.uersen, Carl 
Pettersen, Jens O. 
Petersen, -782 
l'etersen, Oscar C. 
Peterson, John 
Pilos, Louis 

POlSOn, Call 

Porter, C. 
Pratt, Fred 
Pratt, Louis 

Prigent. Jean 
Prinz, Chas. 

nes, Anfin 
Roll, August 

eck, Paul 
Rosenblad. -751 
Rosenvald, Isak 
Rosenqvist, H. A. 
Ruckle, Erwin 
Rud. Louis 
Rudberg C. 
Ryberg, Sverre 



w. 



Skyskan, M. 
Smith, John A 
Soderlund, A. 
Soedstrup, E. 
Sola. Emanuel 
Sonora, Wm. 
Sorensen, -1607 
Stack, Jacob 
Stander. Arthur 
Stange, -2063 
Staschau. Johan 
Steen, H. D. 
Steffens, D. 
Steinberg, Arthur 
Steine, -2120 



Sehwitzer. Herman Stone, Robert 



Itwelt, Fr. 

Johnsen, -1064 
Johnson, Gus. 
Johnson, -1877 
Johnson, Hjalmar 
Johnson, Nils L. 
Johnson, -393 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, G. Edwin 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Chas. 
Johnson, J. E. 
Jones, Magnus P. 
Jones, P. 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen, -1868 
Jorgensen, Joh 
Joseph, Jack 
Julinssen, Carl 
Jurgensen, H. 
Justersen, Peter 

Koso, Pet 
Knndsen, David J 
Knudsen, Lauritz 
Krauschat, A. 
Kiistensen. -1088 
K lis toff ersen. Karl 
Kenny, G. 

kristot'fei-sen, (I. T. 
Kugam, Fred J. 

Kuil.'.lt. Wm. 

I .angvardt, Chris 
Lantz, Gustaf 
Larsen, -1271 
Larsen, Ludv. J. 



Seegers, Wm. 
Semberg, John 
Shannon, H. C. 
Shifter, Chas. R. 
Sigurd, Gustaf 
Simpson, L. C. 
Smdahl, Jens 
Slven, Viktor 
Sivertsen, Geo. 
Sjogren, K. A. 
Sjoblom, Anton 

T.-imm, A. 
Tauson. R. 
Teitzen, B. H. 
Templeman, R. 
Theorin, J. .in. B 
Thomal, 
Thomas, Frank 
Thomson, Hans 

r.Ma. Ole 

Veiss, -1107 

Vlrak, M. 

Von den Steene, J. 

Vongehr, Ewald 

Wahi, J. 
Waldo, Wm. 

Wells, Leo L. 
Wahlberg, Rudolf 
Wallin. John 
Wasenius, Sigurd 
Wells, Geo. 

i berg, N. G. 
Westerlund, Paul 

fount;, R. 

Zarnow, Otto 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Nils. 
Anderson, Axel. 
Andersson, -907 
Andersson, -1447 
Bertelsen, -1223 
Boysen, P. A. 
Carlson, Leo 
Christensen, 
Christensen, 

' 'a l Im.11, K. E 

Emanuelsen, A. 

I-.liasen,- E. 
Fllingsen. J. 

Coster, O. 

Hope, Ole 

lleiiilrieksen, H. R 
Hansen, Lars. 
Johannesen, M. E. 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Nils 
Jalonen, J. 
Kjellgreen, A 
Lau. G. 
Liliebeck, C. 
Lewis, J. M. 
Lunder, B. 
Le Goffie, W. 



Morris, L. 

Markham, H. 

Mattson. W. 

Mail. ohm. H. 

Nilson, Karl 

Ollgreen, K. 

Olsen, E. -515 
AndersPettersen, -1154 
178 Petterson, -1037 

P.ytko, O. -716 

Raymond, L. 

Squires, F. 

Smith, J c 

Swenson. Ben 

Stender. A. 

Storviek, I. 

Saar. II. 

Solberg, O. 

Simon, A. 

Utby, Carl 

Vongher, E. 

Viereek. H. 

Westburn, T. 

Weekauf, II. 

Werner. E. 
Well, L. 
Westergren, 






B. 



Ch. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Allen, Fred Ingebretsen, Carl -69 

Andersen, Carl -1537 Kelly, John 
Anderson, Albert B. Kloot, J. 

-1568 Kolp, Otto Louis 

Anderson, Martin Kruger, Gustav 



-38 
Barnard, C. 
Benson, Fred 
Blumer, Mase 
Brooker, F. 
Carlson, Chas 
Cottin, Albert 
Eklund, Aug. 
Eliasen, Carl 
Guyader, Georges 
Haltnes, Magnus 
Johanson, K. 

-1396 



Lowe, John A. 
Madsen, G. F. -1677 
McDonough, Ed. 
McFarlane 
Molen, D. V. D. 
1087 Nilson, Alf. 
Olsen, Martin 
Olsen, Carl -908 
Petersen, Chas. -172 
Lundquist, Walter 
W. 
J Webber, John 
W.ilsen, Alfred 



Honolulu, H. T. Letter List. 



Andersen, F. C. 
Andersen. A. L. 
Andersen, Einar 
Clahsen. H. 
Campbell, N. 



Ferraris, J. 
Holm, J. 

Janssen, H. -1555 
Helinor, Belin J. 
Thomas, J. W. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Strand, -1786 
Suaminen, O. 
Sund, Alecks 
Sundman, Gus. 
Svendsen, -1050 
Svendsen, Olaf 
Svensson, Nik 
Swanson, J. 
Swanson, Hugo 
Swensen, Carl 



Thoresen, Th. A. 

Thorn. Arvi.l 

Tillman, A. E. 
TJellman, Jonas 
Tofte, H. 
Torgensen, Peter 

Tieiidle, Louie 
Tyson, Wm. W. 

T'lstad, Kristian 

von Villcmayor. W. 
Vortmann, Wm. 
Vucic, V. 



Winters, C. J. 
Welsen, Julius 
Wlkstrom, H. H. E. 
Wilde, Herman 
Wilson, Herman 
Winter. Gotthard 
Wlnther, Hans 
Wlrak, Hugo 
Worm, A. 



Zebe, Gustav 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Andersen, A. C.-1108 Johansen, A. -1705 
Carnaghan. Win. Lillie, F. P. 

I asig. Don. McCoy, Chas. 

Larsen, Lars Schmehl, J. P. 

Heller, Olaf Thomson, Carl 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Anderson, Olaf 
Anderson, S. 
Arinmi. Walter 
Bastrom, C. 

Christensen. E. H. 

Gustafson, Edward 
Gunther, Theo. 
Isaa.s.m, Gustave 
Johnsen, J. -25 

Karlsson, E. 

a, J acob E. 
Larsen, M. 
Lorensen. O. C. 
Micheli, Agagtina 



Metteineijer. J. F. 

M.ieis, uaii.i. Gastan 
Niccolie, Sant. 
Nilsen, Ruder 
Nylan.l, Sven 
Oman, Victor 
Plattner, Fred 
Pateejanske, R. 
Shuels, Christ. 
Skutul. A. 
Simpson, Lewis C. 
Svensen. ( (laf 
Teigland. G. 
Thortensen, Peter 



llenrik Jacob Syberg, born 1867, in 
Jylland, Denmark, supposed to be on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for. Ad- 
dress, Vice Consulate of Norway, 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Edman Hetman Hanson, a native of 
Tromso, Norway, last heard from in 
Adelaide, Australia, is inquired for by 
his brother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Ole J. Andersen, or Danielsen, a 
native of Kristiania, Norway, born 
May 23, 1867, is inquired for by his 
father. Address, Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 

Peter Hansen, who swore to a com- 
plaint against the master of "Cecelia 
Sudden" last October, is inquired for 
by the United States attorney at Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Ole Hansen Stallemo, last heard of 
on bark Edderside in 1896, is inquired 
for by his sister, Juga Hendricks. Ad- 
dress, 405 Ohio street, 3d floor, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Vicktor L. Brelin, last heard of 
when sailing on the Australian coast 
in 1904, is inquired for by h : s brother. 
Address, A. E. Brelin, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco. 

Karl Kristopherson, born 1881, at 
Karlskrona, Sweden, is inquired for 
by his brother, Alfred. Address, At- 
lantic Coast Seamen's Union, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Carl Johan Olsen, a native of Chris- 
tiansund, Norway, once a member of 
the Pacific Coast Seamen's Union, is 
inquired for by his sister, Mrs. B. 
M. Thalberg, nee Olsen, 719 N. Maple- 
wood avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Anders or Andrew Olson, a native 
of Lomma, near Malmo, Sweden, aged 
about 40, joined the Sailors' Union in 
San Francisco about 1892, is inquired 
for by Nils P. Adamson, Keeper El- 
dred Rock Light Station, Via Juneau, 
Alaska. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

' a Specialty. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 
E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 199 Steuart St. 



THE HARRISON 

Newly furnished rooms. 

456 HARRISON ST., Corner First, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Hot and cold running water in 
every room; electric lighted and free 
baths. Terms $1.50 per week up. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bell, and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

5 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Guaranteed Capital $ 1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,453,983.62 

Deposits, June 30, 1908 34,474,554.23 

Total Assets 37,055,263.31 

Remittances may be made by Draft, 
Post Office, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 
o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from V 
o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. for receipt 
of deposits only. 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Edmund Zink, sailing on the Pa- 
cific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Olaf Johanneson, a native of Sei- 
desfjord, Iceland, last heard of on the 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address S. J. Westdal, 51 
South street, New York City. 

Henry Laurent, who has been sail- 
ing between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 

CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



SOMETHING NEW 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE NICOTINE DESTROYER 

"ANTIDOTE," the Catalytic Pipe has Four 
Important Advantages which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

_ 1. The "ANTIDOTE" needs No Break- 
ing in. Every smoker knows the terrors 
of the first few smokes in an ordinary 
Pipe. The First Smoke in an "ANTI- 
DOTE" is as sweet as an ordinary 
Pipe sweetened by Long Usage. 

2. The "ANTIDOTE" can not 
burn out. The Catalytic lining pro- 
tects the briar. 

3. The "ANTIDOTE" is always 
Dry even with constant smoking 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scien- 
tifically destroys the Nicotine, 
making it evaporate. A por- 
ous lining filled with Coal Tar 
Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 




placed in 
the bowl 
of a briar 
pipe, this is 
called the 
Catalyser; the 
smoke passing 
over the Cata- 
lyser produces 
Formol. This For- 
mol turns all the 
moisture and Nico- 
tine into steam, caus- 
ing it to pass off into 
the air and evaporate. 
All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes 
are hand made, of the 
Best French Briar. 

KASSER BROS. 

Distributors 
19 MARKET STREET 
S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 



Buy Your 

Clothing, Hats 
and Shoes 

From 

C. J. SWANSON 

Oilskins, Rubberboots, Suit- 
cases, Trunks, Valises, 
Bedding, Pillows and 
Blankets 

STYLISH GOODS 
LOW PRICES 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

119 EAST ST. 

Between Washington and %$m 
Merchant Streets 

San Francisco ,~ 

Suits Made to Order. 




INFORMATION WANTED. 



Wilhelm Schumacher, a native of 
Duisburg-Ruhrort, Germany, is in 
quired for by the German Consul, 51 
Third street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, a member 
of the Sailors' Union -of the Pacific is 
inquired for by his father. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Charles Porter, Fred Choate and 
Soren Sorensen, who were wrecked in 
the Maggie C. Russ, are requested to 
call upon Attorney H. W. Hutton, 
Pacific Building, San Francisco. 

Charles Johannes, a native of Ber- 
lin, Ontario, aged about 35, supposed 
to be on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 




Count Leo Tolstoi has been elected 
to honorary membership in the faculty 
of the University of St. Petersburg. 

A great festival was held at Lima, 
Peru, on September 13 on the oc- 
casion of the inauguration of the 
Cuzco Railway. 

The Danish Premier, J. C. Chris 
tensen, recently handed the Cabinet's 
resignation to the King in accord- 
ance with his demand. 

Eight Russian policemen were sen- 
tenced to six years' penal servitude 
at St. Petersburg on September 20 
for beating a prisoner to death. 

The central telephone building and 
Postoffice at Paris, France, were de- 
stroyed by fire on September 19. The 
loss is estimated at $5,000,000. 

Five men were killed and sixteen 
others injured by a boiler explosion 
in the Laura mine, near Heerlen, on 
the Dutch border on September 15. 

A famine is threatened in China, in 
the region between the river and the 
Great Wall as a result of floods which 
are destroying the rice crops. 

A hurricane of great fury swept 
over Turks Islands, British West In- 
dies, on September 10, and the town 
of Grand Turk was devastated. A 
number of lives have been lost. 

There were sixty-six suicide cases 
in St. Petersburg, Russia, in one 
week recently. A large proportion of 
that number were working girls be- 
tween the ages of 18 and 25 years. 

The Australian Premier, Alfred 
Deakin, is taking steps to induce the 
British Government to dispatch a fleet 
to Australia as soon as that can be 
conveniently done. 

A violent earthquake shock was ex- 
perienced at Guayaquil, Ecuador, on 
September 17. It caused a great panic 
among the people, but there was no 
loss of life and the resultant damage 
was trifling. 

A sergeant of police and six war- 
dens of the prison at Dorpot, Russia, 
were convicted of torturing political 
prisoners with the idea of extorting 
confession, and each was sentenced 
to one year's imprisonment. 

The Journal of Trade and Industry 
announces that the South Russian 
Metallurgical Trust has signed ar- 
ticles abroad, although the Govern- 
ment's permission to operate in Rus- 
sia has not yet been obtained. 

Louis A. Gregori was acquitted at 
Paris, France, on September 11, of 
the charge of attempting to kill 
Major Alfred Dreyfus at the Pan- 
theon during the ceremonies in con- 
nection with the canonization of 
Emile Zola. 

The most powerful warship ever 
built was launched at Newcastle, 
Eng., on September 10 for Brazil. 
When completed the vessel will have 
a displacement approaching 20,000 
tons, and she will carry a main arma- 
ment of twelve 12-inch guns. 

The Asiatic cholera has taken a 
strong foothold in the garrisons of St. 
Petersburg and 400 soldiers have been 
stricken. In the twenty-four hours 
ending at noon on September 18 there 
were 395 new cases of civilians and 126 
deaths from cholera in the capital. 

Order has so far been restored in 
the Baltic provinces, the seat of the 
great insurrection of 1905, that the 
Russian Government is contemplating 
the abolition of martial law with the 
law of "reinforced security," passing 
over the intermediate code of "extra- 
ordinary security" such as now pre- 
vails in St. Petersburg and Moscow. 



16 



C< >AST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



"Well, Pat, after a year at the auto- 
mobile school, I suppose you under- 
stand everything?" "All but one 
thing, sir." "What's that?" "What 
makes the thing go without horses?" 



A Wonderful Man.— "Shakespeare 
wrote for all time." 

"For instance?" 

"Take his expression: "Tis not so 
deep as a well, nor so wide as a barn 
door, yet 'twill serve.' How well that 
describes a 191)8 spring hat!"— Ex- 
change. 



Do You Know.— There was once a 
blind carpenter who picked up a ham- 
mer, and saw. Then there was the 
deaf shepherd, who went out with his 
flocks, and herd. But the greatest 
miracle of all was the case of the 
dumb wheelwright, who reached out 
for a tire, and spoke.— Exchange. 



A Wall Flower.— "Nobody danced 
with Marcella Squawk at the ball last 
night." 

"That's funny. Day before yester- 
day she showed me a long list of 
young men who had pledged her their 
dances." 

"Yes, but they all stayed away." 



Mrs. Pacer-Scott's face, while he 
had been speaking, had undergone a 
complete transformation, from pa- 
thetic appeal to smiling confidence. 

"How splendid!" she exclaimed. "It 
was worth while deceiving me for 
this. But—" She looked at him 
fixedly. There was in her eyes a new 
trouble. "You are not going to hold 
me to that promise, are you?" 

"What do you mean?" 

Mrs. Pacer-Scott pushed the two 
checks toward him. 

"Now, Jack," she said, "please for- 
get the silly way I acted, and buy 
me 200 shares of copper at once— 
won't you?" — Thomas Masson. 



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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXII, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 



Whole No. 1084. 



ATLANTIC SEAMEN ON MANNING. 






RECENTLY the Journal published the state- 
ment presented by the International Sea- 
men's Union of America to the Commission 
on Safety of Life at Sea, now in session at Wash- 
ington, D. C. In addition to that statement, tes- 
timony bearing upon the subject has been sub- 
mitted by several local unions affiliated with the 
International. Among the latter is the statement 
submitted by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
which is herewith published in full: 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union. 

Boston, Mass., August 25, 1908. 

W. Strother Smith, Acting Recorder, 

Commission on the Revision of the Laws 
Relative to Safety of Life at Sea, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Dear Sir: — In accordance with your circular 
letter of May 12 last, we take the liberty of sub- 
mitting for the consideration of the above-named 
Commission, in behalf of the Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, the following memoranda pertinent 
to the questions involved: 

Manning and Efficiency. 

The sole and only provision found in the 
Statutes of the United States governing this most 
important subject is contained in the recent 
amendment .to, or substitute for, Section 4463, 
Rev. Stat. This section now reads as follows: 

"Sec. 4463. Any vessel of the United States 
subject to the provisions of this title or to the 
inspection laws of the United States shall not be 
navigated unless she shall have in her service and 
on board such complement of licensed officers 
and crew as may, in the judgment of the local in- 
spectors who inspect the vessel, be necessary for 
her safe navigation. The local inspectors shall 
make in the certificate of inspection of the vessel 
an entry of such complement of officers and crew, 
which may be changed from time to time by 
indorsement of such certificate by local inspec- 
tors by reason of change of conditions or em- 
ployment. Such entry or indorsement shall be 
subject to a right of appeal, under regulations 
to be made by the Secretary of Commerce and 
Labor, to the Supervising Inspector and from him 
to the Supervising Inspector-General, who shall 
have the power to revise, set aside, or affirm the 
said determination of the local inspectors. 

"If any such vessel is deprived of the services 
of any member of the crew without the consent, 
fault, or collusion of the master, owner, or any 
person interested in the vessel, the vessel may 
proceed on her voyage, if in the judgment of 
the master she is sufficiently manned for the 
voyage. 

"If the master shall fail to explain in writing 
such deficiency in the crew to the local inspec- 
tors within twelve hours of the time of the ar- 
rival of the vessel at her destination, he shall be 
liable to a penalty of fifty dollars. If the vessel 
shall have been insufficiently manned in the 
judgment of the local inspectors, the master shall 
be liable to a penalty of one hundred dollars, 
or in case of an insufficient number of licensed 
officers to a penalty of five hundred dollars." 
It is difficult to conceive of anything upon 



which the safety of life at sea is more dependent 
than the proper manning of vessels and the effi- 
ciency of their crews. Both their manning and 
the efficiency of the men that man them are in- 
separably linked together; neither is of any avail 
without the other. Hence an Act that provides, 
as does the above, for the manning of the vessel 
but is absolutely silent as to the efficiency, quali- 
fications, skill, etc., of the men who man the ves- 
sel, is but a short step forward toward the better 
protection and safety of human life at sea. 

The Act above quoted went into effect July 1 
last and has not yet been judicially construed by 
the courts. It provides, among other things, that 
"no vessel subject to the provisions of this title 
or to the inspection laws of the United States 
shall be navigated unless she shall have in her 
service and on board such COMPLEMENT of 
licensed officers and crew as may, in the judg- 
ment of the local inspectors who inspect the ves- 
sel, be necessary for her safe navigation." This, 
of course, gives the inspectors the right to de- 
termine what the crew of a vessel shall consist 
of numerically; but can the word "COMPLE- 
MENT" be construed to also give the inspectors 
the further power of determining what shall be 
the standard of efficiency of the crew? Without 
such power being lodged in the -hands of the in- 
spectors, it is submitted that all benefit and all 
protection to life at sen that would otherwise 
be derived from this Act is lost, and as far as 
the proper manning of an American vessel is 
concerned the Act is practically worthless. 

The necessity of a specific provision in the Act, 
empowering the inspectors to regulate the effi- 
ciency as well as the manning of American ves- 
sels is forcibly illustrated in the case of the 
steamer City of Rio de Janeiro, recently decided 
in the United States Circuit Court of Appeals, 
Ninth Circuit, and afterward affirmed by the 
United States Supreme Court. We quote from 
the decision of the Court of Appeals: 

"The steamship City of Rio de Janeiro, whose 
home port was San Francisco, on entering the har- 
bor of San Francisco on the 22d day of February, 
1901, on one of her return trips from Hong Kong 
and intermediate ports, struck a reef of rocks 
near the Golden Gate, and within twenty minutes 
sank beneath the waters, carrying down a large 
number of passengers and crew, and all her cargo. 
The record shows that the disaster occurred 
about half past five in the morning. * * * The 
fog was so dense that the day afforded no light. 
It was very dark, but the water was smooth, and 
there was little, if any list to the ship as she 
sank. * * * She carried 211 persons and eleven 
lifeboats, three of which were swung by davits 
from the sides of the ship, and eight were on skids 
on the roof of the deck-house. The equipment and 
apparatus for launching them was good. The 
evidence is that under such conditions five min- 
utes was ample time for the lowering of the boats. 
It further shows that there was no panic among 
the passengers or crew; that the passengers be- 
haved well and that the captain, immediately 
upon the ship striking the rocks, sounded the 
alarm and called the crew to the boats. Each 
of the boats was commanded by a white officer 
and manned by a part of the Chinese crew. Yet 
but three of the eleven boats weir lowered into 
the water, one of which (the aft quarter boat, 



number 10) was lowered by Officer Coghlan and 
the ship's carpenter, and but three of the hundred 
and odd passengers that the ship carried were 
taken into any boat. * * * 

"The case shows that the City of Rio de 
Janeiro left the port of Honolulu on the voyage 
under consideration with a crew of 84 Chinamen, 
officered by white men. The officers could not 
speak the language of the Chinese, and but two of 
the latter — the boatswain and the chief fireman — 
could understand that of the officers. Conse- 
quently the orders of the officers had to be com- 
municated either through the boatswain or the 
chief fireman, or by signs and signals. So far as 
it appears, that seems to have worked well enough 
on the voyage in question, until the ship came to 
grief and there arose the necessity for quick and 
energetic action in the darkness. In that emer- 
fency the crew was WHOLLY INEFFICIENT 
AND INCOMPETENT, as the sad results 
proved. The boats were in separate places on the 
ship; the sailors could not understand the lan- 
guage in which the orders of the officers in com- 
mand of the respective boats had to be given; it 
was too~dark for them to see signs (if signs could 
have been intelligently given, and only one of the 
two Chinese who spoke English appears to have 
known anything about the lowering of a boat; 
and there had been no drill of the crew in the 
matter of lowering them. Under such circum- 
stances it is not surprising that but three of the 
boats were lowered. One of them was success- 
fully launched by Officer Coghlan and the ship's 
carpenter, another of which was swamped by 
one of the Chinese crew letting the after fall 
down by the run, and the third of which was 
lowered so slowly that it was swamped as the 
ship went down." 

"We have no hesitation in holding," said the 
Court of Appeals in this case, "that the ship was 
insufficiently manned, for the reason that the 
sailors were unable to understand and execute 
the orders made imperative by the exigency that 
unhappily arose and resulted so disastrously to 
life as well as property." Opinion filed May 9, 
1904. 

The foregoing specifically illustrates the point 
in question and shows the absolute inadequacy 
of an Act which merely provides for a sufficient 
NUMBER of seamen regardless of the EFFI- 
CIENCY of the men. A given vessel with a 
sufficient number of seamen, and perhaps even 
an adequate totality of skill, IF IT WERE 
AVAILABLE IN ALL EMERGENCIES, is 
nevertheless unsafe at sea— she is nevertheless 
undermanned — if her seamen arc unable to under 
stand orders, for such inability makes them 
wholly or in part UNAVAILABLE in the hour 
of peril. 

The case of the steamship Clallam, which 
foundered in the Straits of Juan de Fuca on 
January 8, 1904, carrying fifty human beings to 
the bottom with her, points the same le 
Numerically her crew was sufficient, but they 
were not skilled. She was sufficiently equipped 
with boats; she filled slowly; there was an 
abundance of time between the obviousness of 
the foundering and the actual sinking to have 
permitted the lowering of all boats and the saving 
of every life on board. Want of skill and 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MAROONED. 



It was Robinson Crusoe, I believe, who 
proudly boasted that he was monarch of all 
he surveyed. This terse word-picture of 
grandiose loneliness comes pretty doggone 
nigh fitting my case at this writing; so nigh, 
in fact, that I am not at all sure that old 
Crusoe had anything on me in that line. 
For one thing, he was too blessed busy 
rooting for something to eat to do much 
surveying. For another, he had, of course, 
occasionally to defer a little something or 
other to the co-ordinate branch of the gov- 
ernment, his Man Friday. 

Now, time with me is a matter of no con- 
cern whatever, except perhaps, what to do 
with it all ; while, so far as the monarch 
business goes, I am the whole cheese, an ab- 
solute autocrat, with none to say me nay 
when I feel like bossing things a little. Be- 
sides, I don't have to climb a tree of a night 
and sleep in the branches. My kingdom is 
as free from snakes and other obnoxious 
critters as old Erin itself. 

My "kingdom," by the way, is an old 
ballahoo of a bark anchored out in San 
Francisco Bay about a mile and half from 
anywhere. I am ship-keeper — captain, mate, 
all hands and the cook fused into one, and 
the best man on board that ship, I can assure 
you, bullies. And, say, fellow rope-haulers, 
I am, with a record of nearly forty years 
before the mast, taking mine ease in the 
captain's state-room, sleeping in his nibs' 
bunk at night, and actually writing this 
stuff on the desk where the late gorramighty 
used to pucker his brow over logarithms, 
manifests, charts, and various other aids to 
navigation and commerce! Can you beat it, 
you common sailors? 

Sometimes when I wake up in the morn- 
ing and look around me I forget myself, and 
unconsciously open my lips in an inchoate 
effort to holler: "Steward, bring me my 
coffee." It is only after I have sat up in 
bed a minute or so, and rubbed the sleep out 
of my eyes with my knuckles, that I begin 
to collect my wits and say to myself: "Hey, 
cook, you lazy devil ; get up and light the 
fire and get breakfast under way." And into 
the galley I scoot, whistling "Hotcakes for 
me, Johnny" (no whisky in mine, you rum- 
mies), while I stir the batter and grease the 
skillet. Before the average woman would 
be done untying the curl papers in her hair 
I have a. slap-up breakfast set out on the 
cabin table. It takes a sailor to give a 
woman points on cooking while you wait. 

While rummaging around in the lazarette 
one day I discovered a barrel half full of salt 
horse of good quality and in excellent condi- 
tion. Now, don't be smacking your lips, 
boys; it won't do you any good. There is 
only just enough salt horse in that barrel to 
last your Uncle Bill six months; so, of 
course, I can't afford to give any of it away. 
Why, if I had discovered a gold mine I 
wouldn't have felt more elated than I did 
when I ran across that salt horse. Before I 
knew it almost I found myself, in conform- 
ity with a hoary forecastle custom, apostro- 
phizing the dear old junk thusly: 

Salt horse, salt horse! what brought you hi 
From Tarrytown to Portland Pier 
You've carted stone this many a year; 
Till, killed by work and sore abuse, 
They salted you down for sailors' use; 
They gnaw your bones and damn your eyes, 
And wish you were in hell — likewise 
The souls of all ship-chandlers who 
Have ever sold the likes of you. 
Giddap, Dobbin! 



Sailormen will understand my elation. As 
every sea-cook and son of a sea-cook who 
goes to sea, knows, when it comes to cook- 
ing those tasty, old-fashioned delicacies and 
stand-bys of seafaring cuisine — lobscouse, 
sea-pie, and cracker-hash — fresh beef is sim- 
ply not in it with salt horse ; it hasn't got 
the llavor, and certainly not the strength, 
of salt horse — particularly not the strength. 
No, sirree; away with your chicken sautes, 
your goulashes, and your fresh beef mulli- 
gan stews ! Give me lobscouse or sea-pie 
made of good old salt horse. That's the 
stuff to put hair on an able seaman's breast, 
and strength in his arms to pull ropes with. 
And you can bet your next pay-day, bullies, 
that 1 get enough of it these days. What! 
That old rhyme about "pork and peas as 
much as you please; of beef and duff not half 
enough" doesn't apply to this hombre any 
more. The reverse of its sense would come 
nearer the mark at present. 

Having been dragged up, and having 
spent more than two-thirds of my life, in 
that end of the ship, it goes without saying 
that about the first thing I did after coming 
on board was to pay a visit to the forecastle. 
It is of the usual type found on American 
deepwatermen, neither better nor worse 
than the average. It is situated in the fore- 
part of the forward house. The single door 
of the place opens out just abaft the fore- 
mast. Hence, when the vessel is sailing on 
the wind, it must be kept constantly closed to 
keep out the water. There is no skylight or 
ventilation connected with the place; only 
two small ports, one on each side, about 
four inches in diameter. With the door and 
weather port having to be kept closed at 
sea most of the time, all the light and venti- 
lation must come through the lee port, a 
hole just big enough for a man to poke his 
fist through. 

What particularly impressed me about the 
shebang was the fact that there are only six 
bunks in it, two of which are thwartship 
ones. That is, she carries only six hands 
before the mast, though a vessel registering 
approximately eight hundred tons, and pre- 
senting every appearance of being what 
sailors term "heavy." That means, of course, 
that watch-and-watch at sea is out of the 
question, except in the very finest kind of 
weather. As I stood in that dingy, dark, 
dismal doghole, destitute of every comfort 
and convenience found in the poorest 10-cent 
lodging-house ashore, I could not help mut- 
tering: "Is it any wonder that American 
sailors growl? Is it any wonder that the 
American boy, knowing how our national 
standard of living has been raised in the last 
thirty years, won't go to sea? Put a hog in 
a pen like this and he would grunt, for even 
a pig will not thrive without light and venti- 
lation." Then I fell to thinking on the 
durned fools who preach the gospel of "the 
strenuous life" in the sense of "roughing it." 
"Roughing it" is all right as an abstract 
proposition, and is even beneficial as an oc- 
casional change from the racket of civilized 
existence as we know it to-day. But, when 
it gets to be "the whole shooting match" 
(vide "Uncle Joe" Cannon on organized 
labor), as in the case of life before the mast, 
it is apt to become decidedly monotonous, 
and must in the long run tend to coarsen a 
man's mind and manners. 

The bark herself, although pitted and 
scarred and dented all over from age and 
hard usage, "still retains traces of former 



beauty," as Laura Jane Libbey might have 
put it. In other words, she was a "flash 
packet" in her young days, as is further 
evidenced by the many remnants of "fancy 
work" to be seen around her decks. Con- 
sidering that she has always been under- 
manned, that means that she was a "floating 
workhouse" in those days of a kind well but 
not favorably known to seamen. It is even 
probable that on her record she would be 
eligible for mention in the "Red Record," 
had the writer of that interesting "muck- 
rake" compilation seen fit to make it more 
comprehensive in scope. An undermanned 
"flash packet" carries within herself all the 
elements which go to make up the tragedies 
that once made American ships hated and 
feared by seamen of all nations. 

From a number of old log-books left be- 
hind by former masters I find that she has 
been quite a globe-girdler in her day. The 
following are some of the ports she has 
traded to: Sitka, Honolulu, Callao, Valpa- 
raiso, Montevideo, Buenos Ayres, Rosario, 
Santos, Rio de Janeiro, New York, Liver- 
pool, London, Hamburg, Havre, Antwerp, 
Cape Town, Calcutta, Hongkong, Sydney, 
Melbourne, Hakodate, Shanghai and many 
others too numerous to mention. I also find 
that she has been dismasted in toto and in 
part at various times, and has lost several 
men overboard during her lifetime. In short, 
those log-books contain enough material to 
last an imaginative writer of sea stories a 
year. 

But, alas and alack ! like many a human 
who "has seen better days," the old girl 
took to drink in her declining years, so they 
had to put a windmill pump into her to keep 
her from getting full on the sly. And if a 
friend in need is a friend indeed that wind- 
mill pump is certainly a friend of mine. It 
does my heart good to watch it go round, 
doing more pumping in one hour than I 
could do in twenty-four; for, like every 
other sailor, if there is one thing I dislike 
above any other it is to pump a leaky ship 
by hand. About twenty years ago I went 
from Baltimore to Boston in an old barken- 
tine loaded with coal, and leaking like a 
sieve. Going up the Coast we struck the 
butt end of a southeaster, with a heavy sea, 
which opened her seams still more. When 
off Barnegat there were five feet of water 
in her. We went aft to the skipper, an old 
Down Easter looking like the conventional 
Uncle Sam, and told him that we'd see 
him in Jericho before we would do any more 
pumping, and suggested that he keep her 
away for New York. The old tarrier stroked 
his goatee reflectively, squirted some tobacco 
juice over the lee rail, and drawled: 

"So; you won't pump any more, eh? 
Waal, you can throw the pump brakes over- 
board for aught I care. I guess I have as 
many friends in hell as any of you fellows. 
But to Boston she goes — or down." 

And to Boston we went in her. When 
we arrived there she had eight feet of water 
in her hold, and we had been pumping 
steady for seventy-eight hours without a 
wink of sleep. The worst of the joke was 
that we had only eighteen dollars a month, 
for there was no sailor's union on the Atlan- 
tic Coast in those days. 

But, I can see my finish with the editor 
if I keep backing and filling this way much 
longer, so before he turns me down I'll go 
and turn into my bunk. 

Belay all; go below the watch! 

El Tuerto. 



1 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




WRECK OF THE YUMURI 



News of a definite nature regarding the 
violence of the hurricane that swept over the 
Bahama Islands on September 12 and suc- 
ceeding dates, and which is reported to have 
destroyed the town of St. Matthew on 
Inagua Island, reached New York on Sep- 
tember 20, when the shipwrecked crew of 
the Norwegian fruit steamer Yumuri were 
brought into port on the Dutch steamer 
Prins Wilhelm I, which rescued them from 
Castle Island on September 15. Captain A. 
Engebrethsen of the Yumuri, which was lost 
in the hurricane, and 14 of his crew were on 
the Dutch steamer. 

Captain Engebrethsen described the voy- 
age of his steamer as follows : 

"We left Port Antonio on September 10 
at noon with fine weather. About 1 o'clock 
on the morning of the 11th, when off Capt 
Maysi, the wind shifted to the north and 
began blowing a gale. All the time the 
barometer was slowly falling, indicating that 
we were in for even a more severe storm 
than was then raging. At noon of the 11th 
we were 84 miles southeast of Castle Island, 
when the wind increased to such violence 
that the hatches were closed and covered 
with tarpaulins. It was necessary to run 
at half speed and the steam whistle was kept 
blowing all the time. At 4 o'clock in the 
afternoon we were 54 miles from Castle 
Island and at 8 o'clock 38 miles distant, 
showing at what reduced speed we were 
running. 

"The wind at midnight turned west and 
we were unable to steer the ship with any 
exactness. Half-speed astern was tried for 
two hours, as I was afraid we would be 
driven onto the rocks west of Castle Island. 

"The seas constantly came on board and 
despite the continuous working of the steam 
pump the hold became filled with water. I 
kept the crew bailing the water out with 
buckets all during the night. There was no 
sleep for any one and conditions kept grow- 
ing worse every minute until the vessel was 
in such a state that there was danger of her 
going down. 

"But the first day and' night of the storm 
were as nothing compared to Saturday, the 
12th. The wind increased every minute and 
at 9 o'clock Saturday morning the seas be- 
came so high that they practically engulfed 
the steamer. The fires were put out by 
water, and this of course stopped the en- 
gines, so we were completely at the mercy 
of the storm. 

"It was blowing and raining so hard and 
the waves were running so high that it was 
impossible to stay on deck. All we could do 
was to lock ourselves beneath the hatches 
and pray for delivery. 

"About 2 o'clock on the afternoon of the 
12th the steamer touched the rocks and 15 
minutes later smashed with great force 
against them. The port lifeboats were 
ground to pieces. 

"It meant death to stay where we were, 
so I called all hands on deck and had each 
man put a life-preserver on. The ship was 
pounding on the bottom and the waves were 
washing over the deck, but we managed to 
make the starboard lifeboats ready to lower. 

"All hands were on the bridge, as far out 



of reach of the waves as it was possible to 
get, when the steamer struck hard on the 
bottom. We seemed to go over a bar or 
ledge of rock and then continued to drive in 
toward shore, striking the bottom time and 
again. We were close in and had about de- 
cided to take to the lifeboats, when they 
were smashed to pieces as the others had 
been. 

"The vessel was about two ship lengths 
from shore when she became stranded. On 
striking, the amidships portion was totally 
washed away and we fled to the forecastle. 
There we remained the whole night through, 
fearing every minute that the rest of the ves- 
sel would go to pieces. 

"On Sunday morning the hurricane was 
still blowing, and at 10 o'clock the rest of 
the hull broke up and we had to jump into 
the water and swim for shore. I was hurled 
against the rocks by the waves when near 
shore and rendered unconscious, but my men 
rescued me and we all reached shore safely. 
It seems little short of a miracle that we did 
so. 

"Our chief engineer was injured in the 
breast by being smashed against a rock and 
he also was unconscious when hauled ashore. 

"After gathering all hands we went along 
the shore about two miles until we came to 
the Castle Island lighthouse. We were 
famished and exhausted. The keeper took 
us in and treated us as well as he could with 
the small quarters and short supply of pro- 
visions he had. The tower was open at the 
top, so that the drenching rain came in, but 
we were somewhat sheltered from the ter- 
rific wind. As tired as we were we could 
not rest that night and the chief officer of 
crew fell ill from exposure. 

"My head also troubled me so we spent 
the night in great misery and discomfort. 

"It was not until Tuesday that the Prins 
Wilhelm sighted our signal and rescued 
us. One of my men refused to leave Castle 
Island, saying he had been too near death 
to tempt providence again. The rest of us, 
however, were mighty glad to be rescued. 
The lighthouse keeper promised to take care 
of the man who remained behind." 

Captain Engebrethsen said that the crew 
of the Prins Wilhelm deserved great credit 
for rescuing himself and men. The lifeboat 
made three trips between the steamer and 
shore, and once it was tossed high on the 
beach by the surf. 

The Prins Wilhelm had a rough voyage 
before she arrived off Castle Island, having 
been driven into the bay at St. Marc, Hayti, 
by the storm. 

Captain Engebrethsen has been 15 years 
in the fruit trade between Jamaica and the 
United States as mate and master of the 
Yumuri. The Yumuri was built at Middle- 
boro, England, 18 years ago and was owned 
at Bergen, Norway. She was a small steam- 
er of 473 tons and carried fruit for the 
United Fruit Company. 



FISHERMAN STUCK TO WHEEL. 



Comrade Griffin, vice-president of the In- 
ternational, and secretary of the Atlantic 
Coast Marine Cooks' and Stewards' Union, 
is back at the old stand, 42 South street, 
New York, from a visit to Mobile and New 
Orleans. 



Arthur Boudrot, a giant French-Canadian 
fisherman, clung with almost superhuman 
strength to the steering wheel while en- 
gulfed by the sea, and kept the storm-tossed 
fishing schooner Flora S. Nickerson up to 
the wind during the terrific hurricane of Sep- 
tember 17. But for his good work the entire 
crew of 24 men would have been lost. 

The little fishing schooner arrived at her 
dock at T wharf, Boston, recently, in a bat- 
tered condition after her encounter with the 
storm. 

The Nickerson was at the South Channel 
fishing grounds, about 65 miles southeast of 
Cape Cod, when she encountered the heavy 
storm which swept along the Atlantic Coast 
from the Tropics. Throughout the first part 
of the week a strong wind was blowing and 
the sea was very choppy. But on the 17th 
it broke in all its fury. 

The vessel was hove to and put under 
double reefed foresail, but at midday the 
storm had developed into a terrific hurri- 
cane. The schooner was lashed about by 
the angry seas which broke over her, carry- 
ing away two of the dories and all the mov- 
able material on her deck. 

Captain Gethro Nickerson and the crew 
took to the rigging, and were up to their 
necks in water most of the time. Two other 
members of the crew were locked in the 
cabin, and were nearly drowned by the in- 
flow of water which flooded the place. 

All the while Boudrot was at the wheel. 
He was up to his shoulders in water, and 
as each giant wave broke over the craft he 
was completely engulfed. But for more 
than a half hour, while the storm was raging 
in all its fury, with tons of water breaking 
over him, Boudrot stuck to the wheel, refus- 
ing to be shaken off. At the end of that time 
the storm had somewhat subsided, and he 
was relieved from his perilous position al- 
most exhausted. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



Because of continued dullness in the coal 
trade, the owners of the fine new collier Mel- 
rose believe that she will be held at Boston 
in idleness for at least a month, or possibly 
longer. The steamer is now tied up at Com- 
monwealth piers, East Boston, having ar- 
rived there on August 30 from Newport 
News. 



After receiving the most extensive over- 
hauling she has ever undergone, the four- 
masted schooner O. H. Brown, of Perth 
Amboy, has just left Green's shipyard in 
Chelsea, and is now anchored in the stream 
awaiting a charter before leaving here. The 
Brown was damaged by the big East Boston 
fire of July 8. 



Secretary Sullivan, of the Atlantic Coast 
Marine Firemen's Union, will shortly visit 
Boston, and inform the members of his 
Union of the conditions existing in the Gulf. 
Secretary Sullivan has been down in the 
Gulf for three weeks, and should be able to 
give a very good account of the proceedings 
in Mobile and New Orleans. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



The number of fatal accidents to 
British seamen reported during July 
was 89, as compared with 88 in June, 
and 90 in July, 1907. 

The police at Essen, Germany, on 
September 10, charged a gathering of 
rioting coal miners in the suburb of 
Wanne. Ten of the rioters wen 
wounded. 

The number of Britisli paupers re- 
lieved on one day in July in thirty- 
live selected urban districts corre- 
spond to a rate of 214 per 10,000 of 
the estimated population. 

["he number of unemployed in Lon- 
don, Eng., was strikingly illustrated 
recently when 3000 men surrounded 
a hospital which had advertised for a 
porter at a wage of $4.50 a week and 
meals. 

The Federal High Court of Aus 
tralia, in a suit brought by the cm 
ploying brewers, has decided that the 
union label is not a trade mark-, and 
lias ordered that the registration of 
the Brewery Employes' label he can- 
celed. 

Exclusive of seamen, the number 
of British workpeople reported as 
killed in the course of their employ- 
ment during July was 201, an increase 
of 4 as compared with the previous 
month, but a decrease of 26 as com 
pared with July, 1907. 

A lockout of 200,000 cotton opera- 
tives, in Manchester, Eng., seems in- 
evitable. The wage dispute is of long 
standing. The employers proposed to 
reduce wages 5 per cent, but they 
finally consented to postpone the re- 
duction until January 1 of next year. 

The Rockhampton (Australia) 
branch of the Federated Waterside 
Workers' Union has decided to pre- 
sent all outgoing officials, serving 12 
months, with a copy of a life group 
photo, and to presidents serving a 
like term a gold medal, suitably in- 
scribed. 

The street-carmen of Sydney, N. S. 
\\\. went on strike on July 24 against 
the spotter system and for the re- 
instatement of a discharged empl 
At the end of a few days a stampede 
took place among the men, with the 
result that the strike was completely 
broken. 

An imposing Anglo-German work- 
ingmen's peace demonstration was 
held at Berlin, Germany, on Septem- 
ber 20. Some 20,000 German work- 
men gathered to welcome a delega- 
tion representing the British work 
men in the interest of international 
arbitration. 

At a recent meeting of the Click- 
ers' Association of New South Wales 
it was decided to amalgamate with 
the Boot Operatives and Rough Cut 
tcrs' Union to form a New South 
Wales Boot Trades Employes' Fed- 
eration in order to obtain the bene tits 
of the Federal Arbitration Act on ac- 
count of interstate competition in the 
trade. 

The net result of all the changes 
in British wages taking effect in July 
was a decrease of £17,144 per week 
as compared with a decrease of £16,- 
671 per week in June, and an increase 
of £11,721 per week in July, 1907. 
The number of work-people affected 
was 191,232, of whom 10,054 received 
advances amounting to £259 per 
week, and 181,178 sustained decreases 
amounting to £17,403 per week. The 
total number affected in the preced- 
ing month was 156.783, and in July. 
1907, 179,860. 



Cannon's Clothing" Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LI PPM AN 


BROS. 


532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernest 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Union Goods for Union 


Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices, We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries ami our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 

Now Located at San Pedro, 

427 FRONT STREET. 

1 carry a full line of San Fran is for the seafaring people, 

having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want- The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at B0 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are huying a FUR HAT, either 
or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 



LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO. STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

A^rnis Harbor steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

■if Union Saloon, san pedro, CAL. 



When making purchases from our ad- 
vertisers, always mention the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Terkel Olsen, a native of Treungen, 
Norway, aged 56, is inquired for by 
his brother. Address Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Halvor Eugen Krogstad, a native 
Christiania, Norway, is inquired fur 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea 
men's Journal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, No. 1568, 
rs' Union of the Pacific, is in- 
quired for by his parents. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Bourgevis is inquired for by 
Ed. M. Bourgevis, who has news 
which will require his atention. Ad- 
dress, 3104 West 99th street, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Port- 
land, Or. 

Nils Nilson, a native of Stavanger, 
Norway, last heard of at Buffalo, N. 
Y., four years ago, is inquired for 
by his parents. Address, Nils Nilson, 
Nedre Bloosenborg, No. 9, Stavan- 
ger, Norway. 

Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native 
of Kalmar, Sweden, born September 
IS, 1881, supposed to be sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by 
his sisters and parents. Address, 
Klaes Swensson, Sodra Langgatan 
No. 26, Kalmar, Sweden. 

The following seamen, members of 
the crew of the schooner Minnie E. 
Caine, at the time of her wreck in 
1902, are requested to report to the 
Secretary of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific: Wm. McLaughlin, Julius 
Franz, K. Grunert, J. Koglund. W. 
Wickstrom, C. Christensen. 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



IS 





San Pedro Letter List. 



<:. 



Absolonsen, Ole M. Johnson, 
Agostino, Falletti -1399 

■ if Jurgensen, II. 
Andersen, Emil Karadza, Gus. 

Andersen, Fred. J. Kelsen, Carls 

Andersen, Tom - r, :> s Kess.-, T lor. 

Anderson, Chas. Kirst. Hans 

Anderson, Edwart Klaesson, Kar 
Anderson, Axel P. package. 
Anderson, Oscar Klausen, Karl 
Anderson, J. 

uii, Anders 
H 



W 



Arnesen, Karl A. 
Axelsson, C. B. 
Backus, C. 

Alexander 
Bally, Joe 
Barnhlll, .1. K. 

a. Herman 
Bauchwitz, Frits 

r, Gosta 
Behrens, G. 
Benrsln, J. 
Benard, Sandallo 
! en, John 

Berntsen, Ole 
Bernhardren, C. 
Bitter, Herman 

Wilhelm 

ui, J. E. 



Klein, J. -378 
Krlstensen, w. 

Kuhl, Herman 
I, ailie. A. 
Lane, Jasper 
Lange, Friderik 

a. Magie 
Larsen, F. -1113 
l.arscn. ('. I.. -1303 
I ■wis. T. M. 
l.iclici man. -1 ITiT 

Llebermann, <;■ 

-1157 
Lindall, George 
Lindgren, a. -870 
Lindholm, A. 
Linman, A. W. 
Logothetis, Pana- 

gotis 
Lonnecke, Aim. -1321 
Luman, Aiku 
Lund, W. -1341 



i a, .hack, i !hai les El. Lundstedt, I !h. 

!, R. Ck, Hans 

Joe Madson, .1 

Brusbard, Ewalt Maki. lvar 

Bush, P. .Manley. Charlie 

Cappello, if. Martin, John B. 

Caratza, ConstantlnMattson, if. J. 

a. McFarland, Uugald 

Carlson, August McKenzle, James 
Carson, August Mlkkelson, C. 

Edward Murray, Joseph 

Christensen, Christ Nestor, W. C. 
Christensen, W. H79Nielsen, M. P. 
Chrstensen, J. -1164Nielsen, W. -1000 
Christensen, Harry Nielsen, Gustave 
Christensen, Gus, Nilsson, Jolian 



1054 

Christiansen, -901 
Colombay, Louis 
Oalesten, -1156 
Ebapanen, W. 
Uhnke. W. 
Ekeland, Sigurd 



Nilsen. IT. 
Nilsen, Carl P. -143 
Nilson. U. -877 
Nisson, Louis 
Nodeland, George E. 
Nordblom, Ben 
Nordin. M 



Engebretsen, Mar-Norkamp, Richard 

l;us Norman. L. 

Erickson, August Olsen, C 



-571 

Ericksson, C. E. 
Eskbom, Arvid 
Falk, P. J. 
Fettis, P. L. 

lad. John 
nd, C. J. 
Geisler, Hans 



Olsen. W. -763 
Orten, Sigurd 
Ostlin, Frank 
Erwin 
Pautanido, s.. rg. let 
Petersen. W. 
Peterson, Nicolous 
Pettersen. Alfred 



Gouma's, C, r'g. let.Rau. R. K 
Grantley, W. G. Reek, John 

(Package) Robeson. Michael 

Greveit, Joe Robinson, Alen 

Gustafson, A. K. -600Robsham, Jens W. 
Outhree. Ravmond Rodriquez, Manuel 
Hammond. J. A. Rosan, Oscar 

llansberg, J. B. Sardls, Vassilas 

en, Alfred -1732 Savonius. B. 
Hansen. Haakon BcarabOBlo, Mario 
Hansen. LauritS A. Schlosher. Ludwig 
Hanson. Frank Schwartz, F. -1259 

Hanson. Jacob Sebeline, C 



Haydn, A. E. 

Hedman, John N. 
Hickman. Fred 
I Hike, Carl 
Holmen. George 
Holmgren. Joel 
lngbretsen. -B68 
Ipsen, Edward S. 



ilustav F. 
Sillin. George 
Skand, C. Johansen 
Smith, J. S. 
Sorin, Kristian 
Steen, Emil 
Steen, I. -199S 
Ed 



Jacobson. John -1341Svedstrup, E. 
Jamiesen, J. Svensson. Nikolans 

Janson, Chas. Swanson, G. 

Janson. F. -1«11 Sylvian, Le Bloa 

n R. -1734 Thompson. Frederick 
Jensen! J. H. -1311 Thoren. Gust 
Johannsen. Chris- Tuominen. Alfred 

tian Uggla. Alfred 

Johansen, C, -lr.m Ulke. E. 
Johansen, Hans WahlStedt, Rafael 

Johansson, Johan 880Wlekstrand. J. 
John, Robert Wiksten. Arvid 

Johndahl, Harry Wills. George 
Johnson, A. -1451 Woker, H. 
Jonasson, C. A. Toung. Charles 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Simpson, better known as 
Jack Simpson, age 32, who has sailed 
out of New York on the Portland 
Line, is inquired for by his relatives, 
Mr. J. Childs. 208 McDougall street, 
Biooklyn, N. Y., or communicate with 
the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's 
Union, IS Union street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The steamer Riverside, J. Ramselius master, 
was enrolled at the San Francisco Custom-house 
on September 24 and the steamer William H. 
Macy was registered with S. G. B. Groth master. 
One gang of longshoremen placed 11,750 sacks 
of wheat on the British ship Crown of India, at 
Portland, Or., on September 19, which is held to 
be the biggest day's work performed at that 
port in the last seven years. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 23: Steamer Grays Harbor, Karl 
Kjellin, vice B. Anfindsen; steamer Alaskan, F. 
J. Bennett, vice J. F. Nichols. 

Inquiries by salvage companies regarding the 
possibility of salving the steamer Aeon, wrecked 
on Christmas Island, have disclosed the fact that 
the engines have broken away, and the hull is 
breaking. No hope of salvage is entertained. 

The American ship William P. Frye, at San 
Francisco on September 23, 142 days from New- 
port News, Va., reports that a seaman named 
Harry Lanker was drowned during a gale on July 
14. Deceased was a native of Hamburg, Ger- 
many, aged 25 years. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 21: Steamer Santa Maria, William C. 
Rodgers vice Charles Albert; steamer Nebraskan 
refitted for San Diego, G. B. Knight vice C. J. 
Lancaster. 

In an oil explosion in the after part of the 
steam-schooner San Gabriel, lying alongside the 
wharf at San Pedro, Cal., on September 19, Chief 
Engineer Hans Olseon, First Officer Peter 
Kindall, Fritz Johnson and Chris Stigle, two mem- 
bers of the crew, were seriously burned. 

Captain William J. Bryan, a noted California 
pioneer and one of the best-known steamship 
masters on the Pacific Coast, died suddenly at his 
home in San Francisco on September 20. Captain 
Bryan was a native of Massachusetts, aged 82 
years. He first arrived at San Francisco in 1849. 
The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 25: Steamer Fox, Henrick Johanes- 
sen, vice Joseph Sanlos; steamer Fort Bragg, T. 
S. Kato, vice H. W. G. Belish; steamer City of 
Para, A. W. Nelson, vice S. Sandberg. 

A new United States Marine Hospital, to cost 
$500,000, and to replace the present inadequate 
structure on the Marine Hospital Reservation at 
the San Francisco Presidio, will probably be 
erected in the near future, if the appropriation 
bill, which Surgeon-General Wyman will recom- 
mend at the next session of Congress, be passed. 
By stipulation entered into by claimants against 
the ship British Yeoman, in the United States 
District Court at San Francisco on September 
19, it was agreed that after the ship was sold ac- 
cording to the order of the Court, the proceeds 
should remain in the registry of the Court until 
the salvage claim of the ship Drummuir should be 
settled. 

Tonnage figures prepared by the California Pro- 
motion Committee show a total tonnage in San 
Francisco Bay during 1907 of 9,678,336 tons. Com- 
pared with other cities this puts San Francisco 
in second place. The tonnage between Staten 
Island and New Jersey amounted to 17,097,799 
tons. New Orleans had 6,570,930 and Boston 
3,707,717 tons. 

The Nippon Yusha Kaisha will in future dismiss 
European captains on its liners and replace them 
with Japanese, according to Japanese newspapers 
received at Victoria, B. C. The reasons given 
are that economy is needed and that Japanese 
masters are paid lower wages, and there is a 
growing disinclination of the crews to serve 
under foreigners. 

The latest move in the Puget Sound rate war 
was announced by the International Steamship 
Company on September 19, when it made public 
the fact that, beginning on the 22d, the rate to 
Victoria, per steamer Chippewa, will be 25 cents. 
Heretofore it has been $1 one way or round trip. 
This move is to meet the Canadian Pacific's day- 
light service inaugurated on the 22d. 

Two vessels that were on the overdue list were 
taken off on September 24, having arrived at 
their respective destinations. The bark Marjory 
Glen, 138 days from Liverpool to Wellington, and 
on which was a rate of 15 per cent, arrived on 
the 24th. The bark Marechal de Villiers, 134 
days out from New Caledonia for Hamburg, also 
arrived on the 24th at the latter port. 

Believing there is no chance of a settlement 
of the rate war troubles with the Canadian Pa- 
cific, the International Steamship Company has 
announced a cut in the Vancouver rate from $2 
the round trip to $1.75. The rate of 50 cents 
the round trip between Seattle and Victoria on 
the American boats is now effective, being the 
same rate as offered by the Canadian line. 

Alexander & Baldwin have entered into a con- 
tract with the Matson Navigation Company to 
carry all its freight between Coast and Tsland 
ports for the coming year. This includes_ all 
sugar from the Alexander & Baldwin plantations 
which is shipped to the Coast and all merchandise 



from the Coast distributed through the Alexander 
& Baldwin agency. 

Cable advices received at San Francisco on 
September 22, state the steamer Manuka of the 
Canadian-Australian line, has arrived at Fanning 
Island and taken on board Captain Downie, the 
second officer and two engineers of the wrecked 
steamer Aeon. The Manuka then proceeded to 
Christmas Island to rescue the passengers and 
crew of the Aeon. The marooned people will be 
taken to Sydney, to which port the liner which 
will pick them up is bound. 

In obedience to an order of the District Court, 
United States Marshal Elliott, of San Francisco, 
sold the ship British Yeoman at auction on Sep- 
tember 21. Bidding was started at $1000 and 
crept up to $9200, at which price she was knocked 
down to Eschen & Miner Company. As the 
libels against the vessel aggregate something 
over $12,000, and her value is considerably over 
three times that amount, it is thought strange by 
shipping men that larger offers were not made. 
Advices were received from London on Sep- 
tember 24 to the effect that the French bark 
Vendee, bound from Portland, Or., for Liver- 
pool, with a cargo of wheat, met with disaster 
off Wollaston Island, close to Cape II urn. The 
particulars from the wreck are meager, being 
to the effect that the wheat-laden craft sprang 
a leak, and that despite heroic efforts on the 
part of the crew the water gained, and the vessel 
was beached. At last accounts all hope of saving 
cither the ship or the cargo had been abandoned, 
and the crew had taken to the shore. 

There was a panic on board the ship Bohemia 
on her passage from the salmon fisheries of 
Alaska, owing to an epidemic of fear among the 
Chinese cannery hands during a spell of stormy 
weather. Shortly after leaving Koggiung the 
ship was overtaken by a heavy storm. The can- 
nery hands were overcome bv fear, and created 
such a disturbance that the captain ordered them 
into confinement until the storm had passed. 
During the storm the vessel lost her foretopmast. 
During the fishing season one of the ship's crew, 
Andrew Scier, was drowned. 

Under a recent Act of Congress a board of 
local inspectors for the Steamboat Inspection 
service has been appointed for the Hawaiian sta- 
tion. Information was received by Supervising 
Inspector Bermingham from Washington on 
September 22 that the appointments of Captain 
W. Howe as Inspector of Hulls and Carl Lehner 
as Inspector of Boilers for the Island station have 
been confirmed. They will leave for their new 
station on the first steamer, and with them will 
go James A. Sullivan, assistant clerk at the office 
of the Supervising Inspector, who will now rank- 
as chief clerk of the Honolulu office. 

The new life-saving Government tug Sno- 
homish, which made a successful trial trip off 
the Delaware Capes recently, is being given its 
finishing touches at the yards of Pusey & Jones. 
Wilmington, Del., preparatory to going to Balti- 
more to be fitted out. The tug will be stationed 
in Neah Bay, near Vancouver Island. British 
Columbia. The Snohomish is the only vessel of 
her kind in American waters, and is believed to 
be the only one in the world. In her trial off 
the Capes she averaged 13.65 knots for four con- 
secutive hours. Her main engine developed 1800 
horsepower. 

The Japanese seal poachers who were recently 
caught in northern waters by the United States 
officials, will be tried at Valdez on October 1. 
Among those arrested were Captain H. Ritchie, 
an American navigator, and two other Americans, 
who are accused of assisting the Japanese in their 
unlawful work. The seized schooners are now at 
Unalaska. Although the cutter Rush has re- 
turned, the Bear, Perry, and McCulloch are still 
cruising around the Pribiloff Islands, and the gun- 
boat Yorktown is also in the immediate vicinity. 
The poachers are reported as having been unus- 
ually active and daring during this season. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on September 25: Ship Toxteth, 
208 days from Port Talbot. 90 per cent; bark 
Alice, 126 days from New Caledonia for Rotter- 
dam, 15 per cent; bark La Banche, 135 days from 
New Caledonia for Glasgow, 15 per cent; ship 
Antigua, 147 days from New Caledonia for Rot- 
terdam, 15 per cent; ship Hyderabad, 134 days 
from Tahiti for Rotterdam, 8 per cent; bark 
Gladova, 155 days from Liverpool for Antofa- 
gasta, 40 per cent; ship Verbena, 172 days from 
Portland for Queenstown, 8 per cent; bark 
Hougomont, 79 days from Coquimbo for Toco- 
pilla, 65 per cent. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE. Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commereial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 125 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



For good beds and clean rooms, go to "THE 
HARRISON," 456 Harrison street, corner of 
First, San Francisco. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 222 State St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, III., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
.ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 

^= J O U R N A L — - 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN A I 'VANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAE, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 



SAILORS SUPPORT MAGUIRE. 



Whereas, The Hon. James G. Maguire is a can- 
didate for election to the Congress of the United 
States from the Fourth Congressional district of 
California; and 

Whereas, The record of Mr. Maguire during 
three previous terms in Congress, and in all his 
acts, public and private, prior to and since his 
service as a member of the House of Represen 
tatives, is one of unflinching devotion to and 
active interest in the public welfare, combined 
with great ability as a champion of the people's 
rights; and 

Whereas, The services of Mr. Maguire to the 
seamen, especially in securing the passage by 
Congress of the Maguire Act, entitle him to the 
gratitude and support of all members of the sea- 
faring craft; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
in regular meeting assembled at Headquarters, 
San Francisco, Cal., September 28, 1908, that we 
indorse the candidacy of the Hon. James G. Ma- 
guire for Congress and pledge ourselves to do 
everything within our power to insure his elec- 
tion; further 

Resolved, That we commend the candidacy of 
Mr. Maguire to all citizens, and especially to all 
who are interested in maritime affairs and in 
securing legislation for the improvement of con- 
ditions affecting the maritime interests, local and 
national, and urge that they unite in supporting 
Mr. Maguire for the office of Representative from 
the Fourth Congressional district of California. 

The foregoing resolutions were adopted 
by the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, at its 
regular weekly meeting at Headquarters on 
the 28th inst. This action carries with it a 
significance favorable to Judge Maguire, the 
extent of which may not be apparent at first 
glance. The Sailors' Union is not "in poli- 
tics," and never has been. In fact, that or- 
ganization has always shunned all forms of 
political action, believing that, apart from the 
reasons governing organized labor generally 
in that regard, the circumstances of the sea- 
men make it incumbent upon them to avoid 
any alliance with any party or candidate. Tn 
pledging its support to Judge Maguire, the 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific makes a de- 
parture from its established policy, a departure 
based upon a single precedent, namely, that of 
its indorsement of Judge Maguire upon the 
occasion of that gentleman's first run for Con- 
gress, in 1892. 

Sixteen years ago the seamen had just en- 
tered upon a struggle to free themselves from 
the ancient and oppressive slave laws which 
kept them in a state of helpless degradation. 
The nomination of Judge Maguire for Con- 
gress was the first ray of hope in what then 



seemed to be a desperate situation. Judge 
Maguire promised that, if elected, he would 
introduce the Seamen's bill and fight for its 
passage. In consideration of this promise the 
Sailors' Union formally indorsed the candidacy 
of Judge Maguire, and its members and their 
friends worked enthusiastically for his suc- 
cess. The rest is well-known history. 
Judge Maguire was elected ; he intro- 
duced the Seamen's bill and secured its pas- 
sage, despite the most strenuous opposition 
from the most powerful quarters. The 
measure thus enacted has since been known 
as the Maguire Act, and its author has since 
been known as the best friend of the seamen 
since the days of Samuel Plimsoll. 

Judge Maguire was thrice elected to Con- 
gress, each time with an increased majority. 
His record in the House of Representatives 
is a record of consistent devotion to the pub- 
lic interests and of valuable service to his con- 
stituents and the country at large. The 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific is not "in poli- 
tics," but it is in the fight to insure the elec- 
tion of a man who has made and won a good 
fight for that organization. The Sailors' 
Union is willing to stake some chances on the 
charge of inconsistency with reference to its 
policy of "no politics," rather than take any 
chance of being charged with forgetfulness or 
ingratitude toward one who has served it 
and the whole people well. 



A "COUNTRY WITH STRIKES." 



What better could illustrate the need of com- 
pulsory arbitration in labor disputes than the 
closing of 400 cotton mills in Lancashire, Eng- 
land, because of a question of wages? It is stated 
that 140.000 operatives are idle, and losing $700,- 
000 in wages weekly. 

In this regard England might well follow the 
example of New Zealand and other of her colo- 
nies which adopted compulsory arbitration long 
ago, thereby attaining a stability of production 
and prosperity unknown before. — The Ree, Sacra- 
mento, Cal. 

It is unfortunate that The Bee has not kept 
track of events in New Zealand. That erst- 
while Utopia of the compulsory arbitration- 
ists has recently suffered serious damage to its 
reputation as the "country without strikes." 
New Zealand is now a country with strikes, 
and lots of them. About the only difference 
between New Zealand and any other place, 
say California, is that the striker in the 
fromer place stands to be fined, and even to 
go to jail, for his temerity. The last word to 
be said against compulsory arbitration has 
been said by the workers of New Zealand, 
who have formally avowed their preference 
for the strike as a necessary weapon of last 
resort — despite their willingness to admit 
that compulsory arbitration has worked well 
in some instances. 

A close perusal of the labor press of New 
Zealand and other parts of Australasia, gives 
good ground for the prediction that that 
country will shortly witness a state of indus- 
trial warfare compared to which the troubles 
of the past will appear insignificant. We do 
not look upon this prospect with pleasure, but 
with profound regret. Our regret is the 
greater because the situation now portending 
in the Antipodes is the result of a fatal blind- 
ness to human nature, as manifested by the 
unconquerable desire for personal liberty. In 
their craze for experimentation, the econo- 
mists, sociologists and statesmen (?) of New- 
Zealand and Australia have sought to take 
from men their right to quit work at pleasure, 
being encouraged in their folly by the appar- 
ent willingness of men to forego that right. 
Now the men of Australasia are about to 



reassert the right which they had formerly 
renounced. The situation as it stands forcibly 
recalls the old maxim that no man may volun- 
tarily enslave himself, since God has or- 
dained that all men shall be free. 



The Lake Seamen's Union and its sister 
unions are to be congratulated upon the skill 
with which they have conducted the contest 
during the present Lake season against the 
attempt of the Lake Carriers' Association to 
destroy unionism on the Great Lakes. The 
statements appearing from time to time in the 
Lake Department of the Journal, from the 
pens of Comrades Joshua Blount and Win. II. 
Jenkins, clearly expose the animus of the 
Lake Carriers. For once the latter must ad- 
mit that they have met their match in the 
game of strategy and tactics. The Lake Sea- 
men's Union has practiced to good purpose 
the established rule in warfare of all kinds, 
that to be successful one must know when to 
avoid a battle, as well as when to engage in 
one. Non-resistance is sometimes more ef- 
fective than resistance. At any rate, the Lake 
Carriers' Association has been effectually 
checkmated in its scheme of drawing the or- 
ganized seamen of the Great Lakes into a fight 
against a "ghost." The boot is on the other 
leg. 



The communication addressed by the At- 
lantic Coast Seamen's Union to the Commis- 
sion on Safety of Life at Sea brings out the 
salient features of the manning question as 
related to the general subject of the Commis- 
sion's inquiries. The Commission has been 
supplied with a great deal of data upon the 
manning question, and it is to be hoped that 
that body will consider and report upon that 
phase of the subject. Without intending to 
anticipate the report of the Commission, it 
may be said that failure to take proper cog- 
nizance of this, the most important feature of 
the subject of safety of life at sea will raise 
a serious question as to the usefulness, if not 
as to the purpose of that body. 



Mr. Taft, in a letter recently made public, 

says: 

I favor, so far as the settling of industrial dis- 
putes is concerned, the maintenance of an official 
commission for the official investigation, at the 
instance of the Executive, into the merits of the 
controversy and their publication. Of course, 
this could be accomplished by a voluntary sub- 
mission to the decision of the arbitration, but the 
investigation I would have made at any rate and 
the report published. The force of public opin- 
ion is generally strong enough to bring about a 
peaceful result. 

In other words, the force of public opinion 
is generally strong enough to break a strike ! 
The public is generally opposed to strikes, 
on the principle that it is opposed to any dis- 
turbance of its peace. Consequently, the pub- 
lic generally prefers "peace at any price" to 
justice at the price of a strike. 



A "voice from the grave" has been silenced. 
The posthumous letter of ex-President Cleve- 
land, favoring the election of Taft for Presi- 
dent, has been acknowledged to be a forgery. 
The forger is none other than Von Branden- 
burg, well, but not favorably, known to or- 
ganized labor as chief scullion of the Parry- 
Post-Van Cleave outfit. It is suggestive of 
the desperate straits in which Mr. Taft and 
his supporters find themselves, that they are 
willing to put a lie into the mouth of a dead 
man ! 



Remember the Cigarmakers when buying 
long smokes. Demand the blue label! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ATLANTIC SEAMEN ON MANNING. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



efficiency of the crew alone were responsible for 
the loss of life. 

The same story is again told in the General 
Slocum disaster. In the report of this catas- 
trophe, where over a thousand lives were sac- 
rificed, issued by the United States Commission 
of Investigation, we find the following: 

"The services rendered by the mate and deck- 
hands in fighting the fire were not what they 
should have been, and in controlling and aiding 
the passengers the mate and crew gave little as- 
sistance. This was CHIEFLY DUE TO THE 
PERSONNEL OF THE CREW, which, from 
the evidence adduced and from the example of 
the crew that appeared before the commission, 
WAS OBVIOUSLY OF A LOW GRADE AS 
TO EFFICIENCY. * *' * The inefficiency and 
poor quality of the deck crew of this vessel, 
doubtless typical of the majority of the crews of 
excursion steamers, IS ONE OF THE ESSEN- 
TIAL FACTS THAT CAUSED THE LOSS 
OF SO MANY LIVES." 

A still more sweeping condemnation of an in- 
efficient crew was made by the United States 
local inspectors in their report on the loss of the 
steamer Larchmont and the schooner Harry 
Knowlton, in Long Island Sound, in February, 
1907, when upward of a hundred and fifty lives 
were destroyed. They deal with the subject as 
follows: 

"With the temperature at or below zero, the 
wind from the northwest blowing at an estimated 
rate of from thirty to forty miles an hour; the 
steamer enveloped in escaping steam from dis- 
lodged steam pipes and damaged boilers, and the 
electric lights out shortly after the collision took 
place, direful consequences followed when orders 
given by the master to his HETEROGENEOUS 
AND DEMORALIZED CREW were incom- 
pletely carried out. Notwithstanding the fact 
that boat drills were held each week regularly, 
under the supervision of the master, the net re- 
sults of the efforts made in handling lifeboats 
and liferafts were far from satisfactory; a result 
chargeable, we believe, to a system which pre- 
vails — and is allowed — of employing men 
WHOLLY INCOMPETENT TN AN EMER- 
GENCY OF THIS, OR ANY SIMILAR KIND. 
TO MAN, LOWER AND MANAGE LIFE- 
SAVING APPLIANCES REQUIRED TO BE 
CARRIED ON SOUND STEAMERS." 

It would be unnecessary to cite to the Com- 
mission further cases where human lives have 
been lost, a loss increased by the inefficiency of 
crews. We submit to the Commission that any 
manning scale not based upon a definite standard 
of individual efficiency can not assure a crew "suf- 
ficient at all times to manage the vessel." 

We submit to the Commission that for the bet- 
ter protection and the better safeguarding of life 
at sea a definite and fixed standard of skill and 
efficiency of the crews of American vessels should 
be fixed by statute. 

We submit that one of the most important tests 
of efficiency and one that should be enacted into 
law is knowledge of the English language; that 
no person without sufficient knowledge of the 
language should be permitted employment in any 
capacity on any American vessel. We submit 
that the question of the efficiency of the crew is 
the most important question relating to safety of 
life at sea. Without an efficient crew the best 
devices and appliances are by inefficient men 
made a further source of danger. This is a fact 
that seems to have been lost track of by our leg- 
islators, as we find nothing on our statute books, 
not even a line, requiring the slightest test of 
skill or efficiency. And this in spite of the nu- 
merous disasters that are continually occurring, 
and in many of which, as shown above, the local 
officials have attributed the loss of life directly to 
inefficient crews. 

We further submit that an undermanned vessel, 
whether a cargo or a passenger vessel, is a seri- 
ous menace to the safe navigation of not only 
herself, but is a danger to all vessels sailing in 
the same vicinity. The proper manning of freight 
vessels should also be given attention; they 
should not be allowed to operate with the ridicu- 
lously small crews they now employ. This is 
especially true of the Great Lakes. 

The safety of the lives of the crew is affected 
by many things besides shipwreck, fire, or col- 
lision. An undermanned vessel often involves 
sacrifices of human life in other ways. Sailors 
fall to their death through hatches, because of 
one or two men being compelled to do the work 
of three or four; others are caught in the gear 
and injured or killed because of an inefficient and 
insufficient crew, etc. 

On many steamers, both cargo and passenger, 
it is a common occurrence to see a marine fire- 
man, unconscious from physical exhaustion, 
hoisted out of the stokehole and a member of 
the deck crew ordered down to take the place 
of the exhausted fireman. Such events, you will 
note, serve to further reduce the present inad- 
equate deck crew. 

Tn conclusion, we submit, that while we ap- 
preciate that the Commission is appointed pri- 
marily to recommend, and if possible to suggest 
changes in the laws that will tend toward the 
greater protection of life at sea, and not to go 



into the laws applicable to seafaring men, never- 
theless, recognizing the fact that the efficiency of 
the crew is the greatest factor tending to pro- 
tection of life, and realizing that a proper degree 
of skill and efficiency among seafaring men will 
never be reached until the conditions of the 
laborers of the sea are placed on a plane with the 
laborers of the land, and realizing, further, that 
any legislation that will tend to better the condi- 
tions of the seamen of all classes will tend di- 
rectly to increase the efficiency of the crew, we 
therefore ask the Commission to consider the 
present statute laws of the United States appli- 
cable to seamen, and we submit to the Commis- 
sion, as an appendix hereto, certain proposed 
amendments to the laws in question which we be- 
lieve the seamen are entitled to and which we 
earnestly believe will, if enacted into law, tend 
directly to increase the efficiency of the seamen 
of the American merchant marine. The majority 
of these proposed amendments have already been 
introduced in the House of Representatives by 
Congressman Spight, of Mississippi, and are now 
before the Committee on Merchant Marine and 
Fisheries as Bill H. R. 14655. 

In further submitting suggestions relative to 
the subject matter that your Commission has 
under consideration, we wish to bring to your at- 
tention the matter of load-line. 

We submit to the Commission that a much- 
needed safeguard to human life at sea is the en- 
actment into law of a provision requiring a load- 
line on every vessel, an Act similar in its nature 
to the British Plimsoll Act which has been in 
force now for some years on British ships and 
has been found to work satisfactorily to all par- 
ties concerned. 

It is hard to see what opposition there could be 
to such an Act. Tf American vessels load so 
lightly that the Act would be unnecessary, then 
no hardship would accrue to them by its passage, 
and if, on the other hand, -they load too deeply 
then the Act is certainly a much-needed one and 
can not from a humanitarian standpoint be op- 
posed. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WM. H. FRAZTER. 
Secretary Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union. 



Among the arrivals on the schooner Tda Mc- 
Kay, at San Francisco on September 22, was 
Louis Reed, a survivor of the wreck of the ship 
John F. Miller, which was lost in the Northern 
waters three months ago. Reed gives a graphic 
account of the wreck and also of the experiences 
of the men from the Miller on Unimak Island be- 
fore they were rescued. Ten of the men on the 
wreck were drowned and Reed and nine other 
survivors only succeeded in reaching the inland 
after great hardship. They finally arrived at a 
station on the island owned by Fred Hansen. 
Here, instead of being succored, Reed says. Han- 
sen refused them aid. They managed to live on 
raw fish and the meat of such animals as they 
succeeded in killing until thev reached a lisrht- 
house station. On the way they were succored 
by a Portuguese trader who furnished them with 
clothing and provisions. The Tda McKay was 
met by them at Bear Harbor. 



The following decisions and sentences were 
handed down hv the local Board of Steamboat 
Inspectors at San Francisco on September 22 
as a result of recent investigations. Tn the col- 
lision between the steamer Juliette and the fraso- 
liner Pirate, Cantain Jarvis of the former had his 
license suspended for fifteen davs, and Caotain 
Gillard of the rrasoliner will be without a license 
for sixty davs because he allowed a schoolbov to 
stand a trick at the wheel while he attended to the 
engines. The stranding of the steamer Aberdeen 
on the south ietty at Humboldt Bav resulted in 
Captain T. Hansen, her master, having his license 
suspended for thirty days. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters. Chicago, Sept. 21, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary pro tern. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 



Headquarters, Buffalo. N. Y., Sept. 21, 1908. 
Shipping very poor. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 
55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 22, 1908. 
Shipping good during week. 

WM. H. FRAZTER. Secretary. 
l'/A Lewis St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1908. 
Shipping slow; prospects better. 

H. P. GRIFFIN, Secretary. 
42 South St. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 28, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., P. Scharrenberg presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping slacking up again. Resolutions 
were adopted indorsing the candidacy of James 
G Maguire for Representative from the Fourth 
Congressional District of California (the resolu- 
tions are printed elsewhere in this issue). The 
following were declared elected delegates to the 
convention of the California State Federation of 
Labor: John W. Ericksen, P. Scharrenberg and 
A. Seaman. Nominations were made for delegates 
to the New Orleans convention of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America. 

E. ELLISON, Secretary pro tern. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Agency, Sept. 19, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

A. E. SIMMONDS, Agent. 
Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 21, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation quiet. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 21, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townscnd Agency, Sept. 21, 1908. 
Shipping poor; prospects uncertain. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 21, 1908. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland. Or., Agency, Sept. 21, 1908. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 20, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Aeent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 21, 1908. 
Shipping slack; prospects poor. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 14, 1908. 
Shipping very poor. 

TOSEPH T. LTDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 24, 1908. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m.. .Tohn Brose in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. 

EUGENE STETDLE, Secretary. 
Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 17, 1908. 
Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 17. 1908. 
Shipping good on steam-schooners, slack on 
sailing vessels. 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2155. 



DIED. 

Peter Joseph Finegan. No. 657, a native of Ire- 
land, aged 31, died at Tacoma, Wash., on Sept. 
14. 1908. 

Joseph Johnson. No. 94, a native of Finland, 
aged 59. died at Martinez, Cal., on Sept. 28, 1908 

G. Newman, No. 294, a native of Finland, acred 
46. died at San Francisco, Cal., on Sept. 16, 1908. 

Otto Nielsen, No. 987, a native of Norwav, aged 
51. died at San Francisco, Cal., on Sept. 22, 190S 

John Nilsen, No. 922. a native of Norway, aored 
23. died on the ship "Tacoma" at sea. May, 1908. 

The following are reported drowned in the 
wreck of the schooner "Tohn F. Miller" at Uni- 
mak Island, on Jan. 9, 1908: 

Albert Lund, No. 1466, a native of Norway, 
aged 24. 

Christian Nielsen, No. 833, a native of Den 
mark, aged 31. 



COAST SETAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^<^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES, 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*&>S* 



OWNERS WANTED STRIKE. 



When the Lake Carriers' Association de- 
clared for the so called "( 'pen Shop" policy 
this spring they undoubtedly expected, and 
evidently desired, that the seamen's unions 
would immediately order a strike against the 
vessels of their Association. The employers 
wanted to bring about industrial war on the 
Great Lakes, and to accomplish their object 
they carefully avoided doing anything that 
would have made an agreement possible. 

The unions had applied for a conference 
with the vesselowners and had submitted no 
new demands upon the owners; indeed, the 
seamen's unions had not even instructed 
their wage committees, being content to 
send the committees uninstructed, so that 
there would he nothing to prevent an ami- 
cable agreement. 

It appears, however, that the employers 
feared the unions might prove to lie so con- 
servative and fair that it would he nearly 
impossible to avoid an agreement. The 
vesselowners did not want an agreement of 
any kind. 'What they did want was to force 
the unions to call their members out on 
strike. 

The uninitiated might ask why the em- 
ployers should actually desire a strike on the 
part of their own employes. The reason is 
very apparent. They proposed to make use 
of the "hard times" in an attempt to disrupt 
and destroy the unions. 

The Lake Carriers declared for the "< >pen 
Shop" in April, just about the time naviga- 
tion is usually expected to open on the 
Great Lakes, but they had no intention of 
starting their boats out until some time in 
June. If, therefore, the unions could be 
stampeded into a strike more than two 
months before the boats started, the vessel- 
owners could sit and laugh, taking it easy, 
while the unions spent those two months 
fighting a "ghost." The results would 
naturally have been rather demoralizing 
upon both the membership and the finances 
of the unions. Besides this, thousands of 
destitute unemployed workmen of all call- 
ings were walking the streets, eagerly 
searching for jobs. Here was a chance to 
starve out the seamen by getting them to 
begin a strike two months before anyone 
was aboard the boats, and then, in the slow, 
long-drawn-out start that began in June, 
only one or two boats going into commis- 
sion at a time, the ships could have been 
manned in some fashion with men from the 
ranks of the army of unemployed workers 
of other trades — not with any idea that such 
green hands would make successful sailors, 
firemen or cooks, but they could be used to 
make a showing against the unions, to dis- 
courage the union men and cause the ex- 
penditure of money from the treasuries of 
the organizations, with the hope of finally 
breaking the unions. 

It was a bright idea, a good (?) scheme; 
but it did not work out very well. The seamen 
were not to be caught napping in any such 
fashion. Their unions declined to play into 
the hands of the vesselowners by striking 
at such a time and under such circumstances. 
Instead the union men decided to gi 
board the ships and fill in the jobs. 



The vesselowners, having failed in their 
first move, did nothing further until June, 
when a considerable number of ships went 
into commission. Then they inaugurated 
a lockout against union men on a few of 
their ships, evidently hoping in this way to 
force a strike on the whole fleet. 

Again they failed, and in desperation they 
gradually extended the lockout, rigidh 
criminating against union men. The union 
men were prepared, however, and calmly 
proceeded to break through the lockout. 

In order to get through the lockout some 
of the union men had to "disguise" them- 
as non-union men, i. e., deny that they 
were members of the Union. This kind of 
a game evidently got the vesselowners 
guessing some. Their discrimination sys- 
tem got quite a jolt. 

Who can criticize the union men for not 
telling the truth when they were being dis- 
criminated against by those who were look- 
ing for the information? 

If a man can escape being robbed by say- 
ing to the highwayman that he has no 
money, may be not do so, even though his 
pockets be full of coin? It is only self-de- 
fense. 

The seamen, when they were driven too 
hard, applied the law of self-defense, and 
they surely had a moral as well as a legal 
right to do so. 

He who understands thoroughly how to 
defend himself soon gets in a position to 
safely "go to it" himself, if attacks do not 
cease. The seamen's unions on the Great 
Lakes clearly know how to defend them- 
selves, and they will undoubtedly be able to 
exhibit plenty of aggressiveness, should it 
he necessary, when the time and opportu- 
nity presents itself. 

Are the vesselowners trying to teach the 
unions that the proper way to handle indus- 
trial questions is to watch for an oppor- 
tunity and then to go the limit against an 
opponent, regardless of justice and fair deal- 
ing? 

Are they trying to teach the workers that 
"might is right" irrespective of the merits 
of the controversy? 

Is not the system of trade agreements, 
fair dealing between employers and em- 
ployes, much better, more honest, and de- 
cidedly more creditable to both the Lake 
Carriers' Association and the seamen's 
unions? 

The union men stand for trade agreements ; 
hut, agreement or no agreement, they will 
not permit their rights of association and mu- 
tual self -protection to be taken away from 
them. Joshua Blunt. 



It is probable that the big new passenger 
steamer City of Cleveland will be taken off 
the Detroit-Cleveland run about the middle 
of October, after which she will go into 
winter quarters at Detroit. The steamer 
City of St. Ignace, which has made her last 
scheduled trip of the season, will remain at 
Detroit until that time, when she will be 
placed on the run to Cleveland until the 
close of navigation. The St. Ignace will 
have Sandusky as her southern terminal 
next season, making stops at Sandusky, Put- 
in Ray, Detroit, Goderich, Out., Alpena and 
Mackinaw City. 



"BRIGHT YOUNG MEN" AT WORK. 



The claim that the "bright young man" 
can be taught to steer a ship in a few 
months is proved (?) by some of the head- 
lines of this week's marine columns. Here 
are a few samples : 

"Conestoga Released." 

"The Goodyear Aground." 

"I'. 1'. .Miller Ashore." 

"Repairs Will Cost $2,000." 

"The Hoover it Mason to Dock at Lo- 
rain." 

"To Release the King Edward.'' 

"Big Repair Job." 

"Working on Stranded Boat." 

Following are a few "marine items" from 
the press: 

Detroit, September 10. — The excursion steamer 
Pleasure was damaged to-day while lying at 
Windsor dock by the steamer D. C. Whitney. 

The Whitney was trying to land below the e\ 
cursion steamer when her engine got on a dead 
center and she ran into the Pleasure, cutting the 
latter adrift and damaging her to the exti 
several hundred dollars. The Pleasure is hcing 
repaired by the Detroit Shipbuilding Co. 



Cheboygan, Mich., September 9. — (Special) — 
The steamer Robert Wallace went on a reef 
off Cheboygan early this morning. The ac- 
cident is said to have been caused by smoky 
atmosphere. The wrecking tug Favorite has been 
dispatched from St. Ignace to go to her aid, and 
it is believed she soon will be free. 



Milwaukee, September 9. — (Special.) — A col- 
lision between the steamers Pere Marquette No. 
3 and Philetus Sawyer caused small damage to 
both vessels. The boats met in the harbor en- 
trance. The Sawyer was going out and the Mar- 
quette coming in. The Sawyer sustained a small 
(lent in her port side. 



Port Huron, September 7. — The steamer 
Amasa Stone, upbound, early this morning, col- 
lided with the steamer Edwards, bound down, at 
the Turn abreast of Sarnia. Both boats continued 
on their way. 



The steamer Hoover and Mason was released 
from Stag Island yesterday, and is on the way to 
Lake Erie in tow of the steamer James E. David- 
son, assisted by the wrecking tug Favorite. The 
ship is understood to have lost her shoe. 



The steamer Albright struck an obstruction 
near Fort Gratiot light and punched a hole in her 
bottom. The United States steamer Hancock has 
gone to investigate. It is believed that some 
blip's anchor lies in the channel. 



The steamer Hoover & Mason went aground at 
tlie entrance to Lorain harbor yesterday morn- 
ing. She was released without lightering and 
towed up to the furnace. 



It will be necessary to remove fifty-six plates 
from the damaged steamer Neepawah. now in 
drydock at Ecorse yard. 



The steamer A. E. Nettleton of the Wilkinson 
fleet, which is in drydock at Toledo, has about 
twenty damaged plates. She struck on the rocks 
just below the Canadian lock at the Soo. 



Oh. there are more of these, but I guess 
this is enough. These items are clipped 
from the Plain Dealer and Leader of Sep- 
tember 7 to 9. Say, honest, what do you 
think? Would you not like to insure some 
of these "overland ships"? 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut. O. 



The indications are that stocks of coal at 
the head of the Lakes will be short at the 
close of the season. Shipments of soft coal 
to Lake Superior up to September 1 show 
a loss of 1,333,312 tons compared with the 
same time last year. In 1907 the fleet car- 
ried 6.32S.853 tons up to September 1 and 
this year the movement was only 4,995,541 
tons. Shipments of hard coal were 64,411 
tons ahead of last season. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



JOLTS BY JOSHUA. 

Steady now ! 



Always have a good word for your union. 



Notice how quickly the vesselowners took 
advantage of a bad season. 



The old ship of unionism hasn't mule any 
water yet. She was built for heavy weather, 
anyway. 

"Recognition of the union" by the ship- 
owners is not so very important so long as 
the seamen themselves "recognize" the ad- 
visability of being union men. 



It is noticeable that the few steamers which 
have "real" non-union wheelsmen aboard are 
hitting the bottom pretty often this season. 
Those non-union wheelsmen should be sent 
to some of the amusement parks to ride the 
"Bump the Bumps" for awhile. It might 
cure them of the habit of "Bumping the 
Bumps" in the channels. 



"We want competent seamen," said the Cap- 
tains' Committee at the Wage Conference in 
1906. 

"You'll take whomsoever we d — n please to 
send you," replied the L. C. A. shipping mas- 
ters in 1908. 

Wonder how the captains like it? 



The Lake Carriers' have given some exam- 
ples of what they consider "fair treatment" of 
seamen. During this season they have intro- 
duced the "lay off" at both ends of the trip on 
many ships. They give the men three or four 
days' work, and then a week's rest — the lat- 
ter without pay, of course. 



Who said the college boys were placed 
aboard the ships to fill the places of good union 
deckhands? That's a mistake. The college 
boys couldn't fill the places of union men ; 
they were evidently sent aboard to take kodak 
pictures of the "Soo" locks, etc. At least 
that's about all most of them did do, accord- 
ing to reports, except to sign articles and draw 
the pay that others had to work for. 



The Lake Carriers' endeavor to create the 
impression that they believe in good wages 
and proper conditions for seamen. If that 
is true they simply agree with the Union. 
Why, then, are they fighting the Union ? 

The fact of the matter is that the vessel- 
owners have not forgotten the days when they 
could get deckhands for fifty cents a day and 
wheelsmen or watchmen for a dollar a day or 
less. They look longingly to the past. The 
obstacle between them and their "good old 
days" of cheap labor is the Lake Seamen's 
Union. Just imagine where the wages would 
drop to if the Union was out of the way. But 
the Union won't get out of the way. It pro- 
poses to stay on the job. 



A year or so ago many of the captains were 
complaining that the overtime clause in the 
agreement with the Lake Seamen's Union 
prevented them from having proper control 
and discipline aboard ship. "The ordinary 
seamen won't work overtime without extra 
pay," said they, "and that's contrary to dis- 
cipline." 

My, how times do change! This season the 
college boys, who were placed aboard by the 
owners, seemed to think that the most im- 



portant business aboard ship was to watch the" 
scenery. They often would not, and some 
times could not, do any work at all. Did the 
captains complain? Nay, nay! "Discipline" 
seems to be intended for union men oidy. 

It may be true, however, that only when 
union men are on board is discipline possible. 

Joshua Blunt. 



ONE ON QUIGLEY. 



They tell this one on James Quigley, who 
was assistant scab shippingmaster at Con- 
neaut, but made up his mind that he wanted 
to be a sailor bold. He shipped himself as 
a guaranteed non-union watchman on the 
steamer Scranton, -of the Mitchell fleet. She 
towed cut stern first, about dark. Now, our 
sailor bold knew port and starboard when 
be stood looking forward, and so he put up 
the sidelights starboard light on the port 
side and port light on the starboard side and 
faced them aft, as she was going stern first ! 
Can you beat it? Of course, if I wanted to 
joke or tell a fib I would say he looked for 
green oil for the starboard light, and for red 
oil for the port light, but some of you might 
doubt me if I did. 

W. H. Jknkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



DREDGING GRAND MARAIS. 



The dredging of the entry to the harbor 
of refuge at Grand Marais, Mich., completed 
last August, has been officially accepted and 
finally approved. There is an approach to 
the harbor mouth from the Lake of 300 feet 
and an entrance to the harbor itself of from 
fourteen to eighteen feet at least in depth, 
so that any vessel not drawing more than 
eighteen feet of water can take refuge from 
storms in what is now one of the best of the 
smaller harbors on the Great Lakes. The 
work was done by the Lake Erie Dredging 
Company with their big dredge Pan-Ameri- 
can under the direction of Lieutenant Col- 
onel Graham D. Eitch, corps of engineers. 



CONTRACTS TO BE LET. 



An official of the American Shipbuilding 
Company is authority for the statement that 
the Pittsburg Steamship Company, which is 
the marine department of the United States 
Steel Trust, will shortly place another order 
for new Lake steamships, and that within 
the next sixty or ninety days these interests 
will have let contracts for at least a dozen 
ships. 

These contracts will assure the company 
good earnings for the current fiscal year. It 
is also asserted that revenue from repair 
work next winter will be large, and it is 
believed that these conditions will warrant 
resumption of dividends on the common 
stock at an early date. 



The United States Lake Survey is in- 
formed by telegram from Major W. V. Jud- 
son, United States engineer at Milwaukee, 
that the barge S. C. Baldwin, loaded with 
stone, is reported to have capsized and sunk 
August 27, in Lake Michigan, two and a 
half miles southeast by south from Twin 
Rivers point light, about two miles offshore. 
The barge had no spars and is reported as 
lying in sixty feet of water so thai il is 
probably not dangerous to navigation. Fur- 
t her investigation will be made. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



E. J. Wheeler is inquired for by his sister, 
Mrs. Lillian Allen, 2619 J street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Norman Hamburg is requested to com- 
municate with Wm. Curry, Agent Lake Sea- 
men's Union, Cleveland, O. 

Comrade Walter Birrell will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Leonard Hull, R. F. D., 
No. 1, Hope, Mich. 

Second-Mate James Tobin, shipkeeper on 
the steamer Selwyn Eddy, at Milwaukee, is 
reported missing. 

Ed. Rat' enow, No. 5388, Lake Seamen's 
Union, i- nquired for by his sister. Mrs. Chris 
Marquist, 429 N. Clark street, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Bonner, No. 7823, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is requested to communicate with his 
sister, who is very ill, at Kingston, Ontario. 

John Livingstone Ritchie, No. 21289, Lake 
Seamen's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. M. A. Ritchie, 283 N. Lisgar street, To- 
ronto, Out. 

John McCormick, a marine fireman, who 
left the Lakes about a year ago, is inquired 
for by Frank McCormick, 191 Fourth street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. Important news. 

William Nilson, a native of Stavanger, Nor- 
way, last heard from at Buffalo, N. Y., in De- 
cember, 1907, is inquired for by his parents. 
Address, Nils Nilson, Nedre Blassenborg, No. 
9, Stavanger, Norway. 

Herbert Douglas, Lake Seamen's Union, 
No. 8400, is inquiring for his brother, John 
Douglas, who is supposed to have been seen 
recently in the Puget Sound country. He 
is 5 feet 8 inches in height, brown hair, blue 
eyes, fair complexion. Address Lake Sea- 
men's Union, 143 W. Madison street, Chicago. 

Members of the crew of the Olympia at 
the time of the accident to Charles Johnson, 
No. 4620, Lake Seamen's Union, while lying 
at the Lehigh Valley Coal Dock, in Su- 
perior, Wis., on August 23, 1907, are re- 
quested to send their addresses to the Head- 
quarters of the Lake Seamen's Union, Chi- 
cago, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABTTLA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

r'LEVELAND. 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANUA. N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, Wis 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SLPERTOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Third Street 

nr.DKNSRTmn, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM. Ont., Canada Box 235 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, Pa 222 State Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAOO. Ill 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, 11. L.. DETROIT, MICH.. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich, 

'■ icanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Saull Ste. Marie, Midi. 

Green Bay, Wis. Sheboygan, Mich. 

linn, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludington. Mioh, Superior. Wis. 

Manistee Mich, Toledo, o. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



NATIONAL ANTI-ASIATIC LEAGUE. 



We believe that the wisdom which is be- 
hind all manifestations of life works by 
types, and that such types are part of, or 
best developed by their natural environ- 
ment. This law appears to us as clear and 
universal in its application to the human 
species as to all other forms of life. The 
several grand divisions of mankind from 
time immemorial have been distinctly con- 
fined to certain habitats, separated by geo- 
graphical divisions and diverse climes. In 
the ages of the past natural barriers, vast 
spaces — oceans, mountains, inconveniences 
of travel and transportation — combined with 
racial hostilities and distinctions, have 
tended, in the main, to hold the several 
species of the human race within the limits 
of their several habitats, each progressing 
under the operation of the law of evolution 
and the law of environment. Thus the white, 
the yellow, the red, the brown and the black 
races of mankind have been preserved in 
their natural blood integrity and purity, to 
a great extent. 

In the beginning of this the twentieth 
century we find that modern methods of 
travel and communication have surmounted 
the barriers and distinctions above men- 
tioned and are rapidly bringing about start- 
ling changes in the political, industrial, and 
social status of mankind. We are now con- 
fronted with the question whether race in- 
tegrity and race types can long be preserved 
in this land, or in any land. In other words. 
are the several species of mankind doomed 
to destruction, and will mongrel blood wipe 
out the last vestige of race purity and race 
evolution ? 

The perpetuity of our liberties, and of the 
Republic itself, depends upon the question 
whether or not we can maintain here in our 
country the Caucasian race and the white 
man's civilization, pure and unimpaired. No 
two species of men have ever lived, or ever 
can live, in peace in the same habitat or coun- 
try. The white and the yellow or Mongolian 
race are entirely unassimilable, and their 
mingling in a racial, industrial, or social 
way means degradation to both, mongrel- 
ism, and the end of free institutions in this 
land, and in all the Western Hemisphere. 
The influx of the Chinese, Japanese and 
kindred races into the Pacific and Far West 
mountain States has already caused a crisis 
in the industrial and commercial life of that 
portion of our land. Unchecked, it will soon 
breed similar and worse troubles in the 
Middle West and the Atlantic States. Great 
forces of monopoly look with favor upon 
the introduction of Asiatic labor, not only 
on the Pacific Slope, but in the mines, the 
shops, and the industrial centers of the East. 
The failure to apply any efficient and perma- 
nent barriers to the immigration of Asiatics 
to our shores, by exercise of treaty making 
power, or by legislation in Congress, marks 
the silent but insidious force that works its 
way in Governmental affairs. The excuses 
that are made against the exclusion of Asi- 
atics, the specious plea raised concerning 
the so-called "Oriental trade," betoken the 
desire of the monopolistic "masters of in- 
dustry" to command and to exploit "cheap 
labor," Asiatic labor, here in this land and 
in this generation. Once a foothold is gained 
here for such labor, long drawn battlings, 
warfare itself, will be necessary before the 
American people are finally freed therefrom. 



Xow is the time to call the halt, and to that 
end the National Anti-Asiatic Immigration 
League of the United States is organized, 
and it calls for the aid of American citizens 
everywhere to unite in taking steps to do 
away with Asiatic immigration. Not to 
"minimize," but to abolish that evil, is the 
purpose of this League. 



GHENT A SEAPORT. 



The works which have in late years been 
carried on toward the improvement of the 
Terneuzen canal are advancing rapidly 
and the canal connecting Ghent with the 
North Sea will be completed about the be- 
ginning of next year. On Dutch territory 
the work has lately been pushed with great 
activity so that the greater part thereof is 
completed. The last contract for deepening 
and improving the harbor of Terneuzen, the 
Dutch end of the canal, was signed and 
passed by the Dutch authorities December 
18, 1907, and provided that within 300 days 
the new maritime lock at Terneuzen, fitted 
with machinery permitting the temporary 
working thereof by hand, be opened to ves- 
sels. When this lock is completed it will 
be worked by electricity. The existing 
locks permit the passing through into the 
Terneuzen canal of vessels of not more than 
17 feet draft, while the new lock will permit 
the safe passage of vessels of 25 feet. 

The dimensions of the new lock will be 
459 feet long, 59 feet wide, and 17 feet deep 
at low tide. The bridges on the canal will 
be opened and closed by electricity, while 
the total distance of 20 miles separating the 
port of Ghent from the sea will be fitted 
with electric arc lights placed at intervals of 
490 feet. The narrowest part of the canal 
is 220 feet at the surface of the water and 
78 feet at the bottom. The depth is 28>4 
feet. 

The length of the canal improved will be 
20 miles; 10^2 miles on Belgian territory 
and 9]/ 2 miles on Dutch territory. The total 
width over water line on Belgian territory 
will be 318 feet, while at the bottom the 
width will be 78 feet with a depth of 2%y 2 
feet. The width over water line on Dutch 
territory will be 220 feet 78^4 feet at bottom 
and the same depth. 

Commercial docks will be provided with 
wharfage facilities of a total length of 5,250 
feet, with nine sheds. The depth varies 
from 17 to 21 feet. Lumber docks will have 
919 feet of wharfage, 278 feet wide, with 
three sheds covering 83,292 square feet. The 
"foreharbor" will have 7,215 feet wharfage, 
295 feet wide, and a depth of 21 feet. 

The Terneuzen canal when completed 
will permit the safe entry of large trans- 
Atlantic cargo boats. The city authorities 
are informed that as soon as the improve- 
ments are completed a new line of steamers 
will ply from Ghent to Galveston. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATFORM. 



In Chile all saloons and places where 
spirituous liquors are sold must now be 
closed from 7 o'clock Saturday night until 
6 o'clock Monday morning, and all public 
holidays are treated the same as Sunday 
in this respect. 



A lake at Bassein, Burma, owned by the 
Government, stocked with varieties of table 
fish, brings an annual income of over $6,000. 
The Burma Government is taking steps to 
utilize Victoria Lake in the same way. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and at not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S 
Or AMERICA. 



UNION 



(Continued from Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAX FRANCISCO, Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER. B. C, Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts., 
P. O. Box 1335. 

TACOMA. Wash., 221 S North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
P.ox 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 334. 

PORTLAND, Or.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 2380. 

HONOLULU, H. T., 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10. P. 
Box 875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. 
Box 42. 

ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 



COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA. Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
aiso at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. 8. W. 



. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



TRAINING IN THE NAVY. 



In the old days of the Navy, when about 
the only requirement of men in the fo'castle 
was a knowledge of sailoring, the service 
was recruited almost exclusive from the sea- 
faring class. It was not essential that a 
man have any other qualifications for naval 
duty than to know how to "let go and haul," 
man a boat, and steer. It was not neces- 
sary for him to be an American citizen ; in 
fact, usually he was not. 

With the advent of modern naval con- 
struction, however, the demand arose for an 
entirely different class of men; seamanship 
was subordinated to machinery and elec- 
tricity. Nowadays a man must be an Amer- 
ican citizen, native or naturalized. He must, 
besides, furnish satisfactory evidence that 
he is of good moral character; but it is not 
necessary for him to have any knowledge 
of the sea — that is all taught him after he 
enlists. 

The crew of a battleship is composed of 
men with a great variety of trades, the 
larger portion of which are in the seaman 
branch. In order to train men for the du- 
ties required of them, the Navy Department 
has established three large training stations. 
They are located on Coasters' Harbor Is- 
land, in Newport Harbor, R. I. ; at Norfolk, 
Va. ; and on Yerba Buena Island, in San 
Francisco Bay. These stations receive 
young men between seventeen and twenty- 
five years of age, who enter the Navy as 
"apprentice seamen." Recruits are first as- 
signed to the "newcomers' squad," and are 
quartered in a separate building, where they 
receive close supervision at the start and 
are taught the necessity for naval discipline, 
regular habits, and implicit obedience to the 
orders of their superiors. They are also in- 
structed in the method of keeping their uni- 
forms and persons neat and clean, ready for 
inspection at all times ; they learn how to 
swim, if they do not already know how, 
swimming pools being provided indoors for 
winter months, with facilities for heating the 
water, and precautions taken to prevent ac- 
cident. 

The apprentice seaman is then assigned 
to a company or division, and he is soon able 
to master the various drills or evolutions. 
These drills consist of infantry tactics, set- 
ting-up exercises, riot formation, as well as 
artillery drill. He learns how to "box the 
compass" by means of a large painted repro- 
duction of a compass on the walls ; he ac- 
quires a knowledge of signaling, and a 
familiarity with the flags of all nations and 
international signal flags ; he learns how to 
heave the lead, the use of the log, how to 
tie knots, splice ropes, make hitches and 
bowlines, and is given general instruction 
in oldtime seamanship in the rigging loft. 
Later he is assigned to one of the yachts or 
small training ships attached to the station, 
for a cruise of a week or two in inland wa- 
ters, where he puts into practice the knowl- 
edge he has acquired at the station, and has 
a turn at the wheel. This brief experience 
on board ship teaches him also how to sling 
his hammock, and usually gives him his 
"sea legs," so that later, when he completes 
the course and goes on board a battleship, 
he is less apt to be seasick. During all the 
period his physical well-being is carefully 
looked after; calisthenic drills or setting-up 
exercises are held every day, and he has be- 
sides the benefit of a well-equipped gym- 



nasium. The hours of duty and instruction 
are not long, and ample time is allowed each 
day for out-door athletics if the weather per- 
mits, and for reading and study. 

The commissary department is one of the 
most important features of the station. 
Men are given three good, plain, appetizing 
meals a day, besides coffee or cocoa in the 
early morning. The bugle sounds at 5 :30 
A. M., and the boys tumble out promptly 
and lash their hammocks. After a bowl of 
hot cocoa or coffee comes an hour of scrub- 
bing up ; not only of clothing, but ham- 
mocks, covers, hammock bags, etc., which 
must all be cleaned, dried, and aired. At 
8 o'clock they fall in for breakfast ; after 
which there are quarters and prayers. From 
about 9 until noon the time is given over to 
study or instruction. After dinner the in- 
struction continues until 3 or 4, after which 
time until taps are sounded at 9 the appren- 
tice seaman is free to do as he pleases. 

In addition to the training stations for 
the instruction of apprentice seamen, the 
Navy maintains schools for electricians, 
machinists, artificers, yeomen (who form 
the clerical force of the Navy), seamen gun- 
ners, the hospital corps, and cooks and 
bakers. Recruits are received at all these 
schools direct from civil life, as well as from 
men in lower ratings already in the service. 
At each school a most complete course of 
instruction is given, which fits the men for 
the duties which will later be required of 
them on board ship ; but it also prepares 
them for following their trade in civil life, 
should they decide not to return to the ser- 
vice after their enlistment. The Navy aims 
to make its training so thorough that every 
man who leaves any one of its schools is 
competent to perform the duties of his trade. 
It receives boys with no previous training 
of any kind, develops their physique, 
hardens their muscles, broadens their chests, 
gives them a technical education, and offers 
them permanent occupation at a fair rate of 
pay at the start, with advancement in pay 
and position as fast as they become quali- 
fied. 

Men who complete the instruction at the 
training station are rated ordinary seamen, 
at $19 a month, or coal passer, $22. The 
higher ratings of the seaman branch are : 
Seamen, $24; and $30, $35, and $40 for petty 
officers, third, second, and first class. In 
the engine room the ratings are : Fireman, 
$30 and $35; oiler, $37; water tender, $40; 
plumber and fitter, $45 ; blacksmith and 
chief water tender, $50; coppersmith, $55; 
and boilermaker, $65. 

The artificer and special branches have 
four classes of petty officers, with pay cor- 
responding to the classification in the sea- 
man branch. Ship's cooks are paid $55, $40, 
$30 and $25, while bakers receive $45 and 
$35. The hospital corps consists of three 
ratings, paying $60, $30 and $20. 

The bluejacket must pay for his uniform 
after the initial outfit, but he gets it at actual 
cost. He is also required to purchase cer- 
tain "small stores," pay his barber bill, and 
keep his clothes clean. The necessary alter- 
ations to his uniform are made free of charge 
by the ship's tailor. It is customary for the 
chief petty officers' mess to contribute a 
small monthly sum for the purchase of deli- 
cacies not on the Navy ration. Other than 
these, the expenditures of an enlisted man 
are voluntary. 

Besides the regular pay and allowances 



for re-enlistment, continuous service, and 
good conduct, there are compensations for 
certain duties and for expertness. For in- 
stance : Coxswains of steam launches receive 
$5 a month; crew messmen and jacks-of- 
the-dust (the paymaster's "striker") are also 
allowed $5 ; signalmen get $3, $2 and $1 ad- 
ditional ; the crew of a submarine are paid 
an extra $5 a month ; besides a dollar a day 
for each day the boat is submerged ; gun 
pointers draw a bonus of $2 to $10, depend- 
ing on the size of the gun ; money prizes are 
also offered for skill at target practice 
Ship's tailors are paid for their extra duty 
$15 and $20, while the tailor's helper has $10 
added to the pay of his rating. 

A chief petty officer, after one year's ser- 
vice on board a man-of-war, receives $70 a 
month. To this should be added allowances 
for continuous service, good conduct medals, 
and re-enlistment money, which in two en- 
listments would amount to $11.47 a month. 
When it is remembered that his board, 
lodging, medical attendance, hospital care if 
sick, street-car fare, and traveling ex- 
penses cost him nothing, it will be seen 
that this pay compares very favorably 
with like occupation in civil life. It is pos- 
sible for a man to attain the rating of chief 
petty officer within one enlistment of four 
years ; and if he does not do so within eight 
years, he lacks the qualities for succeeding in 
any occupation. 

But he need not stop with the highest en- 
listed rank. After seven years' continuous 
service he can apply for a warrant, an inter- 
mediate rank between a chief petty officer 
and a commissioned officer. The pay ranges 
from $1,200 to $1,800 a year with an allow- 
ance for rations and commutation of quar- 
ters, which increases it by $200 to $300. 
There is also a chance for exceptional men to 
attain a commission, the examination bein£ 
limited to warrant officers with four years' 
service. To pass this examination means 
hard work, study, and faithful devotion to 
duty; but since the law authorizing the pro- 
motion of men from the ranks to commis- 
sioned grade was passed in 1901, a consider- 
able number of the candidates have each year 
attained the rank of ensign. — John R. Cox, 
in Scientific American. 



DREDGING AT DULUTH. 



The work on the big dredging contract in 
Duluth-Superior harbor held by the Great 
Lakes Dredge and Dock Company is being 
rushed to completion and the company is now 
confident that the work will be finished this 
fall. This means that the big job must be 
done before the bay freezes over, or about the 
end of November. 

The contract calls for the removal of ap- 
proximately 1,750,000 cubic yards of earth in 
the main harbor basin below the interstate 
bridge. The work is confined to the area just 
in front of the bridge and to the harbor basin 
directly off the yacht and boat clubs. En- 
larging the basin in front of the interstate 
bridge will give the big boats more room to 
make the turn into the upper harbor, and will 
thus help in preventing future collisions with 
the big draw. 

The appropriation this year for dredging in 
the harbor amounted to about $200,000. Twice 
again' as much will be asked from the next 
Congress to continue the improvement work. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA, CAL. 



The "return of prosperity and tin 
reopening of many industrial plants 
during the last month" have resulted 
in a decrease in the number of Ml 
listments for the Navy. 

At the final trial recently of the 
United States battleship New Hamp 
shire she developed 17,772 horsepower 
and a speed of 18.4 knots, exceeding 
the Government requirement of eight- 
een knots. 

Representatives of the German and 
Italian steamship lines, at a confer- 
ence held at Berlin. Germany, on 
September 16, decided to raise the 
rates at once between Mediterranean 
ports and New York $10. 

Vigorous appeals have been made 
to President Roosevelt and to the 
War Department by Atlantic steam 
ship lines for the opening to naviga- 
tion at night of the Ambrose Chan- 
nel in New York harbor. 

The Prince line steamship Spartan 
Prince has been lost at sea, aci 
ing to a dispatch received from Per- 
nambuco. The liner had been in col- 
lision with an unidentified bark. Cap- 
tain Smith and the crew, numbering 
30 men. were saved. 

An official statement issued at the 
Navy Department shows that naval 
vessels now under construction num- 
ber twenty. Of these four are battle 
ships, five torpedo-boat destroyers, 
seven submarine torpedo-boats, two 
colliers, and two tugboats. 

The lighthouse at the harbor of 
refuge on Delaware Bay has been 
completed and a final inspection made 
by Government employes shows that 
the structure is satisfactory in every 
respect. It has been officially ac- 
cepted by the Lighthouse Depart 
ment. 

While Philadelphia maritime and 
commercial interests are still talking 
of a steamship line between that port 
and New Orleans, announcement has 
been made that within thirty days 
such a service will be inaugurated 
between New York and New Or- 
leans. 

The Clyde liner Seminole rescued 
the crew of the abandoned schooner 
John A. Matheson, from Baltimore, 
174 miles north of Turks Island on 
September 19. The Matheson was 
dismasted and, becoming watcr- 
d. was abandoned by the crew 
on September 17. 

Secretary of the Navy Metcalf has 
commended Charles Daly, a seaman 
on the United States cruiser Cali- 
fornia, for heroism, in jumping over- 
board from the California off San 
Francisco, on August 20, and rescu- 
ing C. Mot/, a seaman, who had fallen 
overboard from a steam launch. 

The Pope, on September 20, re- 
ceived in audience seventy seamen 
from the United States battleships 
Maine and Alabama, which are at 
Naples. The Pontiff, who is always 
interested in seagoing men. expressed 
pleasure at their smart appearance. 
Each of the men kissed the Pope's 
ring and received from him a medal. 
Secretary of the Navy Metcalf on 
September 19 awarded the contract 
for the construction of ten torpedo- 
boat destroyers authorized at the last 
session of Congress. The awards 
are as follows: Two boats to each of 
the following companies: The Fore 
River Shipbuilding Company, the 
New York Shipbuilding Company, 
the Newport News Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, the Bath Iron Works and Wil- 
liam Cramp & Sons. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part <>f the city, county and 
mywhere ALONG THE coast. 



SMOKE, 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 

Beauty," the "Princess" and other 

high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second Street, 



Eureka, Cal. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period If 
not called or sent for. 



Aheng, C. 
Allen, J. W. 
Andersen, Albert 
Anderson, A. 1'. 



Kuntz, K. 
Larsen, H. J. 
Lattz, L. 
Lolime, E. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Imager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD. Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 




Foul Catarrh 

DEAFNESS, DYSPEPSIA, BLINDNESS, 
BAD BLOOD, DISEASE, DEATH, FOL- 
LOW THE RAVAGES OF FOUL 
CATARRH. 

Upon request we will send an abso- 
lutely free treatment which we know 
will immediately benefit any catarrh suf- 
ferer, no matter how long standing the 
disease may be. Not a patent nostrum, 
but a scientific remedy, put up from a 
specialist's prescription and guaranteed 
to be absolutely free from cocaine, mor- 
phine, chloroform or opiates of any kind. 
It's use is positively safe. If you want a 

Free Treatment 

all you need do is send your name and 
address at once to E. L. Baldwin, Phar., 
20-S Market St., San Francisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Charles Lagerberg is inquired for 
by his brother, Theodore. Address 
U. S. S. McAthur, Seldovia, Alaska. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

139 BBCOND STREET. COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 

PORTLAND, OR. 
WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc, 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
>3 N. Third Street, near Burnside 

Portland, Oregon. 

WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE "ALOHA" 

Harry Klemme, Proprietor. 

First-Class Rooms at very moderate 
rates. Summer garden attached. 

Ccr. Queen and Richard Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Anderson, HJalmar Larson, F., -1098 

Anderson, J., -1514 Lebrun, E. 

Anderson, A. Leaky, W., -S3E 

Anderson, Victor Leisman, J. 

Axes, P. Lepp, E. 

Carry, Thomas Lie, J. C. 

Baandsen, E. M. Lind, H. E. 

Barwa, D. Lindin, H. Van 

Bakke, M. C. l.indburg, John 

Bateman, S. J. Lindman, II. C. 

Bernard, S. Llndroos, C. 

Banners, Lichlenberg, Max 

Bensen, J. E. Lockey, II. 

Berg, H. M. Lunder, B. 

Bergren, John I.undquist, J. 

Bertelsen, Air. Lubeck. R. A. 

Bernsen, C. T. Lundblad, E., -78D 

Berkelund, R. Madison, Chas. 

Blomquist, B. Marthisen. M. 

Blomqulst, H. Mayers, P. M. 

I ;oman, O. W. Mannian, James 

Brander, M. F. Marthininssen, K. 

Bruhn. B , -14:10 McKerron, W. 

Buchtman, P. McAdam, J. 

Burke, James Meddicott, F. 

Casperson, Chr. Mikelson, C. 

Cornell, O. B. Mikkelson, Jos. 

Clarkson, C. H. Mortensen, Chr. 

Courtney, A. I. Mortensen, Holger 

Conigan, P. J. Mare, C. F. 

i<k, Geo. Murphy, D. 

Din wooden, Jas. H. Myren, A. 

an, James Nelsen, Martin 

Dowling, S. G. Newland, E. 

I 'rager, Otto Nielsen, Jorgen 

Edwards, E. M., -149Nielsen, Karl 

Edvardson, John Nielsen, N. C. 

Ekvall, G. A. Nyburg, Eric 

Ellingsen, P., -568 Olsson. E.,-966 

Elwood, Alf. Olsson, Johan 

Elliasen, H. O. Olsson, Otto 

Emersen, E. Olsen, H., -959 

Falch, O. A. Olsson, Oscar 

Faluck, L. Orchard. S. H. 

Farley, Geo. Overvik, Thos. 

Fitzgerald, H. Paulson, Paul 

Flynn, P. J. Petterson, O., -710 

Fournier, G. Petersen, Olavus 

Frohery, F. Pederse, Lars 

I Gad. V. Pedersen, O. A. 

Gent, A. C. Pedersen, Kristlan 

Gilifson, Frank Pendville, N. 

Gronlund, Oscar Pemberton, D. 

Grusden, Edw. Pietanzo, A. 

Gustarson, A. W.,Pfeirer, K. 

-700 Paige. L. 

Gudmundsen, J. Rasmussen, F. 

I Guttman, H. Rasmussen, N. C, 
1 Gulliver, W. H. -924 

Hehkonen, G. A. Sanches, F. 

Hansen, Jens M. Sehulz, E., -1842 

Hansen, E. A. Sibelin, Chr. 

Hansen, Mike Siverksen, S. B. 

daftness, M. Shane, J. 

Flagman, H. Sovig, C. 

Healey, James Soderlund, J. F. 

Helman, Karl Stuho, M. 

Hixon, J. W. Steinburg, A. 

Hange. A. Sundqulst, C. 

Haygard, T. S. Svensen, J. 

Holmgren, G. J. Swensson. B. 

Huslide. H. Text, Thos. 

Ivertsen, S. B. Tellefsen, P. 

Iversen, P. Tennant, T. 

Jamison, J. Thompson, R. 

Jacobson, H. J. Thoralls, L M. 

Jack, Paul Tuominen, Alf. 

Jasperson, J. Vagnhill, G. 

Jensen, Johannes Wahlstedt, A. R. 

Johansen, C. J. Wahlstedt, G. R. 

Johnson, Gunder Wankle, F. 

Johansen, Carsten Walz, E. 

Jaimson, Nils Wallace, A. 

.Terfold, Theo. Webber, C. 

Joaklnson, W. Whitley. A. 

Johnson, Alf. Winsmer, Geo. 

Karlson, K. A.. -551William3on. A. 

Kalmlng, J. Waulters, H. 

Kalnou, A. Worm, A. 

Kahlbetzer. F. Walters, W. 

Kleine. Carl Wokes, H. 

Klingenburg, J., -660Zimmer. W. 

Kristoffersen, Geo. 




Anaouncee Ore OPENING- of its 
NEW «TORB 

on •TTtursdaY, October 1st. looS. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &l CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Alexander & McBride 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

' PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Oscar Sunersson, last heard of 
about four years ago when employed 
in a tug at San Francisco, is inquired 
for by his brother. Address, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 

1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., of Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 

American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, - SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



£^ 1» /f ^"^V 1^r r W~~2''W~*% £T» See that this label (in light blue) 

^^ IV' I V J 1^*. I""* r^r ^?^ aiipcnrs on tllc '" >x '" wmcn 



you are served. 



<SEPll880?jEi§L .. 

Issued by AutDority of tne Cigar MaKers' International Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 

ShtS (JfVlrf ifS. lint lha Cloan contained minis box have been mada by a Flljt-ChsS WMoMI 
a KtVbrj) Of IH[ QCAA UMERJ 'IIITlFlNAIIONAl UNION or Am:iu. an oioaiuatjan devoted to the li- 
wncemenl of tbe MORAtMATERIAland IMEIIXCTUAI WllfARF. OF THf. CRAFT. Thenrforewe lecomnett 
these Cioarc to all s/ooktrs throuonout the wortrf. 

Ail Infringtffitou upon this UbaJ waif be punubad according tola* 

$ HC tiUfcuul, Prtadent, 

* Clf I UefAKma 



FAC 

SIMILE 



LOCAL 



STAMP 




BY INSISTING UPON PURCHAS- 
ING UNION STAMP SHOES 

You help better shoemaking conditions. 
You get better shoes for the money. 
You help your own Labor Position. 
You abolish Child Labor. 

Do Not Be Misled by retailers who 
say: "This shoe does not bear the 
stamp, but is made under Union Condi- 
tions." 

This is false. No shoe is union-made 
unless it bears the Union Stamp. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec -ireas. 




The Michigan State Federation of 
Labor went on record on September 
17 in favor of Woman Suffrage and 
against prohibition and local option. 

The eleventh biennial convention of 
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire- 
men and Enginemen opened at Colum- 
bus, O., on September 14, with about 
500 delegates present. 

One of the largest pay-rolls was dis- 
tributed to its thousands of employes 
by the Bethlehem Steel Works at 
South Bethlehem, Pa., on September 
17, when $170,000 in wages was paid 
out. 

An increase from 50 cents to 60 
cents an hour in the pay of linotype 
and monotype operators at the Gov- 
ernment Printing Office at Washing- 
ton, D. C, will be put into effect on 
October 1. 

A sign of the return of industrial 
activity was the notice recently issued 
at the New Jersey Zinc Works at 
South Bethlehem, Pa., that the plant 
would start up full on October 1. Em- 
ployment will be given to 600 men. 

The New Boston colliery of the Mill 
Creek Coal Company, at Mahoney 
City, Pa., has shut down on account 
of the water shortage. The New Bos- 
ton strippings also suspended. About 
1000 employes were thrown out of 
work. 

Because of a strike of quarrymen 
which started recently, all manufac- 
turing departments of the Atlantic 
Portland Cement Company at Hanni- 
bal, Mo., ceased operations on Sep- 
tember 19. The shutdown is caused by 
lack of material and affects 2500 men. 

Four hundred employes of the 
Philadelphia (Pa.) Mint, who had been 
idle since June 28, resumed work on 
September 9. The increased demand 
for small coin caused the resumption. 
Of the employes returning to work, 
most are coining, smelting and rolling 
mill hands. 

Thirteen mills of the American 
Sheet Tin Plate Company at Vander- 
grift, Pa., were shut down recently be- 
cause the boilers of the mills had been 
rendered useless by the acid that has 
accumulated in the Kiskiminetas River 
during the low stage of water, due to 
the drought. 

Fifty-five men have been killed in 
building the new Blackwell's Island 
bridge over the East River, according 
to the report of a committee of the 
Central Federation Union of New 
York. The committee also found that 
15 workmen have met death in the 
Chelsea docks improvement. 

Moore Bros, and Pierce & Co., glass 
manufacturers of Clayton, Pa., expect 
to resume work shortly. The boy 
help problem is the only foreseen ob- 
stacle to a prosperous blast. The 
glass factories at Glassboro will start 
in a few days. The fires in the furnaces 
of the big house have been lighted. 

Retail prices of food in 1907 were 
higher than in any other year of the 
eighteen-year period from 1890 to 
1908, being 4.2 per cent higher than in 
1906. The average retail prices of 
twenty-nine of thirty staple articles 
investigated by the United States 
Bureau of Labor were higher in 1907 
than in 1906. The articles which 
showed the greatest advance in prices 
are flour, 8.9 per cent; butter, 8 per 
cent; evaporated apples, 7.8 per cent; 
milk, 7.4 per cent; cornmcal, 6.8 per 
cent; cheese, 6.7 per cent; and pota- 
toes 5.6 per cent. The only article 
which showed decrease is tea, the de- 
crease being 2 per cent. 



14 



O (AST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The total immigration to the United 
States during August was 27, 783, while 
ilming August, 1907, the immigration 
numbered 98,825. 

Governor Hughes of New York was 
renominated for that office by the Re- 
publican State convention at Saratoga, 
X. V., on September IS. 

More than seventy-five Esquimos, 
comprising an entire village on the 
Siberian coast, were recently dis- 
covered dead from cold and hunger. 

The Controller of the Currency on 
September 25 issued a call on National 
Banks for a statement of their condi- 
tion at the close of business on Sep- 
tember 23. 

Practically all the leading countries 
were represented at the fourth Inter- 
national Fisheries Congress, which 
convened in Washington, D. C, on 
September 22. 

A dispatch from Batchelor, La., 
says a negro named John Miles was 
lynched there on September 15 for 
shooting a white man. The white man 
was not seriously hurt. 

Chicago's population was placed at 
1,924,060 by the official census com- 
pleted on September 17. The census 
taken four years ago gave the popula- 
tion of the city as 1,714,144. 

George L. Glunt, superintendent of 
the 119-inch mill of the Carnegie Steel 
Company at Homestead, Pa., has re- 
signed his $10,000 a year position to 
enter the Presbyterian ministry. 

Six persons were killed and thirty 
injured, four of whom are not ex- 
pected to live, as the result of an ex- 
plosion of a car of black powder at 
Windsor, near Sedalia, Mo., on Sep- 
tember 15. 

Because they were sent to school 
with negro children, sixty white pupils 
of the seventh and eighth grades of 
the Lincoln School at Topeka, Kas., 
walked out of the classroom on Sep- 
tember 24. 

For the first time in public school 
history a course in saleswomanship, 
designed in retail and department 
stores, will be incorporated this year 
in the curriculum of the evening high 
schools for women in New York City. 

Twenty-one persons were killed, 
nine seriously and about thirty slightly 
injured in a collision on the Great 
Northern Railroad at Young's Point, 
about thirty miles west of Billings, 
Mont., on September 25. 

A sweeping interpretation of the 
[mmigration laws, one which may give 
the United States jurisdiction over the 
liberty of all aliens, no matter how 
long they have been in the country, 
is being made by the Immigration 
Bureau. 

A. feature in connection with the 
Fisheries Congress in session recently 
at Washington, D. C, is the offer of 
prizes aggregating $2200 in gold for 
the best essays on the most important 
fishery investigations, discoveries and 
inventions in the past three years. 

A fog of London-like density at Chi- 
cago, 111., in the early hours of Sep- 
tember 17 was responsible for three 
railroad accidents of minor character, 
slight injuries to over a score of per- 
son., two deaths at Grand Crossing, 
and minor accidents all over the city. 

Postmaster General Meyer has is- 
sued an order directing all postmast- 
ers to unite with their local school au- 
thorities, with the view of adopting 
the most effective method of instruct- 
ing school children as to the organiza- 
tion and operations of the Postal Serv- 
ice. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letteis at the San Francisco Sailors' 

Union Office arc advertised for three 

months only ami will be returned to the 

olii- at the expiration of five 

months fr late of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notily 
!• Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
I,, the port of their destination. 



Aaltonen. U. 
Abrahamsen, Chas. 
Adams, D. J. 
Alvarez, F. Lopez 
Andersen, A. Emil 
Andersen. -1233 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Nils A. 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, Olaf 
Anderson, -764 
Anderson. 
Anderson, C. 
Anderson, A. C. 
Banke, -1646 
Bateman, S. J. 
I ;.i. aim, V. 
Barry, Michael 
Bastian, W. 
Bauman, Ernest 
Bausback, Erwln 
Becker, Fred W. 

P. 
Behrends, G. 

ns, Fred 
Bensen, -143 
Bensen, B. 
Bensen, H. 
Benson, -1454 
Benson, John E. 
Bentheusen, H. 
Berg, Julius 
Berndt, Hugo 
Bernert, Fred 
Campbell, Geo. 
Carstensen, M. F. 
Caspary, August 
Chrlstensen, Wm. 
Christensen, Viggo 
Christensen, -1126 
Christensen, -905 
1 .-allien, Hugo 
Dahlof, John 
Dalman, F. 
Hanberg, A. 
Danielstn, Sigurd 
I avidsen, Jacob 
De Baers, Henry 
den Haan, C. 
Easton, R. W. 
Kkendahl, -565 
Ekholm, Frans 
Eklund, Ellis 
Ekstedt, Harold 
Eliasen, E. 
Ellefsen, Andreas 
Elliott, E. 
Engelgren, Ludv. 
Engman, Chas. 
Falk, John A. 
Fatt, Knut 
Figvtd, Sigurd 
Findley, H. 
Fischer, Torsten 
Fjelman, Jonas 
Forslund, Victor 
Gad, Sophus 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Gonzalez, Juan 
Gere, A. 
Gillholm, Albin 
Govan, A. 
Grant, John 
Grawert, Johan 
Green, Hilding 
Gudmansen, A. B. 
Haagensen, M. 
Haak, R. 
Haasenritter, Carl 

lartsen, M. 
Ilaier, Fred 
Hall, W. F. 
Hamniargrin, O. 
Hansen, Marius 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen, -777 
Hansen, -1381 
Hansen, -1680 
Hansen, -1723 
Hansen, C. J. 
Hansen, J. P. 
Hanssen, Nikolai 
Harris, John E. 

on, Isaac 
Jameson, Joe 
Jansen, Eilert 
Janson, -1779 
Jarvie, W. 
Jensen, Jas. B. 
Jensen. Niels E. 
Jensen, Jens P. 
Jensen, -1578 
Jensen, Rasmus 
Jensen, -1634 
.lenson, Johannes 
Johansen, Joaklm 
Johansen, Theo. 
Johansen, A. F. 
Johanson, Elis R. 
Johansen, Sigurd 
Johansen, C. L. 
Johansen, Hjalmar 
Johansson, F. 
Kaasik, A. 
Kahlbetzer, Ferd 
Kalning, J. P. 
Kalnis, Harry 
Kane, G. 
Kohne. Ernst 
Kerstein, Carl 
Klint. Herman 
Karlsen, Karl J. 
Karlson, -1158 
Karlsson, C. E. 
Karlsson, N. 
Karsberg, C. 
Kastberg, Karsten 
Klemm, A. 

Laanti, Moses 
Lagerberg, Chas. 
Lahmeyer, H. 
l.andgren, J. 
Bang, Chas. 
Lantz, Gustaf 
I .arsen, -1271 
Larsen, Ludv. J. 
Larsen, Lars 
1. arsen, -1290 
1. arsen, Louie 
Larsen, -1842 
Larsen, -644 



Anderson, II. A. 
Anderssen, -1298 
Andreasen, M. 
Andersson, -1246 
Andersson, 1552 
Andersson, Ernst 
Andreassen, -1334 
Anenson, Gus 

-i'ii, Isak 
Aske, John 

a, Knut 
Atkinson, Samuel 
Axelsen, Axel 

Beyerle, Ruppert 
Blair. Francis 
Bluhm. Albert 
Bodungen, F. 
Boisen, J. 
Boogren, Eric 
Borresen, Niels 
Boss, L. A. 
Bo via n. C. J. 
Bowland, Chas. 
Brander, Oscar 
Brandsten, Ernst 
Brandt, Fred 
Biovvn, John 
Burdt, Paul 
Burger, A. 
Burke, Eugene 
Burmeister, T. F. 
Burnett, Chas. C. 
Burns, Chas. E. 
Christensen, E. H. 
Christoffersen, Beige 
Christoffersen, -614 
Christophersen, C. 
Clarke, R., -1117 
Coadon, -481 
Corneliusen, Jens 

Doose, Wm. 
Utkender, M. 
Dories, H. 
Dowe, John 
Dreifeldt, Alb. 
Dryden, Wm. 
Dyrnes, Ludv. E. 

Eriksen, -595 
Eriksen, Leonard 
Erickson, Mike 
Erickson, -493 
Eriksen, Edmund 
Eriksen, Anton 
Eriksson, -333 
Eeklldsen, N. P. 
Espensen, E. N. 
Evensen, Andrew 
Foss, Laurits L. 
Foyn. San, 
French, J. A. 
Friebel, Herman 
Frivold, John 
Fuchel, Gustav 

Guillou, Joseph 
Guldberg, Randoli 
Gundersen, Johan 
Gundersen, Tandrup 
Gunderson, Christ 
Gunn, Bert 
Gunther, Theo. 
Gustalsson, J. E. 
Guzek, B. 

Harris, J. 
Haupt, Emil 
Heesche, Heinrieh 
I less. August 
Hill, G. 
Hines, Jas. 
Hjort, Knut 
Hochmann, Aleck 
Hogstrom, A. J. P. 
H ohman, H. 
Hoist, R. 
Holland, E. Scott 
Holmlund, Arthur 
Holt, Karl C. 
Hull, Hendrick 
Hustede, Heinrieh 
Hutchinson, Ed. 
lversen, Andreas 
Johansson, -1677 
Johansson. Nils 
Johnsen, Edward 
Johnsen, -1064 
Johnsen, J. P. K. 
Johnson, Gus. 
Johnson, -1877 
Johnson, -393 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, G. Edwin 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Chas. 
Johnson, J. E. 
Johnson. David E. 
Jones, Magnus P. 
Jones, P. 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Jurgensen, H. 
Justersen, Peter 
Klintberg, Chas. 
Knutsen, Knut 
Kopman, J. 
Koso, Pet 
Kossow. M 
Krauschat, A. 
Kristensen, -1088 
Kristensen. Karl 
Kristoffersen, Karl 
Kenny, G. 
Kristoffersen, O. T. 
Kugam. Fred J. 
Kunedt, Wm. 



Larsen. Knut C. 
Larsen, Einar A. 
Lausmann, John 
Laws, Harry 
Leahy, -925 
Lenn, Tonny 
Lersten, J. O. 
Lewald, n. 
Llesman, Fritz 
I.lljifalk, S. 
Lindbcrg. John 
Lindholm, E. A. 
Lindfors, Karl 



Lindkvist, -1014 
Llndroos, Oscar 
Lindstrom, Anton 
Loenecke. -1321 
Lowena, J. 
Lucas, J. W. 
Madsen, Thorolf 
Magnuson, Gust. 
Magnussen, Axel 
Martinson, A. 
Mason, Chas. 
Mason, C. 
Mattson, K. J. 
Mayer, Peter 
McAdam, J. 

Met 'lie, T. D. 

M i : i j ire, John 
McKenzle, John 
Nelson, Charles 
Nelson, Geo. 
Nester, Wilson 
Neumann, Aug. 
Nicolaisen, Otto 
Nicolaysen, H. 
Nielsen, Sivert 
Nielsen, Geo. 
Oberg. C. W. -790 
O'Keefte, W. 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, Emil M. 
Olsen, Chas. 

Olsen, A. H. 
Parikka. Herman 
Pearson, John S. 
Pedersen, Louis 
i 'edersen, 
Pedersen, Carl C. 
1'ederson, L. R. 
I'endville, N. 

al, Wm. 
Persson, Chas. 
Petersen, -645 
Petersen, Bertel 
Uaaliange, J. F. 
Hasmussen, -497 
Rasmussen, E. 
Keinhold, Ernst 
Relnwald, Erik 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Kigoulot, Bert 
Hints, T. 
Roalsen, Fred E. 
Kobett, John D. 

.-. Vincent 
Sanders, Frank 
Sandqvist, C. G. E. 
Sawberg, A. 
Schafer, Paul 
Sehmehl, Jas. P. 
Schmidlen. -1987 
Schmidt, Alfred 
Schmidt. Fritz 
Schultman, John 
Schumacher, Wm. 
Schwltzer, Herman 
Seegers, Wm. 
Semberg, John 
Shannon, H. C. 
Siiiffer. Chas. R. 
Sigurd, Gustaf 
Simpson, L. C. 
Smdahl, Jens 
Slven, Viktor 
Plvertsen, Geo. 
Sjogren, K. A. 
Tamm, A. 
Tauson, R. 
Teitzen, B. H. 
Templeman, R. 
Thomal, -273 
Thomas, Frank 
Thomson, Hans 
Uella, Ole 
Veiss, -1107 
Virak, M. 

Von den Steene, J. 
Vongehr, Ewald 
YVahi. J. 
Waldo. Wm. 
Wells, Leo L. 
Wahlberg, Rudolf 
Wasenius, Sigurd 
Wells, Geo. 

berg, N. G. 
Westerlund, Paul 
Winters. C. J. 
Young, R. 
Zarnow, Otto 



Lukman. Ewald 
Lund, -699 
Lunde. Olaus M. 
Lundin, Chas. 
Lundin, A. 

McKenzle, -1775 
McLean. John 
Melander, Gus. 
Mendiola, Joseph 
Mersman, A. 
Meyer, Frank 
Meyers, Herman 
Michell, Arthur 
Moller, Jens 
Mortimer, Ernst 
Munby, N. J. W. 
Murphy, Howard 

Nielsen. -884 

Niisen. Fred 
Nilsen, Hans 
Niisen, -784 
Nilsson, Nat. 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norton, Jack R. 
Nyman, Gus 
Olsen, olaf E. -59 
Soren 
i. Jorgen 
Olson, -717 
i Ussoii. Wm. 
Olsson, -945 

,-■'11. Carl 
Pettersen, Jens O. 
I'etersen, Oscar C. 
Peterson, John 
Pilos, Louis 
Poison, 
1'orter, G, 
Pratt. I 
Pratt, Louis 

I'rinz, Chas. 
Rokencs. Antin 
Roll, Aug 
Roscheck, Paul 
Rosenblad, -761 

Rosenvald. Isak 

Rosenqvist, H. A. 

Ruckle, Erwin 
Hud. Louis 

:. C. 
Ryberg, Sverre 
Sjoblom, Anton 
Skyskan, M. 
Smith. John A. W. 

s Istrup, E. 

Sola. Emanuel 
Sonora, Wm. 
Stack, Jacob 

au, Johan 
Steen, II D, 
Steffens, D. 
Steine, -2120 
Stone. Robert 
Strand, -1786 
Suaminen, O. 
Sund, Alecks 
Sundman, Gus. 
Svendsen, -1050 
Svensson, Nik 
Swanson, J. 
Swanson, Hugo 
Swensen, Carl 

Thoresen, Th. A. 

a, Arvld 
Tjellman, Jonas 

■ If. 

Peter 

He, Louie 
Tyson, Win. W. 
ristad, Kristian 
von Villemayor. W. 
Yortmann, Wm. 
Vucic, V. 

Welscn, Julius 

Wikstrom, n. h. e. 

Wilde, Herman 
Wilson. Herman 
Winter. Gotthard 
Winther, Hans 
Wirak, Hugo 
Worm, A. 



Zebe, Gustav 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



PACKAGES. 

Applv to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Andersen, A. C. -1108 Johansen, A. -1705 
Camaghan, Wm. i.iilie, F. F. 
Faslg, Don. McCoy, Chas. 

'■n, Lars Si hmehl, J, P. 

Heller. Olaf 'I bonison, Carl 



Anderson, Nils. 
Anderson, Axel. 
Andersson, -907 
Andersson, -1447 
Bertelsen, -1223 
Boysen, P. A. 
Carlson, Leo 



Morris, L. 
Markham, H. 
Mattson, W. 
Maibohrn. H. 
Nllson, Karl 
OUgreen. K. 
Olsen, E. -515 



Christensen, AndersPettersen, -1164 
Christensen, -178 Petterson, -1037 



Carlson, K. E. 
Emanuelsen, A. 
Eliasen, E. 

Ellingsen, J. 
Foster, O. 
Hope, Ole 



Rytko, O. -716 
Raymond, L. 

10. 
Smith, J. C. 
Sw.nson, Ben 
Slender, A. 



Hendricksen, H. R. Storvick, I. 



ii, Lars. 

Johanneses, M. h 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Nils 
Jalonen, J. 
Kjellgreen, A. B. 
Lau. G. 
Liliebeck, C. 

Lewis, J. M. 

Lunder, B. 
Le Goffic, W. 



Saar, II. 
Solberg, O. 

Simon, A. 
rtby. Carl 
Vongher, E. 
Vlereck, H. 

Westburn, T. 
Weekauf, H. 
Werner, E. 

Well. L. 

\\ estergren, Ch. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Allen, Fred Ingebretsen, Carl -69 

Andersen, Carl -1537 Kelly, John 
Anderson, Albert B. Kloot, J. 

-1568 Kolp. Otto Louis 

Anderson, Martin Kruger, Gustav 

-38 Lowe, John A. 

Barnard, C. Madsen, G. F. -1677 

Benson, Fred McDonough, Ed. 

Blumer, Mase McFarlane 

Brooker, F. Molen, D. V. D. 

Carlson, Chas. 1087 Nilson, Alf. 



Cottin, Albert 
Eklund, Aug. 
Eliasen, Carl 
Guyader, Georges 
Ifaltnes, Magnus 
Johanson, K. 
-1396 



Olsen, Martin 
i Usen, Carl -908 
Petersen, Chas. -472 
Lundquist, Walter 
W. 
.1 Webber, John 
Wellsen, Alfred 



Honolulu, H. T. Letter List. 



Andersen, F. C. 
'ndersen, A. L. 
Andersen. Einar 
Clahsen, H. 
Campbell, N. 



Ferraris, J. 
Holm, J. 

Janssen, H. -1555 
Helinor, Belin J. 
Thomas, J. W. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Lonnquist, Ossian 
Lerch, Paul 

Lindholm. A. 
Lundquist, Fred 
Meijer, O. W. G. 



Anderson, Carl 

Andersson, J. S. 

Aeckerle, E. 

Bagdon, W. 

Berthelsen, Alfred 

Berghold, Hermann Madsen, -1677 

Coye, Chas. Nelson, Johan 

Christoffersen, Olaf Newmann, Curt 

Espensen, Espen N.Olsen, Osvald 

Fjelstad, John Osvald, T. 

Gunther, Hans Olson, John 



Holmes, T. A. 
Hartman, Chas. 
Mollins, Frank 
Holmberg, O. B. 

all, S. G. 
Jensen, Peter 



Osol, Theo. K. 
Petersen, William 
Peterson, Nicolal 

-1235 
Petersen, Frank 
Sollen, Le 



Jensen, Hans. -1S26 Schmidt, Alfred 
Jahnke, Arthur Shallow, John 

Johansen, H., -2126Schultz, Axel 
Johannesen, -1441 Sjostrom, T. E. 



Johnson, C. A. 
Knudsen, Peder 
Kone, Ernest 
Kreman, Martin 
Knutson, A. 
Koch, Carl 



Saar, Hans 
Stenzel, Walter Otto 
Teigland, T. 
Tupitz, Con 
Wlnche, August 
Yates, James 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 

Andersen, Hjalmar Karvonen, Lars 

Asker, S. J. Le Fort, Guervls 

Hoffman, Tom Moberg, Alf. 

Henriksson, G. H. Williams. Chas. 

Jensen, Ingwald M. Wilson, Herman 




SET YOUR COURSE 

FOR THE 

Store that Sells 



Bossed 

'UNION WE 
OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

SAN FRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



DEMAND THE BRAND 




S3. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital J 1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,453,983.62 

Deposits, June 30, 1908 34,474,554.23 

Total Assets 37,055,263.31 

Remittances may be made by Draft, 
Post Office, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 
o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 7 
o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. for receipt 
of deposits only. 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte. 
Ign. Steinhart. I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 

THE HARRISON 

Newly furnished rooms. 

456 HARRISON ST., Corner First, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Hot and cold running water in 
every room; electric lighted and free 
baths. Terms $1.50 per week up. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bell, and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. P. 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 199 Steuart St. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Anderson, Olaf 
Anderson, S. 
Armmi, Walter 
Bastrom, C. 
Christensen, E. H. 
Gustafson, Edward 
Gunther, Theo. 
Isaacson, Gustave 
Johnsen, J. -25 
Karlsson, E. 
Knudsen. Jacob E. 
Larsen, M. 
Lorensen, O. C. 
Mlcheli, Agagtina 



Mettemeijer, J. F. 
Moersmand, Gastan 
Niccolie, Sant. 
Nilsen, Ruder 
Nyland, Sven 
Oman, Victor 
Plattner, Fred 
Pateejanske, R. 
Shuels, Christ. 
Skutul, A. 
Simpson, Lewis C. 
Svensen, Olaf 
Teigland, G. 
Thortensen, Peter 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 

CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



SOMETHING NEW 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE NICOTINE DESTROYER. 

"ANTIDOTE," the Catalytic Pipe has Four 
Important Advantages which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

. 1. The "ANTIDOTE" needs No Break- 
ing in. Every smoker knows the terrors 
of the first few smokes in an ordinary 
Pipe. The First Smoke in an "ANTI 
DOTE" is as sweet as an ordinary 
Pipe sweetened by Long Usage. 

2. The "ANTIDOTE" can not 
burn out. The Catalytic lining pro- 
tects the briar. 

3. The "ANTIDOTE" is always 
Dry even with constant smoking 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scien- 
tifically destroys the Nicotine, 
making it evaporate. A por- 
ous lining filled with Coal Tar 
Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 




placed in 
the bowl 
of a briar 
pipe, this is 
called the 
Catalyser; the 
smoke passing 
over the Cata- 
lyser produces 
Formol. This For- 
mol turns all the 
moisture and Nico- 
tine into steam, caus- 
ing it to pass off into 
the air and evaporate. 
All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes 
are hand made, of the 
Best French Briar. 



KASSER BROS. 



Distributors 
19 MARKET STREET 
S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 
Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 



Buy Your 

Clothing, Hats 
and Shoes 

From 

C. ). SWANSON 

Oilskins, Rubberboots, Suit- 
cases, Trunks, Valises, 
Bedding, Pillows and 
Blankets 

STYLISH GOODS 
LOW PRICES 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

119 EAST ST. 

Between Washington and 
Merchant Streets 

San Francisco 
Suits Made to Order. 




When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Wilhelm Schumacher, a native of 
Duisburg-Ruhrort, Germany, is in 
quired for by the German Consul, 51 
Third street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific is 
inquired for by his father. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

5 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 




Count Tolstoy received 2500 tele- 
grams from all parts of the world 
congratulating him upon the celebra- 
tion of his 80th birthday. 

The British War Office has placed 
with a Chicago firm another large con- 
tract for American beef and the Ad- 
miralty is negotiating for a contract 
for the Navy. 

The University of Warsaw, which 
has been closed since 1905, was re- 
opened recently with 600 students. The 
Poles have decided to boycott the 
university. 

An entire gun crew of thirteen men 
were killed by an explosion in a gun 
turret on the French cruiser La 
Touche Freville, at Toulon, France, 
on September 22. 

The house shown to tourists as the 
ancient palace of the Capulets at Ve- 
rona, Italy, which is associated with 
the story of Romeo and Juliet, has 
been completely destroyed by fire. 

The total number of cholera cases 
in the municipal hospitals alone at St. 
Petersburg, Russia, reach 4851, and 
there have been 1579 deaths. A total 
of 976 patients have been discharged 
as cured. 

Forty-three additional cases of 
cholera were reported at Manila, P. 
I., in one day recently. Of this num- 
ber seventeen victims were dead when 
discovered and the others died sub- 
sequently. 

Sharp frost and clear weather have 
contributed to check the spread of the 
cholera at St. Petersburg, Russia. For 
the iwelve hours ending at noon on 
September 25 357 new cases and 162 
deaths were reported at the municipal 
hospitals. 

Three cadets attending the military 
school at Vilna, Russia, were recently 
condemned by court-martial to exile 
in Siberia for having formed a society, 
which operated through the cadet of- 
ficers, to prepare the cadets for revolu- 
tionary activity. 

Encouraged by the success that has 
attended the establishment of his 
"hero fund" in the United States, An- 
drew Carnegie has decided to found a 
similar fund in his native land. To 
this end he is about to hand over to 
trustees the sum of $1,250,000. 

Twenty-two bulls escaped from the 
arena at Noita, Spain, on September 
21, and ran amuck through a crowd 
that was assembling to witness a bull- 
fight. Seven persons were killed and 
twenty wounded. Troops were sum- 
moned and shot the animals. 

The British ship Loch Finlas, from 
Port Pirie, South Australia, for Callao, 
was wrecked off Foster Island, on the 
northeast coast of Tasmania, on Sep- 
tember 27, and twenty of the crew of 
twenty-four were drowned. 

The festivities held throughout 
Mexico recently in celebrating the 
anniversary of the nation's inde- 
pendence and of the birth of Presi- 
dent Diaz have been made the occa- 
sion for mass-meetings and the adop- 
tion of resolutions calling upon Por- 
forio Diaz to accept another term as 
President. 

Italian and French delegates had a 
meeting at Aosta, Italy, recently, to 
appoint a commission to study a proj- 
ect of excavating a gallery through 
Mont Blanc. The gallery would 
shorten the distance between Italy and 
Paris, and the French and Italian 
Governments are taking deep interest 
in the project. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Nol Willow Alone. — Tomdix — "In 
speaking of Mrs. Weeds why do you 
persist in calling her a 'widow wom- 
an'? Why not say 'widow' alone?" 

liojax — "But Mrs. Weeds is quite 
good-looking, and a good-looking wid- 
ow is seldom alone." — Chicago News. 



Wanted a Wife. — "So this patent 
savings bank isn't complete enough 
for you?" 

"No; 1 want something that will 
take my pay envelope away from me 
every Saturday, and dole me out 
money by the nickel." 

"Then you'd better get married." 
Kansas City Journal. 



Consistency. — "He is a faddist on 
the subject of making all his actions 
harmonize.'' 

"lie carries it to extremes, doesn't 
he?" 

"I should say so: Why. when he 
went We^t to see the native Indians 
be wouldn't get any other kind but a 
scalper's ticket." — Baltimore Amer- 
ican. 



The Lie Direct. — Coster (who has 
been rebuffed by short-tempered 
tal clerk) — "Well, mister, you might 
just tell me if I post this letter now 
will it get to Birmin'am ter-morrow 
mornin'?" 

Clerk- -"Yes, of course it will." 
Coster — "Then you're a liar, 'cos 
it's addressed to Sheffield!" — The 
Sketch. 



Middle and Both Ends.— "Hubby. 
I need a pair of shoes and a new 
hat." 

"There you go again, going to ex 
tremes. Why didn't you be careful 
and keep in the middle with ex- 
penses?" 

"Well — er — I was just about to say 
I also want a belt with a gold buckle!" 
— New York Globe. 



ARE YOU A HUMBOLDT MAN? 

Humboldt men are always ready for 
an emergency in life — they have pro- 
vided for to-morrow, by saving the 
profits of to-day. Profits should be 
deposited as savings accounts, and 
allowed to accumulate with interest. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

Open Saturday Evenings from 6 to 8 
o'clock to receive deposits. 



Hotel Santa Fe 

684 Folsom St., near 3d St. 

Over 100 sunny rooms to let. Fur- 
nished up to date. Electric light, 
running hot and cold water. Baths 
free. Kates $2 to $3 per week, 35-50- 
75c per night- 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Affiliated with 

THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 

Authorized Capital (Combined) $800,00"' 

pital and Surplus 385,000.00 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

CI IAS. NELSON, President HENRY WILSON 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, Vice-President ALBERT SUTTON 

I.. M. Ma. POX ALU, Cashier C. S. WRIGHT 

J. C. ESCHEN W. II. LITTLE 

f ; interest paid on Savings Deposits. 
Money transmitted to all parts of the world at lowest rates, 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 
THE 

United States Nautical College. 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD 



Principal 



The oldest navigation school on the 
Pacific Coast (established 1S75) offers you 
advantages that can not be obtained else- 
where. 

Our methods are short, thorough, con- 
rise and practical; the prices are moder- 
n. 1 you are assured of a "square 
deal." 

HOTEL MOHAWK 

EAST STREET • - San Francisco 

Good accommodation for students. 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

IIEADOUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

INo. A MISSION ST., near Kast, SAN FRANCISCO 



Hand Tailored 
Union Made 

Suits \ $12.50 
Overcoats to 

Raincoats ) $25.00 

Wallenstein & Frost 
824 Market St. 

Opposite 4th St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



J. COHEN &. CO. 
Baltimore Olothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
Boss of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 




K! Most Reliable Jewelry House R5 
SORENSEN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

RELIABLE JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

SPECTACLES FITTED, EYES EXAMINED FREE 

Main Store 715 MARKET ST., near Call Building. 

Branch Store, 2593 Mission St., near Twenty-second. 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for 2 Year* 



J0HNJ.BAGLEY&C0. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturers 

PIPE TOBACCOS 

Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 

UIVIOIN 




MADE 



The Most Thorough and the Best Equipped Nautical School in San Francisco 

VON SCHOEN'S 

Navigation School 



SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE 



242 Steuart St., near Folsom 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



H. SAMUEL,. 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Francisco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods. Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits 
a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the 
t market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



Taylor's Nautical School 

established 1888 

510 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Largest and best equipped private Nautical School on the Continent of 
America. 

Henry Taylor (Attorney and Counsellor at Law), Lecturer in Naviga- 
tion and Maritime Law. 

WILLIAM B. PAGE, Class Instructor. 



Capt. Christensen's 



School of 
Navigation 



82 Market St., Room 23 







FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXII, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1908. 



Whole No. 1085. 



HARBOR OF SAN FRANCISCO. 






AT THE coming election the citizens of 
California will vote upon a proposition to 
increase the facilities of San Francisco 
harbor. The Legislature, in 1907, passed an Act 
providing for the issuance of bonds in the sum of 
$1,000,000 for the purchase of certain submerged 
lands at the mouth of Islais Creek, which, it is 
estimated, will provide a dock frontage equal to 
the total of existing facilities. It remains for the 
people to approve the proposed bond issue. 

The following statement sets forth in detail the 
argument in favor of the bond issue: 

Commerce follows the flag with not half the 
persistency that it follows harbor improvements. 
Wherever a community with deep water facilities 
has failed to keep up with the economic develop- 
ment of its back country or the requirements of 
modern sea-going vessels, which are ever increas- 
ing in size and tonnage, that community has a 
hard time to maintain its place. 

In recognition of this, the last Legislature 
passed the India Basin Act, which is to be rati- 
fied by the people in November. This law pro- 
vides for the issuing of bonds not to exceed the 
sum of one million dollars for the condemna- 
tion and purchase of sixty-four blocks of land 
adjacent to Islais Creek to be used for an inland 
harbor. This harbor will double the present 
wharfage of San Francisco. 

One of the recent examples of a failure to take 
advantage of conditions analogous to those exist- 
ing in San Francisco is that of London, England. 
This world-famed harbor waited too long to get 
possession of those lands necessary to the devel- 
opment of its waterfront, and Liverpool, with a 
population approximately one-ninth that of the 
great metropolis, is now in a position of virtual 
equality in the matter of tonnage handled. If 
the present ratio of development is maintained, 
and London refuses to pay the enormous sums 
necessary to get possession of those lands for her 
shipping, which could have been secured for com- 
paratively little thirty or forty years ago, the new 
aspirant for commercial supremacy of the Brit- 
ish Isles will be in the lead. Yet within the mem- 
ory of men still living, the city on the Mersey 
was surrounded by a low-lying gray waste where 
now are teeming docks and monster ships. 

History is always looking for a return date. 
The imperiling of London's commercial suprem- 
acy can find parallels everywhere in the civilized 
world. 

Very often the beginnings of ports that are des- 
tined to outshine those long established are acci- 
dental; sometimes they are dramatic. An expanse 
of mud flats with a few bluffs in the background 
may be all that meets the eye of the pioneer. 
He knows, and his fellow pioneer knows, that 
through those mud flats there is a channel which 
connects somewhere with the highway of the 
nations. They decide to make of the few houses 
on the bluffs a port, a shipping center, a point 
of communication between the section of the 
country they have selected for their homes and 
the entire world, which communication will en- 
hance the value of every acre within a thousand 
miles. There is unanimity of opinion which car- 
ries the project forward in spite of every natural 
obstacle. The petty jealousies of older communi- 



ties, the objections based on fear that one end of 
the proposed harbor will be enriched and an- 
other end overlooked — in other words, the eco- 
nomic impulse to lying and double-dealing are 
absent. 

Soon the older community a few hundred miles 
distant, with its divided citizenship, its old- 
fashioned methods and its cock-sureness, gets an 
inkling of the conditions. But its very cock-sure- 
ness, its ancient point of view, and its wrangling 
citizenship blind it to the danger. Only an aca- 
demic interest is taken in the possibility of rivalry 
with the newer port. There is no anticipation, 
no preparation, no cognizance of a changed eco- 
nomic condition finding reflex in the aggressive- 
ness and irresistible energy of the pioneers mak- 
ing a place for themselves and their city in the 
affairs of modern life. Vessels compelled to lie 
in the stream waiting for berth room is taken as 
a sign by the residents of the older port that 
the world needs that particular harbor. Never 
once is it permitted to percolate into their con- 
sciousness that the loss entailed in those waits by 
ships will bear an interest of discredit which 
will injure the reputation of the harbor beyond 
repair and affect the prestige of the entire State. 

Delay Helps Competitors. 

Every vessel that is delayed in the older port 
a day is a factor in the growth of the newer rival. 
The newer rival advertises the delay incident to 
trading with the older community, and inciden- 
tally makes much of its own advantages, natural 
and artificial. It speaks of the commodious 
wharves, the rapidity with which ships can be un- 
loaded, and the wonderful richness of its back 
country. The transcontinental railroads race to 
reach that waterfront; they gridiron the entire 
State with branch lines. 

The captains who were compelled to let their 
vessels lie in the stream at the older port for two 
or three days impress upon the owners the ad- 
vertised advantages of the newer port, and the 
younger, more energetic State. Where a saving 
of time or money can be made, no other argu- 
ment is needed with any owner. So, too, the 
shipper who is confronted with delay of twenty- 
four or thirty-six hours in getting his goods to 
market, looks for the shorter, more expeditious 
route. 

With a few modifications, these general condi- 
tions may be applied to the struggle between San 
Francisco and Seattle for supremacy as the gate- 
way to the Far East. Few persons realize what 
the trade between this country and the newly- 
awakened Orient will mean in the next five 
years. Few realize what it means to-day. And 
of these only a small percentage appreciate the 
enormous difficulty involved in keeping Califor- 
nia in the forefront. With the advance of time, 
these difficulties will increase, for still another 
rival is even now all but ready to enter the race. 
This is the new port at Prince Rupert; millions 
of dollars are being spent by the Canadian Gov- 
ernment to fit it for the contest. 

Harbor Needs Facilities. 

San Francisco's chief difficulty lies in its con- 
gested and utterly inadequate harbor. In natural 
requirements it is far superior to either Seattle or 
Prince Rupert. But no harbor, in the modern 
application of that term, that has nothing to rec- 



ommend it but natural resources, is a harbor. 
The fact that large ships lay idle in the stream 
because there were no wharves to accommodate 
them is heralded by our rivals around the world. 
And, to the discredit of the entire State, it must 
be admitted that those ships were kept idle not 
for twenty-four hours or thirty-six hours but for 
five and six weeks at a time. There is no need 
to send the memory far back to verify this. 

With the natural increase of business, leaving 
out of consideration entirely the awakening of 
the Orient, we should double the number of ships 
lying idle in the stream, but we won't. It is hard 
to lure captains, owners and shippers to a port. 
It is doubly hard to lure them there again if they 
have once been put to inconvenience and loss. 
A reputation of lack of wharf room is hard to 
overcome. The fall of the port to second or 
third place is rapid. The fall of the State in 
which the port is located, so far as the mental 
processes of residents in other countries and 
States are concerned, is equally rapid, equally em- 
phatic. Massachusetts and New Jersey combined 
have not the prestige of New York alone. Yet 
the two first have excellent harbors at their chief 
cities. Furthermore, they all started virtually on 
an equal footing. It was only the metropolis of 
the country, however, which kept its wharves up 
to the requirements of its shipping, in fact kept 
its wharves away ahead. There are very few 
recorded instances when a vessel had to lie in the 
East River waiting for a berth. Of like fiber is 
the story of Wisconsin and Illinois. Milwaukee's 
waterfront was superior to the waterfront of 
Chicago, but the latter, with her more energetic 
citizenship, her recognition that every day a ship 
lay in Lake Superior unloaded meant a loss to 
the owners, and consequently a greater loss in 
the way of reputation to Chicago as a port, soon 
remedied that. 

Wharves and piers were built to accommodate 
shipping, it was thought, for ten, twenty years 
ahead. But by one of those twists of fortune, the 
more rapidly the wharves were built, the more the 
shipping developed, until Chicago to-day is not 
only the greatest fresh-water port in the world, 
but the greatest that has ever been in the world. 

Up-to-Date Methods Necessary. 

This phenomenon of shipping keeping pace with 
the facilities for handling it has been so often 
repeated that a law could be formulated that 
would be in its essence scientific. All else be- 
ing equal, it is safe to say that a proportionate in- 
crease of trade follows wharf building in every 
harbor with a responsive back country and an 
open way to the sea. In every large shipping 
point it has been found that wharves built to care 
for the natural increase of traffic for a given time 
have been found inadequate in one-half or one- 
fourth less time. Thus, basing the improvements 
on a ratio of increase for twelve years, Liverpool 
built wharves, and at the end of seven and one- 
half years was again confronted with a congested 
harbor. So the productive unit of New York lias 
been taxed, and is still taxing, the energies of the 
wharf builders to keep up with the shipping, no 
matter how far-sighted the builders may have 
rtioughl themselves when they undertook certain 
increase of facilities. 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A. F. OF L. CONVENTION CALL. 



AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

Headquarters, 423-425 G Street N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

September 19, 1908. 
To All Affiliated Unions, Greeting: 

You are hereby advised that, in pursuance 
to the Constitution ui the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, the Twenty-Eighth Annual 
Convention of the American Federation of 
Labor will be held at Denver, Colorado, 
beginning 10 o'clock .Monday morning, No- 
vember 9, 1908, and will continue in session 
from day to day until the business of the 
convention has been completed. 

Representation. 

Representation in the convention will be 
on the following basis: From National or 
International Unions, for less than 4,000 
members, one delegate; 4,000 or more, two 
delegates; 8,000 or more, three delegates; 
16,000 or more, four delegates; 32,000 or 
more, five delegates; 64,000 or more, six 
delegates; 128,000 or more, seven delegates, 
and so on; and from Central Bodies and 
State Federations, and from local trade- 
unions not having a National or Interna- 
tional Union, and from Federal Labor Un- 
ions, one delegate. 

Organizations to be entitled to representa- 
tion must have obtained a certificate of af- 
filiation (charter) at least one month prior 
to the convention ; and no person will be 
recognized as a delegate who is not a mem- 
ber in good standing of the organization he 
is elected to represent. 

Only bona fide wageworkers, who are not 
members of, or eligible to membership in 
other trade-unions, are eligible as delegates 
from Federal Labor Unions. 

Delegates must be selected at least two 
weeks previous to the convention, and their 
names forwarded to the Secretary of the 
American Federation of Labor immediately 
after their election. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats in the 
convention unless the tax of their organiza- 
tions has been paid in full to September 30, 
1908. 

The importance of our organizations and 
our movement, the duty of the hour and for 
the future, demand that every organization 
entitled to representation shall send its full 
quota of delegates to the Denver conven- 
tion, November 9, 1908. 

Do not allow favoritism to influence you 
in selecting your delegates. Be fully repre- 
sented. 

Be represented by your ablest, best, most 
experienced, and faithful members. 

Credentials. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated unions. The original credentials 
must be given to the delegates-elect and the 
duplicate forwarded to the American Feder- 
ation of Labor office, 423-425 G Street 
Northwest, Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet 
at the headquarters of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor six days previous to the 
opening of the convention, and will report 
immediately upon the opening thereof at 
Denver; hence secretaries will observe the 
necessity of mailing the duplicate creden- 
tials of their respective delegates at the 
earliest possible moment to Washington, 
D. C. 

Grievances. 

Under the law no grievance can be con- 



sidered by the convention that has been de- 
cided by a previous convention, except upon 
the recommendation of the Executive Coun- 
cil, nor will any grievance be considered 
where the parties thereto have not previous- 
ly held conference and attempted to adjust 
the same themselves. 

Railroad Rates. 
The various Passenger Associations have 
been requested to grant a special rate. A 
special rate has been granted which is prac- 
tically on a basis of two cents per mile. Full 
particulars relative to railroad rates will 
be mailed to each delegate as soon as his 
credential is received at American Federa- 
tion of Labor headquarters. 

Hotel Rates. 

Albany Hotel, $1.00 to $3.00 per day, Eu- 
ropean plan. 

Adams Hotel, $1.00 per day, European 
plan. 

Adams Hotel, $3.00 per day, American 
plan. 

Markham Hotel, 75c and $1.00 per day, 
European plan. 

Savoy Hotel, $1.50 to $2.00 per day, Euro- 
pean plan. 

Reservation- in any of the above hotels 
can be made by addressing the chairman of 
the Hotel Committee, R. G. Moser, care of 
Room 315, Appel Building, Denver, Colo. 
The committee is also prepared to make 
reservations in other hotels at rates ranging 
from 75 cents per day up. 

Headquarters of the Executive Council 
will be at the Albany Hotel. 

Delegates should notify chairman of the 
Arrangements Committee, R. G. Moser, care 
of Room 315, Appel Building, Denver, Colo., 
stating time of their contemplated arrival at 
Denver, and over which road they will 
travel. 

If there be any further information re- 
garding the convention, or the arrangements 
for the convenience of the delegates, it will 
be communicated in a later circular, or 
through the American Federationist. 

SAMUEL GOMPERS, 
Attest: President. 

FRANK MORRISON, 
Secretary. 

James Duncan, First Vice-President; 
John Mitchell, Second Vice-President; 
James O'Connell, Third Vice-President ; 
Max Morris, Fourth Vice-President; D. A. 
Hayes, Fifth Vice-President; Daniel J. 
Keefe, Sixth Vice-President; Wm. D. Hu- 
ber, Seventh Vice-President ; Jos. F. Valen- 
tine, Eighth Vice-President ; John B. Len- 
non, Treasurer; Executive Council, Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor. 



Lathe men in the French automobile shops 
are paid on an average of 80 centimes per 
hour. The maximum received by lathe men 
is about 1.20 francs per hour. Payment is 
by piecework, the men at the milling ma- 
chines receive on an average between 80 and 
85 centimes per hour, and the maximum 
does not exceed 1.20 francs. The men at the 
grinders receive on an average 90 centimes 
per hour, and a maximum of 1.20 francs. The 
same statement applies to blacksmiths and 
coppersmiths. The men working at the 
drills, slotters, and planers average about 80 
centimes per hour. The maximum for all 
three tools is 1.20 francs per hour. 



UNEMPLOYED INSURANCE. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



On December 27, 1906, the City Council 
of Strassburg, Germany, adopted rules and 
regulations for the insurance of the unem- 
ployed. The city of Strassburg, in order to 
minimize unemployment as much as pos- 
sible and to have an indirect control of the 
same, has offered to give an extra allowance 
of 50 per cent in addition to that which any 
industrial society in the city contributes to 
its members who are involuntarily unem- 
ployed, provided, of course, the conditions 
laid down in its rules and regulations are 
complied with. 

According to a report of the City Council 
recently published, the introduction of this 
system of insurance has proved to be a suc- 
cess in Strassburg, so much so that no less 
than 50 cities in Germany have written in- 
quiries to the local authorities concerning 
the workings of the system, with a view of 
introducing the same into their respective 
municipalities. 

Twenty different industrial societies, com- 
prising a membership of about 25 per cent 
of the workmen of Strassburg, applied for 
membership within a month after the adop- 
tion of the rules and regulations by the City 
Council. Of these 20 societies 12 received 
the guaranteed support, while the other 8, 
on account of their prosperous condition and 
plenty of work, did not need to take ad- 
vantage of the city's offer. 

The city was called upon to pay 1,900 
marks ($452) in 1907, while industrial so- 
cieties paid 8,000 marks ($1,904) to their 
members for such insurance. The apparent 
inconsistency of the city not paying 4,000 
marks ($952) — 50 per cent of the sum paid 
out by the societies — is explained by the fact 
that all the idle workmen who received sup- 
port from their respective societies did not 
comply in all particulars with the city's 
rules and regulations, hence were not en- 
titled to the extra allowance, the two chief 
reasons being a residence of less than a 
year in the city and the failure of the work- 
men to report regularly at the city employ- 
men bureau. 

This insurance system does not reach all 
the laborers, in particular the unskilled 
classes who belong to no industrial societies. 
It is true that less than 25 per cent of the 
laborers at the beginning of this year came 
under the provision of the city's allowance 
guaranty, but the director of the local em- 
ployment bureau says that the percentage of 
workmen belonging to industrial societies 
has increased since the city introduced this 
system and that the percentage will un- 
doubtedly continue to increase and that 
these insurance rules and regulations will 
encourage the organization of industrial so- 
cieties whose aim is to increase proficiency 
in their respective trades and educate their 
members generally, and eventually the great 
majority of laborers, so far as unemploy- 
ment is concerned, will be under the control 
of the city through these societies. 



The decline in the Dominion's shipping 
tonnage, which has been in progress for 
thirty years, has now been apparently ar- 
rested. Although 452 vessels were stricken 
from the registry list in 1907, there was a 
net gain; 392 new vessels, valued at $1,728,- 
450, were built and others bought from 
abroad. The total value of Canadian ves- 
sels last year was $20,960,640. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




VERONA IN A STORM. 



After passing through the center of the 
tropical hurricane, which wrought such 
havoc to shipping in West India waters, the 
Norwegian fruit steamer Verona, in com- 
mand of Captain Einar Oxholm, limped into 
Boston recently. Traces of the storm's fury 
were not lacking, for some of her deck 
fittings were missing, and there were other 
evidences of her terrible battle with the ele- 
ments. 

Officers and men had not fully recovered 
from the effects of the exhausting work to 
keep the vessel free. At one time there were 
three feet of water in the stokehole, and the 
men were working in water knee deep while 
they bailed with buckets to prevent the fires 
from being extinguished. That the fruiter 
won the fight against the storm is considered 
remarkable. 

The pages of the vessel's log-book tell the 
story of her terrible experience. According 
to this record the Verona, laden with 21,972 
bunches of bananas, left Port Morant, 
Jamaica, at 7:30 p. m. September 11. At 
the outset she had proceeded only a short 
distance when the officers saw unmistakable 
signs of the approaching tempest. 

On reaching Castle Island at 1 :20 a. m. of 
the 13th, a heavy gale was blowing and the 
steamer began to ship water in such quan- 
tities that all the hatches were battened 
down tight. 

Then the wind whipped into south-south- 
east and the rain came down in torrents. 
The captain was able to just see Castle 
Island light and he got his bearings from 
there and saved the vessel from driving 
ashore. During the night of the 12th the 
fruiter worked through Crooked Island pas- 
sage, but at 8 o'clock the next morning the 
gale had developed into a hurricane and the 
seas were so terrible that Captain Oxholm 
had to heave the vessel to. She was pitch- 
ing and rolling terribly and the seas were 
breaking on board in masses of seething 
foam. 

In an effort to calm the turbulent seas 
gallons of oil were poured from the oil tanks 
forward, but with little or no effect. All 
the while the fury of the storm was increas- 
ing until at 2 p. m. that day it had reached 
a velocity of fully 100 miles an hour. The 
steamer was heading east by south and the 
seas were dashing all over her. The deck 
spaces were filled and the water ran through 
the alleyways and poured into the stokehole. 
A bucket brigade was formed and the men 
worked for hours bailing out the water. The 
engines were going all the while, but it was 
feared that an attempt to pump out the 
water by steam would clog the pipes with 
coal dust and render them useless. In this 
emergency the buckets were resorted to. 

For fourteen hours the Verona lay to with 
the terrible storm whirling about her and 
the seas almost throwing her on her beam 
ends. The barometer dropped steadily un- 
til it reached the lowest point her officers 
had ever seen recorded. That was when the 
center of the disturbance struck the craft. 
The wind was so strong that not a human 
being could stand on deck and they kept 
within shelter as much as possible. One of 
the benches was broken and the gangway 



from the lower deck to the lower bridge was 
demolished. The canvas awning was torn 
to shreds and some slight damage done to 
the deck fittings. 

The night of the 13th the wind changed 
to south-southwest and at 7 p. m. the en- 
gines were started and the vessel ran before 
the storm in a north-northeast direction. It 
required all the skill of the captain to keep 
her from getting broadside to the wind, 
which might have proven disastrous. 

Then the seas began to roll over the stern. 
They flung the vessel about like a chip and 
dashed high into the rigging. Two life 
buoys were ripped from the after rails and 
swept away. At that time a pyramidal sea 
would tower above the fruiter and then 
crash down on the iron deck with a deafen- 
ing sound. It was impossible to hear the 
orders of the officers above the din of the 
storm. 

The storm continued on the 14th, with 
the seas worse than ever. It was the 
15th before the storm showed the least 
sign of moderating. Then the hatches were 
partly opened to ventilate the fruit and 
awnings were stretched above them to keep 
the spray from getting to the fruit. Con- 
siderable water went into the 'tween decks 
section through the ventilators, and this had 
to be bailed out with buckets the same as 
the stokehole. 



CRIMP HELD FOR TRIAL. 



SAVES WIFE BY DIVING. 



The 30-ton schooner Louisa B. Robinson, 
of Greenport, N. Y., sailing from that port, 
light, for Bridgeport, was struck by a sud- 
den squall off Faulkners Island on Septem- 
ber 19 and capsized. 

Mrs. Edward Seaman, wife of the schoon- 
er's captain, was imprisoned in the cabin 
and was saved from drowning by her hus- 
band, who dived down and brought her to 
the surface. 

Captain and Mrs. Seaman clung to the 
side of the schooner for several hours until 
taken off by the schooner Mary Cuff, in 
command of Captain Garrett S. Dunbar, of 
New Haven, to whose home they were 
taken. 



HAS CREW OF MATHESON. 



The Clyde liner Seminole, from New York 
September 15, rescued the crew of the aban- 
doned schooner John A. Matheson, from 
Baltimore, 174 miles north of Turks Island. 

The Matheson had a severe experience in 
the hurricane that has prevailed in these 
waters. She was dismasted, and, becoming 
waterlogged, was abandoned by the crew on 
the 15th. The boats kept well together, al- 
though the sea was running high, and the 
Seminole was able to pick up all hands. 

Early on the 19th the Seminole passed a 
bark on fire in latitude 26.30 north, longitude 
71.30 west. The vessel apparently was Nor- 
wegian, although the name could not be 
made out. There was no sign of life aboard. 



Ingvald Ronning recently died in the hos- 
pital in New York and was buried by the 
Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union. 



One of the most important questions in 
the history of the court came up for con- 
sideration before United States Commis- 
sioner Chiapella at New Orleans, La., re- 
cently. The legal determination of what 
constitutes a seaman was the issue involved, 
and Judge Chiapella decided to let the high- 
er court pass upon the question. 

Hans Larsen appeared for commitment 
trial on the charge of holding the clothes of 
a seaman. Larsen keeps a sailors' boarding- 
house and C. F. Hoglung claimed that his 
wearing apparel had been seized by the pro- 
prietor. The Federal statutes provide that 
no attachment shall issue or no seizure be 
made of a seaman's clothing. 

It developed at the trial that Hoglung was 
not actually employed at the time of the 
seizure, and the point arose as to whether it 
was necessary for a sailor, so employed in 
the past, to have signed shipping articles be- 
fore he could invoke the statute as to attach- 
ment of his property. 

The Commissioner decided that Hoglund 
was a seaman, whether actually employed 
or not, and committed Larsen to the higher 
court for trial under a nominal bond, pend- 
ing the final settlement of this question. 

In addition to this point of law, it ap- 
peared that the question of unionism and 
non-unionism entered largely into the prose- 
cution, which fact prompted Commissioner 
Chiapella to declare that his court could not 
be made the place for the settlement of such 
differences and that if any dissensions ex- 
isted they were apart from the trial of the 
case at issue. It is alleged that the recent 
prosecutions in the Commissioner's court as 
to accepting remuneration for securing em- 
ployment of sailors and the charge against 
Larsen grows out of certain controversies 
between the union and non-union sailors. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



In order to handle increased business the 
Metropolitan line has decided to place its 
steamers H. F. Dimock on the line between 
Boston and New York, with the James S. 
Whitney, giving a three-trip-a-week sched- 
ule. Together with the nightly sailings of 
the Harvard and Yale the line will now have 
ten sailings a week from either end. 



After being inspected and admired by 
thousands of Bostonians and marine ex- 
perts and would-be voyagers, the handsome 
new United Fruit Company steamer Ile- 
redia recently sailed for Colon, Panama and 
Costa Rica. The steamer will engage in 
the service between Colon, Port Limon and 
New Orleans. On her passage to the tropics 
she will call at Norfolk for bunker coal. 



After having been out of commission for 
some time the Boston Towboat Company's 
steamer Hyades is again in service on a new 
line between Honolulu and Puget Sound. 
The first sailing will be made on December 
14, and trips will be made monthly until 
business warrants more frequent voyages. 
The line opens a new market for Pacific 
products and a new channel for importa- 
tions. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The Sydney (Australia) Labol 
Council lias wisely decided not to have 
anything to do with sectional union 
ism in the future. 

Australian Federal Minister fur Cus- 
toms Chapman has announced in Mel- 
bourne that white labor in the 
fields of Queensland is a splendid sue 
cess. 

A correspondent writes that men arc 
employed ai the Mulgrave ( Australia) 
sugar mill llj^ hours per day, at the 
weekly rate of 22s. 6d. This pan- out 
at about 4d. an hour. 

Warwick (Australia) shopkeepers 
are opposing the reasonable re< 
of hard-worked shop assistants, that 
the weekly half-holiday be changed 
from Wednesday to Saturday. 

At a recent meeting of the Sydney 
(Australia) Labor Council, the Presi- 
dent, Mr. P. Marshall, indicated the 
formation of a separate party to di- 
rectly represent unionists in Parlia- 
ment. 

A German scheme of social legisla- 
tion gives all workers a right to pecu- 
niary aid when unfitted for work 
through sickness or accident. It is 
done by insurance, and made compul- 
sory. 

The Japanese immigrants who 
were sent to the State of Sao Paulo, 
Brazil, by the Imperial Emigration 
Company of Tokio are leaving that 
section in large numbers. They have 
been at work on the coffee planta- 
tions, but apparently were not satis- 
fied with the employment. 

Three music hall singers in Paris. 
France, have won suits for damages 
against Secretary Pataud, of the 
Electrical Workers' Union, for loss 
of work due to a two hours' stril 
the union on the night of August 6. 
Secretary Pataud was ordered to pay 
eight francs to each of the plain- 
tiffs. 

At the annual conference of the 
New Zealand Trades Council dele- 
gates discussed the position of labor 
in regard to the liquor traffic. The 
majority of the members said the time 
had arrived for labor to take up a 
definite stand on this question, par- 
ticularly as the Licensed Victuallers' 
Association was opposing the claims 
of the unions. 

The total number of cases of poi- 
soning and of anthrax reported to the 
British Home Office during July was 
83, consisting of 71 cases of lead poi- 
soning, 4 of mercurial poisoning, 4 of 
arsenic poisoning, and 4 of anthrax. 
In addition to the above, 19 cases of 
lead poisoning (4 of which were fatal) 
were reported during July among 
house painters and plumbers. 

The strike situation at Rio de Ja- 
neiro assumed a graver aspect on 
September 21 when the carters and 
drivers declared a general strike. 
Work on the docks has been retarded 
greatly, but the dock employes con- 
tinue to load the ships with coffee. 
Transportation of goods from the 
dock stores to the docks is entirely 
suspended. 

The changes in hours of British 
labor taking effect in July affected 196 
workpeople, whose aggregate working 
time was reduced by 497 hours per 
week. The total number of work- 
people reported as affected by 
changes in hours of labor in the seven 
months ended July 31 was 11,183. Of 
these 490 had their aggregate working 
time increased by 117 hours per week, 
and 10,693 had reductions amount- 
ing to 16,957 hours per week. 



Cannon's Clothing" Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LIPPMAN 


BROS. 


532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernest 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Union Goods for Union 


Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
1 carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
bavlng been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 



*^Qlsf&^ 



JOHN A. MOFFITT. President, Orange, N. J. 
V1ARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




S! 




San Pedro Letter List. 



Absolonsen, < He M. Johnson, G. 
Agostino, Fallettl -1399 

Althouse, Gustaf Jurgensen, H. 
Andersen, Emll Karadsa, Gus. 

Andersen, Fred. J. Kelsen, Carls 
Andersen, Tom -538 Kesse, Teodor. 
Anderson, Chas. Kirst, Hans 

Anderson, Edwart Klaesson, Kar 
Anderson, Axel P. package. 
Anderson, Oscar Klausen, Karl 
Anderson, J. Klein, J. -378 

Andersson, Anders Kristensen, W 



W. 



Kuhl, Herman 
Lalne, A. 
Lane, Casper 
Lange, Friderik 
Larsen, Magie 
Larsen, F. -1113 
Larsen, C. U -1202 
I. ■wis. T. M. 
Lieberman, -1157 
Liebermann, George 

-1157 
Lindall, George 
Lindgren, A. -870 
Li nd holm, A. 
Linnian, A. W. 
Logothetis, Fana- 

gotis 
Lonneeke, Aug. -1.1-1 
Luman, Alku 
Lund, W. -1341 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 



LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

I. os Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT. 

SAN PEURO, CAL. 



C. L. M U N S O N 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, san pedro, cal. 



When making purchases from our ad- 
vertisers, always mention the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Terkel Olsen, a native of Treungen, 
Norway, aged 56, is inquired for by 
his brother. Address Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

llalvor Eugcn Krogstad, a native 
Christiania, Norway, is inquired for 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, No. 1568, 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is in- 
quired for by his parents. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Bourgevis is inquired for by 
Ed. M. Bourgevis, who has news 
which will require his atention. Ad- 
dress, 3104 West 99th street, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Port- 
land, Or. 

Nils Nilson, a native of Stavanger, 
Norway, last heard of at Buffalo, N. 
Y., four years ago, is inquired for 
by his parents. Address, Nils Nilson, 
Nedre Bloosenborg, No. 9, Stavan- 
ger, Norway. 

Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native 
of Kalmar, Sweden, born September 
15, 1881, supposed to be sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by 
his sisters and parents. Address, 
Klaes Swensson, Sodra Langgatan 
No. 26, Kalmar, Sweden. 

The following seamen, members of 
the crew of the schooner Minnie E. 
Caine, at the time of her wreck in 
1902, are requested to report to the 
Secretary of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific: Wm. McLaughlin, Julius 
Franz, K. Grunert, J. Koglund, W. 
Wickstrom, C. Christensen. 



II. 
Arnesen, Karl A. 
Axelsson, C. B. 
Backus, C. 
Bade, Alexander 
Baily, Joe 
Barnhill, J. F. 
Barracb., Herman 
Bauchwitz, Fritz 
Bauer, Gosta 
Behrens, G. 
Behrain, J. 
Benard. Sandallo 
Berggren, John 
Bi rgh, Borge 
Berntsen, Ole 
Bernhardren, C. 
Bitter, Herman 
Bogdon, Wilhelm 
Bolander, J. E. 

k. Charles E. Lundstedt, Cli. 
, R. Maack, Hans 

Brown, Joe Madson, James 

Brusbard, Ewalt Maki, Ivar 

Bush, P. Manley, Charlie 

Cappello, H. Martin, John B. 

Caratza, ConstantlnMattson, n. J. 

A. McFarland, Dugald 

Carlson, August McKenzie, James 

on, August Mikkelson, C. 

Celley, Edward Murray, Joseph 

Christensen, Christ Nestor, W. C. 
Christensen, W. 1179Nielsen, M. P. 
Chrstensen, J. -1164Nielsen, W. -1000 
Christensen, Harry Nielsen, Gustave 
Christensen, Gus, Nilsson, Johan 

-1054 
Christiansen, -901 
Colombay, Louis 
Dalesten, -1156 
Ebapanen, W. 
Ehnke, W. 
Ekeland, Sigurd 
Engebretsen, Mar-Norkamp, Richard 

kus Norman, L. 

Ericsson, August Olsen, C 



Nllsen, ii. 
Nilsen, Carl P. -143 
Nilson, U. -877 
Nisson, Louis 
Nodeland, George E. 
Nordblom, Ben 
Nordin. M. 



571 

ICi-h-ksson, C. E. 
Eskbom, Ai-vid 
l-'alk. P. J. 

Fettis, P. L. 
Fjeldstad, John 
Ki viand, C. J. 
Geisler, Hans 



Olsen, W. -753 
Orten, Sigurd 
Ostlin. Frank 
Pagel, Erwln 
Pautanido, S., rg. let 
Petersen, W. -1284 
Peterson, Nicolous 
Pettersen. Alfred 



Goumas, C, r'g. let.Rau, R. K 
Grantley. W. G. Reek, John 

(Package) Robeson, Michael 

Greveit, Joe Robinson, Alen 

Gustafson, A. K. -600Robsham. Jens W. 
Guthree, Raymond Rodrlquez. Manuel 
Hammond, J. A. Rosan, Oscar 
ilansberg, J. B. Sardis, Vassllas 

Hansen, Alfred -1732 Savonlus. B. 
Hansen, Haakon Scarabosio, Mario 
Hansen. Laurits A.Schlosher, Ludwig 
Hanson, Frank Schwartz, F. -1259 

on, Jacob Sebeline. C. 

In, A. E. Selln, Gustav F. 

He'dman, John N. Sillin, George 
Hickman, Fred Skand, C. Johansen 



Hilke, Carl 
Holmen, George 
Holmgren, Joel 
lngbretsen, -068 
Ipsen, Edward S. 



Smith, J. S. 
Sorin, Kristlan 
Steen, Emil 
Steen, I. -1999 
Steen, Ed 



Jacobson, John -1341Svedstrup, E. 
.lamiesen. J. Svensson, Nikolans 

Jai -mi, Chas. Swanson, G. 

Janson, F. -1911 Sylvian, Le Bloa 

D R. -1754 Thompson, Frederick 

Jensen, J. H. -1311 Thoren, Gust 
Johannsen, Chris- Tuomlnen, Alfred 

tian Uggla. Alfred 

Johansen, C, -1593 Ulke, E. 
Johansen, Hans Wahlstedt, Rafael 

Johansson, Johan 880Wlckstrand. J. 
John, Robert Wlksten. Arvid 

Johndahl. Harry Wills. George 
Johnson. A. -1451 Woker, H. 
Jonasson, C. A. Young, Charles 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Simpson, better known as 
Jack Simpson, age 32, who has sailed 
out of New York on the Portland 
Line, is inquired for by his relatives, 
Mr. J. Childs, 208 McDougall street, 
Biooklyn, N. Y., or communicate with 
the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's 
Union, 15 Union street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 









COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







The passengers and crew of the British steamer 
Aeon, which was wrecked on Christmas Island, 
July 18, arrived at Suva, Fiji Islands, on Septem- 
ber 30, on the steamer Manuka. 

The San Francisco Board of Education has de- 
cided to establish a class in navigation and sea- 
manship in the Humboldt Evening School. The 
class will be opened on November 1, under the 
charge of John T. McMillan. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 1: Steamer Restless, John Olsson, vice 
O. L. Thomsen; steamer Reliance, Oscar L. 
Thomsen, vice John G. Trapp. 

A break in the pipe of the Union Oil Company 
at East San Pedro, Cal., on September 26, re- 
sulted in flooding the inner bay with oil, doing 
considerable damage to yachts and vessels at 
anchor in the harbor. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the 
Custom-house on September 28: Steamer May- 
fair, A. Olson master; schooner Henry Wilson, F. 
Sanders master. The steamer Stanley Dollar was 
registered with Milton Thwing as master. 

The owners of the Fulton Iron Works, of San 
Francisco, have decided to wind up the affairs of 
that concern and go out of business, after an 
existence of fifty years. The concern is solvent, 
but has not been making money of late. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the 
San Francisco Custom-house on September 30: 
Schooner Henry Wilson, F. Sanders master; 
steamer Samoa, M. J. Madsen master; barkentine 
J. M. Griffith, F. T. Sanders master. 

Fourteen commercial bodies of San Francisco 
have petitioned the Navy Department for the 
creation of a commission to study the harbor of 
San Francisco with a view to the establishment 
of facilities making that port a strong naval base. 
Two barks bound for Iquique were placed on 
the overdue list on September 30. The bark 
Arracan, 135 days out from Port Talbot, is quoted 
for reinsurance at 10 per cent, and the bark Holt 
Hill, 124 days from Cardiff, is quoted at 10 per 
cent. 

Several vessels of the United States Pacific 
fleet, including the cruiser Tennessee, the flag- 
ship of the second division, in command of Rear- 
Admiral Sebree, and the Washington, the Whipple 
and the Hopkins, arrived at Apia, Samoa, on 
September 21. 

A dispatch received at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 26 states that the barkentine Joseph L. 
Eviston has arrived at Singapore badly damaged. 
The Joseph L. Eviston left Cocos on July 5 for 
Mauritius, Newcastle, and Honolulu, and was 
previously reported disabled at Cocos Island. 

A dispatch from Melbourne, Australia, reports 
that the Chinese crew of the British steamer 
Aeon, wrecked on Christmas Island, mutinied 
and looted the wreck. It was necessary to main- 
tain an armed guard over the Chinese for the 
protection of the women passengers on the Aeon. 
The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 28: Steamer Resolute, George H. 
Wellington, vice John Richardson; schooner 
Magnolia, W. J. Ward, vice Henry Woldt; 
steamer Arizonan, C. M. Nichols, vice J. F. 
Nichols. 

The two-masted schooner Sophia Johnson ar- 
rived at Seattle, Wash., on September 30 from 
the Arctic coast of Siberia with a cargo of oil, 
skins, ivory and native paraphernalia valued at 
over $100,000. This is for the exhibition at the 
native village in the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Fair 
next year. 

Investigation was begun at San Francisco on 
October 2 into the charges of cowardice made 
against F. Farrar and P. Hamilton, of the can- 
nery tugs Hattie Gage and Kayak, by Captain 
Wagner, of the wrecked ship Star of Bengal. 
The latter claims that had the tugs stood by 
when the ship went ashore all hands might have 
been saved. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 26: Steamer Leader, M. Homburg, 
vice N. J. Richardson; steamer Jolande, G. Schip- 
pacasse, vice M. S. McGovern; schooner H. C. 
Wright, V. B. Nielsen, vice Peter Bosch; steam- 
er Roanoke, L. Black, vice R. J. Dunham, re- 
ported from Portland, Or. 

Four more vessels were placed on the overdue 
list at San Francisco on October 1, as follows: 
Bark Criccieth Castle, 128 days out from Barry 
to Mejillones; ship Leicester Castle, 143 days out 
from Cardiff to Pisagua; bark Waterloo, 154 days 
out from Shields to Callao; bark Mozambique, 
145 days from Barry to Callao. On each of the 
vessels the rate is 10 per cent. 

At a trial trip of the Canadian Pacific twin- 
screw passensrer steamer Princess Charlo.tc, built 
by the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering 
Company of Govan, Scotland, for service between 
Victoria and Seattle, alternating with the Princess 
Victoria, held on October 1 on the Clyde, a mean 
speed of twenty knots an hour was easily at- 
tained with a good margin on six hours' run. 

The steamer Humboldt, which went ashore on 
the northern coast several days ago, has at last 
been floated. News wai. received at San Fran- 



cisco on October 1 that the work, which has 
been carried on since the accident occurred, has 
proved successful. In tow of a tug the Humboldt 
has been taken to Esquimalt, B. C, where she 
will be given a thorough overhauling and repair- 
ing. 

After being out 140 days from New Caledonia 
to Glasgow and being posted in the overdue list, 
the bark La Blanche arrived safely at her des- 
tination on October 1. Considerable anxiety had 
been felt for La Blanche, and there was a per- 
centage of 15 per cent on her. Rough weather is 
supposed to have been the cause of her delay in 
reaching port, although no damage to the vessel 
was reported. 

Two vessels bound for San Francisco were 
placed on the overdue list on October 2 and 
quoted for reinsurance at 10 per cent. They are 
the ship Acamas, out 161 days from Rotterdam, 
and the bark Grande Duchesse Olga, out 95 days 
from Newcastle, N. S. W. The ship Jupiter, 169 
days from Liverpool for Puget Sound, was also 
posted as overdue on the 2d and quoted for re- 
insurance at the same rate as the others. 

The Alaskan cannery ship Star of Bengal was 
wrecked at Helm Point, Coronation Island, on 
September 20, by drifting ashore from her anchor- 
age during a heavy gale. Inclusive of crew and 
cannery hands, the Star of Bengal had on board 
137 men, of whom 111 were drowned, among the 
latter being 15 whites, 76 Chinese and 20 Japa- 
nese. The vessel was valued at $75,000, and was 
uninsured. The cargo of 54,000 cases of salmon 
was insured. 

Chief Justice Clabaugh, of Washington, D. C, 
has ordered Eugene Tyler Chamberlain, Com- 
missioner of Navigation, to show cause on Octo- 
ber 9 why a writ of mandamus should not issue 
to compel the refunding of $1,695 collected for 
taxes from the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. 
The complainant alleges unlawful assessment for 
taxes and tonnage on the steamship Montana on 
July 17, 1906, by the Collector at Port Town- 
send, Wash. 

According to advices received at Victoria, B. 
C, the Toyo Kisen Kaisha is arranging to place 
a line of steamers between Japanese ports and 
Salina Cruz, to take advantage of the connection 
with the Atlantic and European markets by way 
of the Tehuantepec Railway, and the Nippon 
Yusen Kaisha is arranging to invade the Mediter- 
ranean with a Japanese steamship line running 
between Port Said and Trieste or Fiume in 
Austro-Hungary. 

Eighteen survivors of the ship Star of Bengal, 
wrecked on Coronation Island on the Alaskan 
coast, arrived at Seattle, Wash., on September 
26 on the steamship Humboldt. Sixteen of 
them are white men, as follows: Captain Nich- 
olas Wagner, Victor Johnson, Gus Johnson, Alf 
Olson, Frank Muir, George Johnson, Hans 
Frederickson, Olaf Hansen, Andrew Olson, An- 
drew Anderson, Thoral Anderson, David Wilson, 
Harry Lewald, Fred Matson, Lars Kaup and Ed 
Anderson. The other two are Chinese. 

Off on their voyage of 16,000 miles to the Pa- 
cific by way of the Straits of Magellan, six baby 
lighthouse craft, none bigger than the average 
two-master schooner that navigates the Hudson, 
sailed from Tompkinsville, New York, on Sep- 
tember 21. The tiny vessels, which are on their 
maiden trip, will follow the course that Rear 
Admiral Evans took in conducting the battle- 
ship fleet to California, except that in going- 
through the Straits of Magellan they will follow 
the lateral channels used by the torpedo destroy- 
ers. All will make the cruise under their own 
steam. Included in the crews of 170 seamen and 
officers are eight graduates of the schoolship 
Newport, which arrived September 21 from a 
cruise. The schoolship boys are taken along as 
signal officers. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on October 2: Ship Toxteth, 215 
days from Port Talbot, 90 per cent; bark Alice, 
133 days from New Caledonia for Rotterdam, 15 
per cent; ship Verbena, 179 days from Portland 
for Queenstown, 8 per cent; bark Arracan, 137 
days from Port Talbot for Iquique, 15 per cent; 
bark Holt Hill, 126 days from Cardiff for Iquique, 
10 per cent; bark Criccieth Castle, 129 days from 
Barry for Mejillones, 10 per cent; ship Leicester 
Castle, 144 days from Cardiff for Pisagua, 10 per 
cent; bark Waterloo, 155 days from Shields for 
Callao, 10 per cent; bark Mozambique, 146 days 
from Barry for Callao, 10 per cent; ship Jupiter, 
169 days from Liverpool for Puget Sound, 10 per 
cent; ship Acamas, 161 days from Rotterdam for 
San Francisco, 10 per cent; bark Grande Duchesse 
Olga, 95 days from Newcastle, N. S. W., for San 
Francisco, 10 per cent. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 

For good beds and clean rooms, go to "THE 
HARRISON," 456 Harrison street, corner of 
First, San Francisco. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, Ala., G6 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 125 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 



WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont, Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont, Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 222 State St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
\ SI I TABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, III.. 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 

J O U R N A L 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 
THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACAKTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN' ADVANCE. 

One jrear, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents shouM ad- 
dress ill communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors - Union of the P 
14-46 East Street, Ban Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 

of the paper, and i mpanied by the writer's name 

and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1908. 
THE SEAMEN'S CONVENTION. 



International Seamen's Union of 
America, 
Boston, Mass., September 28, 1908. 
To the Officers and Members of Affiliated 
Unions : 

Comrades — In pursuance of the Constitution 
of the International Seamen's Union of Amer- 
ica, you are hereby notified that the thirteenth 
annual convention will convene in the port of 
New Orleans, La., on November 30, 1908, at 
10 a. m. 

1 wish to draw your attention to the follow- 
ing Constitutional provisions : 

"Delegates shall have the same qualifications 
as the elective officers of the organization rep- 
resented, and shall be elected by a general vote 
of each organization. * * * In case a va- 
cancy in the regularly elected delegation oc- 
curs between the election of delegates and the 
convention, the various organizations shall 
have the power to fill such vacancies." — Art. 
111. Sec. 4. 

"Representation at the convention shall be 
based upon the average per capita tax paid 
during the year. Organizations shall be enti- 
tled to one delegate for 200 members or more, 
three delegates for 500 or more, and one dele- 
gate for each additional 500 or majority frac- 
tion thereof."— Art. Ill, Sec. 2. 

"That voting be done, giving to each dele- 
gate one vote for 100 members or majority 
fraction thereof." — Art. Ill, Sec. 3. 

"Affiliated organizations shall at least send 
one delegate to the convention, and shall de- 
fray the expenses of such delegates as they 
send. "—Art. Ill, Sec. 8. 

"No one shall be qualified to hold office in 
the International Seamen's Union, or to act as 
a delegate to the convention, if he holds a po- 
litical office, whether appointive or elective." 
—Art. V, Sec. 3. 

"Affiliated organizations in arrears for more 
than one quarter may be suspended." — Art. 
IX. Sec. 3. 

The fiscal year ends on October 30, 1908, 
and I hope that all organizations will find it 
convenient to pay up all arrears before that 
date. 

It is also to be hoped that, inasmuch as this 



will undoubtedly be a very important conven- 
tion, all affiliated organizations will endeavor 
to send as many delegates as possible, and 
their very best members, as I am of the opin- 
ion that the future usefulness of the Interna- 
tional will depend much upon the actions of 
this convention. Therefore it is to be hoped 
that we will be able to get the very best talent 
from all organizations. 

The arrangements for hotel accommodations 
will be made by Nice- 1 'resident 1 iodine, who 
will notify you in time as to the arrangements. 
Fraternally yours, 

W'm. H. Frazier, 
Secretary-Treasurer, I. S. U. of A. 

The fact that the Seamen's convention of 
1908 will meet in the Gulf District is sufficient 
to give added interest to that gathering and 
tn justify an increased effort by the respective 
locals to insure the largest possible represen- 
tation by their most capable members. It is 
many years since the Seamen's convention has 
been held in the Gulf District, a circumstance 
due to the more pressing claims of other Dis- 
tricts, rather than to any lack of interest in 
conditions on the Gulf. Indeed, each conven- 
tion has given a good deal of thought to the 
ta-k of organizing the seamen in that locality. 
If the results have not been as good as was 
hoped for, the failure in this respect must be 
attributed to the difficulty of the situation, not 
to any lack of good intentions or honest 
efforts. 

This year the Seamen's interest in the Gulf 
will be demonstrated by the presence of their 
representatives in person. The opportunity 
thus afforded for the acquirement of first-hand 
information will doubtless prove valuable, as 
affording a basis for the inauguration of meas- 
ures that will prove good in practice as well 
as in theory. Reports from the Gulf District 
during the past year indicate that a great deal 
of active work has already been done in that 
locality by the agents and members of the re- 
spective local unions of Seamen, Firemen and 
Cooks and Stewards. The coming convention 
should, as it doubtless will, give an impetus to 
the work of thoroughly organizing the Gulf 
seamen, sufficient to carry it to a successful 
conclusion. The hour is ripe and the field is 
fallow. 

The interests of the seafaring craft through- 
out the entire jurisdiction of the International 
Seamen's Union of America demand the most 
earnest and intelligent consideration. The 
statement of Secretary-Treasurer Frazier, in 
the convention call, that "the future usefulness 
of the International will depend much upon 
the actions of this convention," is more than 
ordinarily significant. Of course, such a state- 
ment is always in order upon such occasions ; 
in the present instance that statement is not 
only strictly in order but absolutely undebata- 
ble. The conditions of the present and the 
prospects of the future demand that each af- 
filiated union be represented at the coming 
convention by a full quota of the best men 
available for the duty of marking off next 
year's course. 



SHIPOWNERS OPPOSE BONDS. 



The Sailors' Union of the Pacific is repre- 
sented at the convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor by Comrades Paul 
Scharrenberg, August Seaman and John W. 
Krickson. The labor movement of the State 
may rest assured that the large influence 
wielded by the Sailors in the convention will 
be used to the best advantage of trade-union- 
ism and the principles upon which that insti- 
tution is founded. 



The statement issued in favor of the pro- 
posed bond issue for the purchase of land to 
increase the dockage facilities of San Fran- 
cisco (see page 1 of this issue), although in- 
dorsed by a large number of organizations, has 
not met with unanimous approval. Opposition 
to the plan is expressed in at least one quar- 
ter, and that a quarter which is entitled to re- 
spect by reason of its direct interest in the 
question. The Shipowners' Association has 
gone on record, in the following language: 

Whereas, If the wharf facilities and piers com- 
mencing at Van Ness avenue and continuing south 
to Central Basin in the Mission, which constitute 
the present water front of San Francisco and over 
a small part of which the business of to-day is 
now being done, are completed as promised in 
the report of the engineers of the Federated Har- 
bor Improvement Associations, this Association 
is confident that sufficient dockage to accommo- 
date its increased commerce for fifty years or 
will be had; 

Resolved, That this Association strongly urges 
and advocates the adoption of Senate Constitu- 
tional Amendment No. 29, which provides for the 
issuance of bonds for a term of seventy-five years 
with sinking fund commencing on the nineteenth 
year after date of issue, which will enable the 
State to acquire Islais Creek Basin without re- 
tarding contemplated improvements on San Fran 
Cisco's present water front, and which will spread 
the burden of cost over such a period of time 
that no hardship will be inflicted upon any one 
class or generation; 

Resolved, That the Shipowners' Association of 
the Pacific Coast earnestly urge the defeat of the 
"India Basin Act," which is to be voted upon at 
the November election; 

The point made by the Shipowners, that the 
present dockage facilities, if improved to the 
fullest extent, will suffice for the needs of the 
harbor during the next fifty years, may be a 
good one, but it does not lessen the force of 
the argument that the State should acquire all 
possible dockage facilities while that may be 
done at a moderate outlay. With all due re- 
spect to the Shipowners' Association, as a 
body of practical men, we do not think it safe 
to estimate the growth of San Francisco dur- 
ing the next fifty years upon the basis of the 
last fifty years' growth. Very liberal allow- 
ance must be made for coming events, the 
shadows of which are already cast before us. 
We think it highly probable that the next half- 
century will witness a growth in the commerce 
of the port far in excess of that recorded in a 
like period in the history of San Francisco or 
of any other seaport in the world. No step 
should be neglected to meet such contingency, 
even though it be regarded as more or less 
remote or doubtful. 



The ninth annual convention of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor, now in ses- 
sion at San Jose, Cal., is one of the largest 
gatherings ever held by that body. Consider- 
ing the industrial depression, the large attend- 
ance is significant of the great interest of the 
labor movement in the problems now confront- 
ing it. The convention will pass upon a num- 
ber of measures to be introduced at the com- 
ing session of the Legislature, prominent 
among these being bills to regulate employ- 
ment agencies ; to provide for the prompt pay- 
ment of wages in cash ; to increase the effi- 
ciency of the Bureau of Labor Statistics; to 
repeal the State law against harboring desert- 
ing seamen ; to limit the hours of street-car- 
men, and to establish the Initiative, Referen- 
dum, Recall, and Direct Primary. The con- 
vention will probably express itself on the 
policy of the American Federation of Labor 
in the political campaign. The Journal ex- 
tends congratulations to the convention and 
wishes it well in its work for the advance- 
ment of the cause of labor in California. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



HARBOR OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



How precious this natural increase of trade is 
considered may be gathered from the fact that 
there is a movement on foot to increase the 
harbor facilities of New York by building enor- 
mous docks at Manatauk Point. The cost of this 
one improvement alone is estimated at thirty 
millions of dollars. The lessening of the time 
between this country and Europe is placed at six 
hours, a saving that justifies the great expendi- 
ture. 

The proposed harnessing of the Mississippi is 
nothing more than a gigantic movement to bring 
sea-going vessels to St. Louis and intermediate 
points. The Government engineers estimate that 
it will take two hundred millions of dollars to 
secure a fourteen-foot channel to Missouri's chief 
city. 

The estimated cost of the improvements already 
under way and proposed at Seattle and Prince 
Rupert is upward of forty-five millions. 

Beside these figures, the sum necessary to put 
San Francisco on something like equal footing 
with her northern rivals sinks into nothingness. 

The present extent of San Francisco's wharfed 
waterfront is something more than eight miles. 
With the expenditure of a sum variously esti- 
mated between $200,000 and $500,000, land located 
near Islais Creek can be condemned and pur- 
chased, which will duplicate these eight miles. 

Only those with an economic impulse driving 
them elsewhere oppose the purchase of these sub- 
merged lands. They once belonged to the State; 
they should be returned. 

Appeal to California's Citizens. 

The harbor belongs to the State, hence the need 
of San Francisco making appeal to the citizens of 
the State for assistance to have the lands re- 
turned. The assistance asked is only a vote, as 
the tax to pay the interest and the sinking fund 
falls on the tolls of the harbor; not a dollar for 
the purchase of these lands or any portion of 
them will have to come from the pockets of any 
citizen of the commonwealth. 

It has been urged by those with economic in- 
terests in other sections of the harbor, or owning 
land that will be condemned, that the revenues of 
the harbor will not meet the current expenses, 
and the additional expense incident to the sinking 
fund and interest. Figures show that this argu- 
ment is made out of whole cloth. 

Admitting, in the face of the coming of a third 
transcontinental line to California, the building 
of numerous branch and independent roads 
throughout the State, that there will be no natural 
or stimulated increase in trade over that already 
possessed, the following figures show that the 
harbor tolls are ample to meet all outstanding 
obligations and the addition arising from the is- 
suance of these Islais Creek bonds: 

The cost of administration and maintenance of 
the harbor for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1906, was, in round numbers, $505,000.00. For the 
sake of argument let it be assumed that June 30, 
1910, the cost of administration and maintenance 
will increase five per cent, the increase in receipts 
standing stationary the while. This gives a sum 
of $530,000 which must be on hand, not later than 
the date mentioned, and which is chosen as it will 
be the first year affected by these bonds for the 
purchase of the submerged land to double the 
capacity of the harbor. Also, for the sake of 
argument, it is admitted that the condemnation 
and purchase of these submerged lands will cost 
$500,000. This will make it necessary to set aside 
$46,316 for sinking fund and interest on June 30, 
1910. Now we have: 

Administration and maintenance $530,000 

Sinking fund and interest on Ferry Bldg. 

bonds 55,572 

Seawall bonds, sinking fund and interest. 185,000 
India Basin (Islais Creek) fund and in 

terest 46,316 

Deferred payments due June 30, 1910.... 58,675 

Total fixed charges, including sinking 
fund and interest for purchase of 64 
blocks submerged land at Islais Creek. $875,563 
Again assuming that California has reached the 
apex of her development, and that there will be 
no increase in the revenues of the harbor between 
now and June 30, 1910, we find that there would 
still remain a surplus in the treasury of the 
Harbor Commissioners: 

Revenues for year ending June 30, 1906. .$965,990 
Estimated fixed charges as above 875,563 

Surplus $90,427 

Where the argument is made that the surplus of 
ninety-odd thousand dollars is too small a sum 
for new work, it may be urged that at this date 
(September 25, 1908), there still remain of unsold 
bonds upward of $1,500,000 in the hands of the 
Harbor Commissioners. Despite this fact, pro- 
vision has been made for paying the sinking fund 
and interest in the fixed charges quoted above. 
In the event that these bonds remain unsold up 
to June 30, 1910, no sinking fund and interest will 
be needed for them, which will leave a sum ap- 
proximating $140,000 additional in the treasury, 
which will provide for new construction until 
such time as an issue of seventy-five year bonds 
is possible, providing that the change of the Con- 
stitution is adopted. 
The figures here quoted are from the report of 



the State Harbor Commissioners and can be veri- 
fied at the office of the Commission in the Ferry 
Building, San Francisco. 

The Need of Relief. 

Everyone is agreed, even the few opposed to 
the India Basin Act, providing for the purchase 
of the submerged lands at Islais Creek, that the 
wharfage facilities at San Francisco are inade- 
quate and not at all in keeping with the import- 
ance and dignity of the great State of California. 
Many plans for improvement have been suggested 
from the extension of the pier line into the Bay, 
to the leveling of Goat Island. In the estimation 
of thirty-odd civic and labor organizations and 
both Houses of the State Legislature at a regular 
and again at an extra session, no plan offered is so 
feasible and so economical as the building of a 
great inland harbor at the mouth of Islais Creek, 
known as India Basin. Engineers have estimated 
that nine miles of wharfage can be secured at 
this point for an outlay per mile relatively fifty 
per cent below the cost of the present eight and 
three-tenths miles of wharfage. Four railroads 
have frontage on this proposed harbor — the West- 
ern Pacific, Southern Pacific, Santa Fe and Ocean 
Shore — the beginnings of a fourth transcontinen- 
tal system making a monopoly in that direction 
impossible. 

The issue lies with every voter in the State. 
Every man going to the polls in November must 
remember that he is the custodian of the future 
of the trade and commerce of California. He 
can help or hinder the logical development of the 
harbor of San Francisco, with which help or 
hindrance the development of the entire State 
is bound up. 

No argument affecting the postponement of the 
India Basin Act for the purpose of cutting down 
the number of blocks to be condemned should be 
considered. This is childish and primarily in- 
tended to defeat the measure at this election, with 
the hope that it will never be heard of again. 

No argument affecting the issuance of seventy- 
five-year bonds should be considered. That is 
foolish and primarily intended to cloud the issue 
by making a demand for something that is not 
yet provided for by the Constitution. 

No argument affecting the question of the har- 
bor tolls being able to bear the burden of the 
additional comparatively insignificant sinking 
fund and interest should be considered. That is 
vicious and primarily intended for the purpose of 
proving that the voters do not use their brains. 

A failure to secure these lands now will entail 
a heavy expense in the future, and one that the 
tolls of the harbor may not be able to meet. The 
improvements proposed by some of the owners 
of the submerged land who are in opposition to 
the Tndia Basin Act, will increase their value a 
hundredfold. This additional value will have to 
be paid for later when the need of buying these 
blocks becomes a problem of the life and death 
of San Francisco as a port. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 3, 1908. 

At the regular meeting of the Alaska Fisher- 
men's Union on October 2, the Secretary reported 
that fishing in all rivers of Bristol Bay had been 
exceptionally good last summer. Copper River, 
Cooks Inlet, Chignik and Pyramid Harbor were 
also good. Alitak, Karluk, Uyak Bay, Loring 
and Fort Wrangell were poor. Secretary also 
reported the loss of eight members in the Star 
of Bengal, which was wrecked on the Coronation 
Island on September 20. 

Delegates' reports were received as read and 
referred to the Committee on Wages and Con- 
ditions for the coming season. 

A Quarterly Finance Committee was elected to 
go over the books and accounts for the last two 
quarters. The Finance Committee was also elect- 
ed to serve as a committee to take charge of the 
funds subscribed by the fishermen for the widow 
and orphans of deceased Comrade August H. 
Sundberg. A. Shipwreck Committee was also 
elected. 

Delegates to the Fishermen's Conference, to be 
held at Seattle, Wash., November 10, will be bal- 
lotted for in the meetings held on October 16, 23 
and 30. 

Respectfully submitted. 

I. N. HYLEN, Secretary. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary pro tern. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1908. 

Shipping slack. 

H. P. GRIFFIN, Secretary. 
42 South St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 29, 1908. 
Shipping poor; prospects uncei tain. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
\]/ 2 A Lewis St. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 5, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., George Stedman presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping dull, but slightly improv- 
ing. Surviving members of crew of Star of Ben- 
gal applied for Shipwreck Benefit. Communica- 
tion received from Longshoremen's Union of the 
Pacific requesting a conference with the Sailors' 
Union to consider the jurisdiction question. 

E. ELLISON, Secretary pro tern. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Agency, Sept. 26, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

A. E. SIMMONDS, Agent. 
Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Shipping very dull; prospects a little better. 
H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

J. W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 21, 1908. 
Shipping at a standstill; prospects gloomy. 

JOSEPH T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San 
Regular weekly meet 
7:30 p. m., H. Frazer 
reported shipping quiet 
efit was ordered paid 
on the steam-schooner 
A Quarterly Finance 
Nominations of officers 
proceeded with. 

EUGEN 
Phone Kearny 5955. 



Francisco, Oct. 1, 1908. 
ing was called to order at 

in the chair. Secretary 
. The full Shipwreck Bcn- 

to Geo. Kariati, wrecked 

San Gabriel, in San Pedro. 

Committee was elected. 

for the ensuing term were 

E STEIDLE, Secretary. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 24, 1908. 
No shipping on sailing vessels; on steamers 
medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 27, 1908. 
No meeting; shipping poor. 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2155. 



DIED. 

The following are reported drowned in the 
wreck of the bark Star of Bengal, at Corona- 
tion Island, Alaska, on September 19, 1908: 

Carl Bore, No. 428, a native of Norway, aged 41. 

Andrew Hansen, No. 1727, a native of Norway, 
aged 25. 

Sigurd Nilsen, No. 763, a native of Norway, 
aged 24. 

Ole Peter Petersen, No. 773, a native of Nor- 
way, aged 36. 

Peter Petersen, No. 1127, a native of Norway, 
aped 48. 

Johan Peterson, No. 134, a native of Sweden, 
aged 54. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







OIN THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




"YOU FIRST, MR. VESSELOWNER." 



I ,ast April the Lake Carriers' Association 
decided not to deal with the unions, but to 
hereafter treat only with the individual 
seamen. As usual in such cases, they have 
since expended considerable money and en- 
ergy in an endeavor to compel their em- 
ployes to give up all union affiliations. 
What are their reasons for opposing 
unions? 

Workingmen organize labor unions for 
the purpose of securing better wages and 
improved conditions. Any attempt on the 
part of the employers to prevent the work- 
ers from organizing means that such em- 
ployers do not want to pay good wages nor 
permit other improvements needed by the 
employes. 

Likewise, any attempt on the part of em- 
ployers to disrupt a labor union means that 
such employers desire to get the union out 
of the way in order that they may reduce 
wages and impose harder conditions upon 
their employes. There can be no other rea- 
son. 

When an employer refuses to "recognize" 
a union, and announces his intention to deal 
with "individual" workmen only, it is clear 
that he doesn't want to deal "with" any- 
body, not even with the individual. His 
real intention is to deal "to"' the individuals 
whatever he pleases. 

When the individual workman expresses 
dissatisfaction with the "deal" he is getting 
the employer may sometimes lend a willing 
ear, but unfortunately he generally also ap- 
plies a "willing" foot, and Mr. Individual 
Workman loses his job. 

It may be true that such employers are 
often really willing to listen to complaints 
from their individual employes. By doing 
so they can easily discover just who the 
discontented workmen are and such in- 
dividuals can then be weeded out before 
others are- induced to join with them in 
demands for better conditions. 

Corporations or other concerns owning 
ships, mills, factories, mines, etc., are in 
the business to make profits. The object is 
to create as large an income as possible, and 
to expend as little as possible. Labor cost 
is one of the large items of expense. Par- 
ticular care is therefore taken to see that 
labor cost is kept as low as possible. 

When workingmen get together in a 
union they naturally discuss their griev- 
ances, and finally demand the proper rem- 
edy from the employer. In event of a re- 
fusal they may decide to quit work in a 
body, i. e., strike. Such demands for im- 
provements usually increase the labor cost 
of the concern involved, and are therefore 
often bitterly opposed by the employers un- 
til they discover that still greater cost (ex- 
pense) is likely to result on account of the 
strike. The employers are not particularly 
fond of increasing the wages of their em- 
ployes, hence they often object to unions, 
and announce that they prefer to deal with 
individuals only. 

When the "individual" workman goes up 
against the manager of a big corporation 
with the intention of increasing the labor 
cost of that concern, by asking for higher 
wages or shorter hours, he is asking that 



manager to reduce the profits of the cor- 
poration by increasing the expenditures. 
The manager was not put on the job to do 
anything like that. He will refuse, and will 
continue to refuse until such time as he finds 
it necessary to consider the request for the 
sake of the business of the concern. 

A workingman, acting singly and alone, 
can not create any necessity, from the cor- 
poration's point of view, for increasing the 
wages of the workmen. What possible 
chance has he got? 

History proves absolutely that only 
through organization, unionism, can labor 
hope to obtain and maintain decent wages 
and fair treatment. 

The individual system might do for the 
workingmen, if the employer would also 
agree to conduct his business purely as an 
individual. But where is the employer 
found willing to act as an individual? 
Everywhere there is organization among the 
employers; copartnerships, corporations, 
trusts representing large numbers of stock- 
holders, manufacturers' associations, vessel- 
owners' associations, and other organiza- 
tions in which the corporations themselves 
are bound together. 

Yet the vesselowners on the Great Lakes 
want the seamen to refuse to maintain a 
union. They desire to treat with "individ- 
ual" seamen only. To that proposition the 
seamen reply, "You first, my dear Gaston." 

Joshua Blunt. 



RECEIPTS OF GRAIN. 



Heavy receipts of grain give promise of 
what the shipments will be later in the 
season, when the grain rush down the Lakes 
really starts. Ships are plentiful. 

The receipts and shipments of grain for 
the week ended September 10, from the ele- 
vators in Duluth-Superior harbor are as fol- 
lows : 

Receipts. Shipments. 

Wheat 3,130,608 1,746,463 

Oats 216,450 9,100 

Rye 66,552 40,000 

Barley 759,329 495,251 

Flax 63,562 92,558 

Stocks of grain in store at the head of the 

Lake as compared with those of last year 
are as follows : 

Stocks. 

1908. 1907. 

Wheat 2,377,080 1,102.147 

Oats 327,255 64,927 

Rye " 90,951 1,267 

Barley 990,451 328,628 

Flax 276,230 145,884 



The schooner Armenia, which was sunk 
in 1906, N. 56 degrees W., 3^ miles from 
Pelee Passage lighthouse, was in 1907 
broken up and removed to a depth, ascer- 
tained by sweeping, of twenty-four feet be- 
low the surface of the Lake. This year the 
iron ore remaining in the wreck has been 
removed by Walter A. Metcalf, who now 
reports all obstruction removed to a depth 
of thirty feet in the shallowest place. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



ACCIDENTS OF THE WEEK. 



.Muskegon, Sept. 14. — The steamer Nyack of 
the Crosby Transportation Company, with 
twenty-five passengers aboard, passed Sunday 
night on a sand bar near Red Bank buoy in 
Muskegon Lake. The boat went on in the dense 
smoke that overhangs this section of the Lake 
and it was not until the life saving crew went to 
ssistance and called out a tug that the big 
steamer was released. 



Manitowoc, Sept. 14. — A claim for damages 
has been filed against the steamer Roosevelt, 
which brought the Marquette Club of Chicago 
here last Friday by Capt. William Williamson of 
the schooner Iris, for injury to the schooner 
when the Roosevelt struck her while going out 
of the harbor. 



Detroit, Sept. 14. — The steamer E. B. Osier, 
which was aground at Bar Point, was released 

and proceeded up the River to-day. 



Tile steamer Sierra bumped into the steamer 
D. R. 11 anna in the old River bed yesterday. 



11 arbor Beach, Sept. 19. — (Special.) — The steam 
barge Sonora, owned by G. A. Tomlinson, of Du- 

luth, went ashore six miles north of this place 
about noon to-day in the thick fog and smoke. 
She is out eighteen inches forward and is leaking 
some. She is resting on rock bottom. 



In their collision at Point Iroquois Wednesday 
the Pollock had her bow twisted to port and 
several plates damaged and the North Star sus- 
tained some damage above the water line. 



Detroit, Mich., Sept. 15.— (Special.) — The 
steamer Arthur Hawgood, bound down with ore, 
has been aground all day at Bar Point. The tug 
Harding and lighter Rescue are at work on her. 



Ashtabula, Sept. 18. — -Capt. Joe Mahon, master 
of the steamer E. F. Holmes, has been assigned 
to command of the steamer Arthur H. Hawgood, 
succeeding Capt. Shackett. 



Mackinaw City, Sept. 18. — The Steel trust 
steamer Phipps is here in a leaking condition as 
the result of striking on the south end of South 
Manitou Island yesterday afternoon while bound 
down light. She is awaiting orders as to which 
dry dock she shall proceed to for repairs. 



The Ball Brothers, which was aground at De- 
tour, was released yesterday. 



Cheboygan, Mich., Sept. 17 — (Special.) — Dur- 
ing the heavy fog and smoke last night the 
steamer City of Genoa, bound up with soft coal, 
went ashore on Poe's Reef. Harbor tugs have 
gone to the aid of the Genoa, and some of her 
cargo is being jettisoned. 



Cheboygan, Sept. 17. — (Special.) — The steamer 
Genoa was released about noon to-day after a 
small part of her coal cargo had been jettisoned. 
She apparently is not damaged. 



The schooner George B. Owen, which is on the 
bottom under the west breakwater, is being 
lightered. 



The steamer W. G. Pollock, which was hit by 
the steamer North Star above the Soo, arrived 
yesterday. All the damage is above the water 
line. She will be repaired here. 



The steamer Amazonas upbound light, with 
Montezuma and Granada in tow, stranded at Six 
Mile point during dense fog. She was released 
and passed up this afternoon. 



One of the barges of the Davidson fleet is 
aground at Six-Mile point. The tugs Sabin and 
General pulled on her yesterday. 



The ore cargo record making contest that 
is on at Ashtabula, was given another lift 
recently when the steamer Daniel J. Morrell 
landed with 12,126 tons. The Townsend, a 
sister-ship, started the ball rolling by bring- 
ing in 11,946 tons, the largest on the local 
record, then. The Morrell raised that by a 
small margin, and now for the first time puts 
the mark above 12,000. 



The Standard Oil Company's steamer No. 
2 and barge No. 57, which had been in the 
Lake trade all summer, will return to the 
Atlantic Coast at once. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



JOLTS BY JOSHUA. 



Agitate, Educate ! 



Spread the doctrine of unionism 



How about your standing, brother? 



Is your name on the "Roll of Honor" of 
the Lake Seamen's Union? 



Always "boost" your union. There are 
plenty of outsiders to "knock" it. Don't 
help them. 



The strength of a labor union is meas- 
ured by the loyalty and courage of the aver- 
age member. Look into your own heart, 
comrade, if you are all right you need not 
doubt your brothers. 



"Promises" made by employers are all 
very well — just so long as a good, solid 
labor union is in existence to insure that 
such promises are "made good." 



When a member disagrees with some per- 
son in the union, or is opposed to some ac- 
tion taken, he should not use that as an ex- 
cuse to criticize and condemn the whole 
union. The union as a whole is bigger and 
better in every sense than any part or act 
of its members. 



The only way in which the vesselowners 
can give "fair treatment" to seamen is by 
acknowledging the right of the seamen to 
have something to say as to what conditions 
they shall work under. And the only way 
seamen can get "fair treatment" is by as- 
serting that right. 



The wheelsmen and watchmen should re- 
member that their interests are identical 
with those of the ordinary-seamen. Were 
the wages of the deckhands ever cut with- 
out the wheelsmen's wages being lowered? 
The same ax hits both. The strength of all 
must continue to be pooled together. 



After declaring for "Open Shop" about 
six months ago, the Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion announced that the purpose of their 
action was to "retain full control of their 
boats." Nothing of the kind. Their real 
intention was plainly to "regain full control 
over the seamen of the Great Lakes." To 
this, naturally, the seamen have some serious 
objections to offer. 



Vessel property on the Great Lakes must 
have yielded immense profits during the past 
few years. In proof of that, witness the ac- 
tion of the owners who are members of the 
Lake Carriers' Association deciding to 
spend a lot of good money these "hard 
times" indulging in an attempt to disrupt 
the unions. Well, there's one good thing 
about it, anyhow ; it put a little more money 
in circulation. 



A good union man is not necessarily one 
who always insists upon the union taking 
care of his own particular grievances. The 
best kind of a union man is one who always 
considers the welfare of the entire member- 
ship, regardless of his own momentary 
troubles. Such a man is wise, too, because 
he recognizes that his own welfare is best 
safeguarded by working for the interests of 
the whole. 



The seamen naturally feel that as long as 
the vesselowners keep up an organization to 
protect the owners, it behooves the seamen 
to keep thoroughly organized in a union 
to look out for the welfare of their own side 
of the question. The seamen would rather 
be one of two lions, in spite of the roars 
that sometimes result, than to be a lamb 
looking for consideration from a lion. Two 
lions can get along together with safety to 
each other. But put a lamb alongside of a 
lion and see what happens. 



Some instances have been reported where 
captains paid a half-dollar, or more, for a 
copy of the pamphlet issued by the Lake 
District unions in July. A shrewd little 
newsboy is said to have done a land-office 
business at one of the ports selling the pam- 
phlets, which he had begged from the sail- 
ors, to captains who were in a hurry to get 
possession of them. 

Come up to the Union Hall, Captain ; you 
can get all such literature your heart de- 
sires, free gratis. (No questions asked as 
to why you want it, either.) 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



In the spring of 1900 the "Gloomy Gus" 
element on the Great Lakes were positive 
that the seamen could not be organized. It 
took less than thirty days to prove they 
were wrong. After the organization was 
formed in good shape the "gloomy" ones an- 
nounced their conviction that the seamen 
would not stick together. They were prov- 
en wrong again. Over eight years have 
passed since then, and the unions have pros- 
pered steadily. Lately, because of the 
present difficulties in industrial conditions 
on the Great Lakes, a few of the "gloom 
dispensers" are in evidence again. Just a 
very few, however. Well, they'll get more 
proof of their own poor judgment, that's all. 



It is rumored that if the vesselowners on 
the Great Lakes had been able to force a 
strike last spring they would have attempted 
to fill the places of the marine firemen by 
shipping foreign laborers from among the 
hundreds of unemployed steel-mill workers. 
The idea, as reported, was to put two or 
three non-English-speaking laborers in the 
place of each fireman, each watch to be in 
charge of one man able to speak English 
and to understand the language of the la- 
borers. He was to act as interpreter and 
"boss" fireman. 

There is little doubt that many such la- 
borers, hundreds being idle and in want, 
could have been induced to ship by promises 
of being given preference when the steel 
mills got busy again. The Marine Firemen, 
however, were not inclined to make room for 
them just yet. It's a good thing to know 
when to hang on. 

Joshua Blunt. 



The following detailed information has 
been received from United States Inspector 
John Clarke, Vermilion, Mich., regarding 
the steamer Chauncey Hurlbut, which went 
ashore on September 6 at Vermilion Point, 
about ten miles west of Whitefish Point. 
The Hurlbut lies directly northwest from 
the Vermilion Point Life-Saving station in 
16J/2 feet of water, about one-half mile east 
of the steamer Nimick. She Hes consider- 
ably inside of the course of passing vessels, 
but vessels of lighter draft can pass inside. 



E. J. Wheeler is inquired for by his sister, 
Mrs. Lillian Allen, 2619 J street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Roydon G. Egh will please communicate 
with Elda Roydon, 111 Cummings avenue, 
Superior, Wis. 

Comrade Walter Birrell will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Leonard Hull, R. F. D., 
No. 1, Hope, Mich. 

Second-Mate James Tobin, shipkeeper on 
the steamer Selwyn Eddy, at Milwaukee, is 
reported missing. 

Ed. Ratfenow, No. 5388, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is inquired for by his sister, Mrs. Chris 
Marquist, 429 N. Clark street, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Bonner, No. 7823, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is requested to communicate with his 
sister, who is very ill, at Kingston, Ontario. 

John Livingstone Ritchie, No. 21289, Lake 
Seamen's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. M. A. Ritchie, 283 N. Lisgar street, To- 
ronto, Ont. 

John McCormick, a marine fireman, who 
left the Lakes about a year ago, is inquired 
for by Frank McCormick, 191 Fourth street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. Important news. 

William Nilson, a native of Stavanger, Nor- 
way, last heard from at Buffalo, N. Y., in De- 
cember, 1907, is inquired for by his parents. 
Address, Nils Nilson, Nedre Blassenborg, No. 
9, Stavanger, Norway. 

Herbert Douglas, Lake Seamen's Union, 
No. 8400, is inquiring for his brother, John 
Douglas, who is supposed to have been seen 
recently in the Puget Sound country. He 
is 5 feet 8 inches in height, brown hair, blue 
eyes, fair complexion. Address Lake Sea- 
men's Union, 143 W. Madison street, Chicago. 

Members of the crew of the Olympia at 
the time of the accident to Charles Johnson, 
No. 4620, Lake Seamen's Union, while lying 
at the Lehigh Valley Coal Dock, in Su- 
perior, Wis., on August 23, 1907, are re- 
quested to send their addresses to the Head- 
quarters of the Lake Seamen's Union, Chi- 
cago, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis .' 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, Wis 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, Ont.. Canada Box 235 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, Pa 222 State Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT. MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

El anaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Wis. Sheboygan, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludington, Midi. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TRUSTS IN GERMANY. 



The Berlin Chamber of Commerce, in its 
annual report for 1907, devotes itself entirely 
to the subject of commercial trusts. It 
states that the organization of all branches 
of business in Germany into commercial 
unions increased largely during the year 
1907, and in support of this statement a long 
list of kartells or trusts in working order is 
furnished, though it is stated that the list is 
by no means complete. The report says that 
all these unions have one common feature in 
their constitutions, and that is the endeavor 
to improve the position of their members 
by strengthening relations with their cus- 
tomers, and by customers the middlemen are 
meant. The agreements all aim at unity of 
sale price. When the quality and price of 
an article differ in the case of different 
manufacturers the agreement aims at other 
commercial conditions, which, though less 
important than the question of price, have 
their interest as the subjects of commercial 
treatment. For instance, deliveries, methods 
of payment, discounts, free delivery of sam- 
ples, taking back unsold goods and other 
such matters, are subject to agreement. Very 
often agreements as to price are supple- 
mented, the report states, by understand- 
ings as to sale conditions. Some of these 
understandings do not aim at fixing a mini- 
mum sale price, but they compass the same 
end indirectly by restricting competition in 
the district or by regulating the output. 
If a retailer sells an article below the syndi- 
cated price no other goods manufactured by 
the syndicate are sold him. 

The kartells, according to the report, ex- 
hibit a very strong reaction on all non- 
syndicated industries, and act powerfully in 
bringing them under a similar system. This 
is done in part through means by which the 
less profitable type of business trusts have 
been gradually eliminated, and then lastly 
by the exercise of an indirect but very ma- 
terial pressure. Customers are bound to pay 
their syndicated purveyors within a strictly 
limited period, so that they have very little 
cash left at their disposal for the payment of 
non-syndicated purveyors. The latter have 
to wait a considerable time for their money, 
and end up by organizing kartells or trusts 
on their own account. 

The report also' states that numerous as- 
sociations have been formed whose object 
is to secure for members the advantages of 
buying on wholesale terms, and which are 
largely composed of employes and officials 
of public and private institutions. The re- 
port states that at first these trade organiza- 
tions were looked upon in Germany as a sort 
of noxious excrescence upon the surface of 
the commercial community, which it was the 
Government's duty to suppress. But to-day, 
it is stated, public opinion has become used 
to the phenomena and sees nothing amiss 
with their development. 

The principal grievances brought against 
the kartells or trusts are summarized by the 
report as follows : Concerning price policy, 
the kartells dealing with raw materials and 
semi-manufactured products are constantly 
accused of putting difficulties in the way of 
exporting German manufactured products, 
because they sell cheaper abroad than at 
home. Complaints are also made that the 
kartells raise or lower the price suddenly 
without giving any warning, while with free 
competition such changes only take place 



gradually. It is also stated that the influ- 
ence of a single governing body on a whole 
syndicated product has a very bad effect 
upon its manufacture from the technical 
point of view. Customers often receive quite 
other manufactured goods than those they 
ordered and often find themselves con- 
strained to accept brands quite different 
from what they ordered, merely in order to 
"keep in" with the governing body of the 
kartell. 



FACTS ABOUT LONDON. 



In London county proper there are 35,000 
people born in Wales, 56,000 natives of Scot- 
land and 60,000 of Ireland. There are 40,000 
natives of Russia and Poland, 27,000 of Ger- 
many, 11,000 of France, 10,000 of Italy, 6000 
of Austria, 4000 of Switzerland, 4000 of Hol- 
land and upward of 6000 natives of the 
United States. 

To convey Londoners from place to place, 
and their goods and their messages an army 
of 250,000 men and women is employed. 

There are 16,000 empty houses in London. 
In Kensington alone — one of the lowest- 
rated boroughs — the loss to the rates on 
empty houses for the last year amounted to 
more than £51,000. Yet on a given night 
more than 2400 people were counted sleeping 
out or trudging the streets apparently home- 
less. 

The total rental of London land and 
houses is £50,000,000 a year; £20,000,000 
of this is the rental value of the site — con- 
sisting largely of Thames-side marshland. 
In addition to rental value there are the rates 
to be considered, amounting to about £ 14,- 
000,000, apart from water. So that the cost 
of living in London is £64,000,000. The 
saleable value of the property at the present 
day would be more than £750,000.000. 
Thirty-five years ago it would have been less 
than half this amount. So that London in- 
creases in value at the rate of £12,000,000 
a year. 

In the City of London alone the ratable 
value in 1801 was £760 per acre per annum. 
To-day it is about £8000 per acre per an- 
num. 

Property worth £20,000,000 is adminis- 
tered by the City Companies. Their income 
at present is about £1,000,000 a year. 

The pauper class that seeks relief in Lon- 
don in a year numbers 430,000 people, or one 
in eleven of the population. One hundred 
and twenty thousand children are sent 
hungry to school. 

More than 16,000 children die annually 
under the age of one year. Broadly speak- 
ing, half the children of workingmen die 
before they reach five years of age, largely 
on account of impure milk. More than 300 
people are run over and killed in London in 
a year. Thirty thousand vehicles pass the 
Marble Arch in twelve hours. There are 
3500 blind people in London and 2000 deaf 
and dumb. There are 10,000 soldiers and 
16,000 policemen; 220,000,000 gallons of 
water are supplied daily in London. Nearly 
3000 Londoners are convicted of crime in a 
year and punished, at assizes and quarter- 
sessions ; 31,000 people leave London in a 
year for places outside Europe, 3000 going 
to the United States and 12,000 to Australia 
and New Zealand. — London Express. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATFORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and at not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
0E AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cat, 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts., 
P. O. Box 1335. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash.. 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
P.nx 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 334. 

PORTLAND. Or.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2380. 

HONOLULU, H. T., 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 
SAN PEDRO, Cat, P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cat, 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



COLUMB'A RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. Cal.. 200 M St. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WELLAND CANAL. 



The proposal of the Canadian Govern- 
ment to construct a new 25-foot Welland 
Canal at a cost of $25,000,000 to $30,000,000 
meets with strong indorsement in the Kings- 
ton district. The new canal would mean a 
vast increase in the transshipping at King- 
ston. With the larger locks and the deeper 
channel of the new canal many of the large 
vessels on the Upper Lakes which now 
transship at Buffalo would come on through 
to the foot of the Lakes at Kingston. The 
draft of these vessels would be too great to 
permit them going down the St. Lawrence 
to Montreal, so that most of them would 
transship at Kingston, the end of the Lakes. 
With this increase to its local trade, the ex- 
pansion would be marked and Kingston 
would soon resume its place as one of the 
commercial centers of Canada, for which it 
was selected by Frontenac when he first 
landed here in 1682. 

The present Welland Canal will not allow 
a steamer to carry more than 60,000 to 75,000 
bushels of wheat, the result being that the 
steamers going through the Welland Canal 
now are only about one-fifth the size of the 
big steamers that carry grain to Buffalo 
from the West and Northwest. 

It takes about seven days to make the 
trip from Chicago and Fort William to Buf- 
falo and return, exclusive of the time taken 
to discharge the cargo. Twenty-four hours 
longer would take this steamer from the foot 
of Lake Erie to Kingston via the Welland 
Canal. It is claimed the deepening of the 
Welland Canal and bringing the grain to 
Kingston for transshipment would mean a 
saving of not less than 2 l / 2 cents a bushel, a 
total saving of about 3 cents a bushel from 
Fort William. 

On the other hand, the advocates of the 
new Georgian Bay and Ottawa River Canal 
claim that this route would open up a dis- 
tinctly larger field for Canadian develop- 
ment, besides being a shorter route to Mon- 
treal. This route from the mouth of the 
French River on Georgian Bay to Montreal 
via the Ottawa, Mattawa, and French rivers 
is 440 miles. Of this about 400 miles is river 
and Lake waterway, with but 30 miles of 
actual canal to be built. The estimated cost 
by the Lake St. Louis and Saint Anne de 
Bellevue entrance for a 22-foot channel is 
$100,000,000. The Riviere des Prairies en- 
trance would cost $6,000,000 less. The en- 
gineers estimate that the canal would be 
open for traffic for 200 days in the year. 

Yet from the Kingston view point the 
building of the deeper Welland Canal would 
compare favorably with the more northern 
Georgian Bay route. The St. Lawrence 
route would be longer, but there is more 
open deep water to Kingston and much less 
canal digging and cost. Based on a crop of 
100,000,000 bushels of grain the Welland 
route would mean a reduction in grain rates 
of $6,000,000. 

This information is embodied in the views 
of a number of the leading grain transport- 
ers of Kingston, who claim that instead of 
three grain elevators at Kingston, the deep- 
ening of the Welland Canal would at once 
mean six or eight additional ones of even 
larger capacity. 

On account of geographical position and 
shorter distance to the Atlantic as well as 
more temperate climatic conditions, the 
building of the Welland Canal at a cost of 



$30,000,000 or the Georgian Bay Canal at a 
cost of $100,000,000 will not overcome finally 
or fully the advantages of waterways build- 
ing or proposed to be built in the United 
States. 

The enlargement of the Erie Canal from 
Buffalo through New York State, or the 
building of the new canal from Montreal 
through the Lake Champlain district to the 
Atlantic, or the larger project for the deep- 
ening of the Mississippi and connecting 
waterways from the Northwest to New Or- 
leans, means the continued supremacy of 
American Lake and Canal trade. These 
American waterways, when completed, will 
for some time to come more than offset the 
advantages of the longer and more danger- 
ous St. Lawrence route, beset with narrow 
channels and rock shoals and swift currents, 
late and thick fogs and ice blockades, and 
the short and dangerous season across the 
Newfoundland banks, not as safe as either 
of the proposed American routes till after 
June 1, at least. 

If, however, either the Welland Canal is 
enlarged or the Georgian Bay route lie- 
comes a certainty it means a very large ad- 
dition to the Canadian carrying trade 
through its own territory to Montreal and 
a considerable increase in the trade through 
the lower St. Lawrence. 



ABSINTHE PROHIBITION. 



In reporting that the manufacture, im- 
portation, and sale of absinthe in Switzer- 
land is now prohibited, Vice-Consul Leo J. 
Frankenthal, of Berne, gives the following 
particulars of the recent referendum by 
which this was accomplished : 

In a previous consular report by the writ- 
er on the practical workings of the popular 
initiative in Switzerland, the absinthe initia- 
tive was explained at length. It was ac- 
cepted by the Swiss people on Sunday, July 
5, 1908, by a vote of 236,582 against 135,888. 
The total vote cast was 372,470 from a vot- 
ing strength of over 807,700, showing that 
335,000 voters did not go to the polls. Its 
acceptance amends the Swiss constitution 
by a paragraph prohibiting the .manufacture, 
importation, and sale of absinthe in Swit- 
zerland. Damages will undoubtedly be paid 
to the manufacturers in the Canton Neu- 
chatel, where a flourishing export industry 
had been built up. The Federal alcohol 
monopoly will lose a large sum annually. 

The vote of the French cantons — Geneva, 
Vaud, Valais, Fribourg, and Neuchatel — 
where absinthe is consumed, and where, in 
Geneva and Vaud, its sale was recently pro- 
hibited by cantonal ordinances, rejected the 
Federal initiative by a small majority. The 
vote in the German cantons, however, 
where absinthe is practically unknown, 
turned the tide in favor of the measure. 
Thus its fate was decided for the citizens of 
western Switzerland, who were personally 
interested, by the votes of those in the other 
cantons, whom the measure did not affect. 
Central and eastern Switzerland had been 
appealed to by the western or French can- 
tons to support them in voting in favor of 
the initiative, while the votes cast show that 
the French cantons as a whole rejected it. 

hi some cantons the affirmative vote fell 
far behind the number of signatures to the 
initiative petition. In Canton Berne, where 
38,337 voters had signed the initiative peti- 
tion, only 24,593 voted for it, or 13,744 less 



than the number of signatures originally 
obtained. In Neuchatel 9,628 signed the 
petition for the abolition of absinthe, and 
but 6,340 voted for it upon the clay of elec- 
tion. Fribourg shows 9,535 signatures in 
favor of the petition and 7,144 votes for the 
measure on election day; Glarus secured 
3,420 signatures against 2,800 votes, and 
Basel-land 4,022 signatures to the initiative 
and 2,843 votes in the affirmative. A favor- 
ite placard of its adherents was a radiant 
white cross behind the range of the snowy 
Alps, printed upon a red ground, with the 
legend, "One for all, all for one. Vote 
Yes.' " 

The question now arises how the Federal 
prohibition will work, since the Federal 
Government has no police force of its own 
and is dependent upon the cantonal police. 
If 50,000 of the 135,000 voters against the 
initiative sign a second initiative, they can 
force the matter to a popular vote for the 
second time. 

Another constitutional amendment (not 
proposed by the initiative) was accepted on 
the same day, and empowers the Federal 
Government to enact regulations concern- 
ing trades and handicrafts. This will cause 
a unification of the various cantonal ordi- 
nances regarding apprenticeship, settlement 
of disputes between capital and labor, and 
is far-reaching in its scope. The present 
factory legislation is about to be revised and 
extended. 



AFRICAN WHALING ENTERPRISE. 



A company, with head offices at Sandef- 
jord, Norway, has recently been formed, 
with the object of exploiting the whaling 
grounds adjacent to the South African coast, 
particularly that of Natal. 

There is to be a station of the company 
at Durban, where a plant for extracting oil 
and bone will be established. The method 
to be pursued will be the same that has 
been adopted with success in Norway, and 
the men engaged in the work will be Nor- 
wegians who have had experience in the in- 
dustry. Briefly, the plan is to use two small 
whaling steamers which have been acquired 
by the company, and, making Durban the 
base of operations, to scour the coastwise 
waters, and as soon as a whale is taken, to 
tow the body into the harbor, where the 
work of extraction will be done. By this 
means, it is said that a saving of time is 
effected, and the process of reduction is 
facilitated. 

It is claimed that these steam-whalers 
are able to take all kinds of whales with 
comparative immunity from risk, as the ex- 
plosive harpoon is fired directly from the 
steamer, and the danger of pursuing the 
"fish" in small boats is obviated. There 
are large numbers of whales near the coast, 
and there seems to be a fair prospects of 
success for a small company to run on the 
most economical lines. The capital of the 
company is $75,000, and shares to the full 
amount have been taken in Natal and Nor- 
way. 



The first comb factory in British India 
has recently begun operations at Cuttack, 
and is reported to have most excellent pros- 
pects. It is fitted with the latest machinery 
and controlled by an expert comb maker 
from Scotland. The local demand will sup- 
port the enterprise. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA, CAL. 



The United States battleship fleet 
arrived at Manila, P. I., on October 
2. 

Recent reports having failed to in- 
dicate the presence of yellow fever in 
Havana, Cuba, the Public Health and 
Marine Hospital Service has removed 
the quarantine against that city. 

The United States battleships Ala- 
bama and Maine arrived at Gibraltar 
on September 30 from Naples. The 
ships will coal there preparatory t" 
sailing for Horta, Azores Islands. 

Convinced of the practicability of 
the heavier-than-air flying machine in 
naval operations, the Navy Depart- 
ment will shortly advertise specifica- 
tions for proposals for the purchase 
of several such craft. 

The five apprentices selected by the 
Philadelphia (Pa.) Commissioners of 
Navigation to serve under Pennsyl- 
vania pilots for six years have suc- 
cessfully passed the physical require- 
ments and were duly indentured. 

Because of the announcement of 
two cases of yellow fever in Havana. 
the United States Marine Hospital 
Service in New Orleans, acting on 
orders from Washington, has put into 
into effect a quarantine against Cuba. 
The Hamburg-American liner 
Deutschland arrived at Xew York re 
cently from Hamburg after one of 
the roughest passages she had ever 
experienced, according to Captain 
Kaemff. She was five days 23 hours 
and 27 minutes on the passage. 

What is said to be the largest single 
order for steel plate ever received 
by the Carnegie Steel Company is 
that of the Pittsburg Steamship Com- 
pany, which has ordered 80,000 tons 
of steel plate to be used in building 
ore vessels at the Loraine (O.J docks. 
Icebergs are still to be reckoned 
with by transatlantic steamships, as 
was shown recently when the Phila- 
delphia transatlantic liner Crown 
Point from London reported passing 
an unusually large berg on September 
10 in latitude 46.24 north, longitude 
47.27 west. 

The British steamship Manchester 
Spinner, which recently arrived at 
Rotterdam from Pensacola and Nor- 
folk, landed the crew of the British 
bark Granada, from Campbellton, N. 
B.; for New York, previously re- 
ported abandoned August 31 in lati- 
tude 40, longitude 61. 

Maritime men are greatly interested 
in a report from United States Con- 
sul-General Robert J. Wynne, of Lon- 
don, that gambling in ships by per- 
sons who take out insurance policies 
on British vessels in which they have 
no interest is to be suppressed by the 
British Government if possible. 

A dispatch from Sydney, C. B., says 
the Dominion Coal Company has been 
obliged to discontinue coal shipments 
up the St. Lawrence owing to the 
dense smoke from forest fires. The 
company will have to charter addi- 
tional vessels to overtake shipments 
this fall. Twenty-two steamers were 
recently tied up between Montreal 
and Quebec. 

The new Mallory liner Brazos, 
which cost $1,000,000 has made her 
initial run to Galveston, leaving New 
York on October 3, and will remain 
in commission thereafter on the direct 
service between New York and the 
Gulf port. The Brazos is one of the 
largest, fastest and most luxuriously 
appointed coastwise ships in the 
world. She was built at Newport 
News, Va., and launched in June. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDO. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 




Foul Catarrh 



DEAFNESS, DYSPEPSIA, BLINDNESS, 
BAD BLOOD, DISEASE, DEATH, FOL- 
LOW THE RAVAGES OF FOUL 
CATARRH. 

Upon request we will send an abso- 
lutely free treatment which we know 
will immediately benefit any catarrh suf- 
ferer, no matter how long standing the 
disease may be. Not a patent nostrum, 
but a scientific remedy, put up from a 
■ list's prescription and guaranteed 
to be absolutely free from cocaine, mor- 
phine, chloroform or opiates of any kind. 
It's use is positively safe. If you want a 

Free Treatment 

all you need do is send your name and 
address at once to E. L. Baldwin, Phar., 
20-S Market St., San Francisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Charles Lagerberg is inquired for 
by his brother, Theodore. Address 
U. S. S. McAthur, Seldovia, Alaska. 

Bror Henry Wilhelm Clausen, a 
native of Doderhults, Forsamlin, Swe- 
den, born 1880, is inquired for. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George R. O'Connor, who arrived at 
San Francisco in January, 1908, on the 
steamer Olson & Mahony, is inquired 
for. Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

"Mick" Loughlin, sailing on the 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother N. M. Loughlin, Dredge Eta, 
Narvoma, South Coast, via Sydney, 
N. S. W., Australia. 

Edward Emil Gustafsen, a native of 
Finland, last seen in July at San 
Francisco, is inquired for by John E. 
Johnson, 2428 Tenth street, West 
Berkeley. 

Hans Faroldre, a native of Aale- 
sund, Norway, is inquired for by his 
parents. Any one knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. John B. 
Sother, Aalesund, Norway. 

Ernst Sawitza, aged 23, last heard 
of in 1905, at that time a member of 
the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
is inquired for by Theo. Sieger, 1247 
Cottage Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, - Eureka, Cal. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. K. ABKAIIAMSEN, Prop. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET. COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing. Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnside 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE "ALOHA" 

Harry Klemme, Proprietor. 

P'hst-Class Rooms at very moderate 
rates. Summer garden attached. 

Cor. Queen and Richard Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Jack Kittilsen is inquired for by 
Chas. Johnson, South Island, George- 
town Co., S. C. 

Dietrich Doerflein, a native of 
Nurnberg, Germany, is inquired for 
by the German Consulate, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Lars, Fred and Carl, Herman Ost- 
land, sailing on the Pacific and At- 
lantic Coast, respectively, are inquired 
for by their brother, Edward. Ad- 
dress, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Whoever knows the whereabouts 
of Seaman Julius Friedrich Clausen, 
born at Flensburg, Germany, is re- 
quested to inform the German Consul, 
51 Third street, San Francisco. 

Henry Laurent, who has been sail- 
ing between San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts will please communicate with 
the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Carl Alfred Anderson, aged about 
50, and Johan Bernard Anderson, aged 
about 47, natives of Halmstad, Swe- 
den, last heard from at. San Francisco 
16 years ago, are inquired for by their 
brother, B. A. Anderson, 310 Richland 
avenue, San Francisco. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period if 
not called or sent for. 

Aheng, C. Kuntz, K. 

Allen, J. W. Larsen, H. J. 

Andersen, Albert Lattz, L. 

Anderson, A. P. Lohme, E. 

Anderson, Hjalmar Larson, F., -1098 

Anderson, J., -1514 Lebrun, E. 

Anderson, A. Leaky, W., -925 

Anderson, Victor Leisman, J. 

Axes, P. Lepp, E. 

Barry, Thomas Lie, J. C. 

Baandsen, E. M. Lind, H. E. 

Barwa, D. Lindin, II. Van 

Bakke, M. C. Lindburg, John 

Bateman, S. J. Lindman, H. C. 

Bernard, S. Lindroos. C. 

Benners, Llchlenberg, Max 

Bensen, J. E. Lockey, H. 

Berg, H. M. Lunder, B. 

Bergren, John Lundquist, J. 

Bertelsen, Alf. Lubeck, R. A. 

Bernsen, C. T. Lundblad, E., -789 

Berkelund, R. Madison, Chas. 

Blomquist, B. Marthisen, M. 

Blomqulst, H. Mayers, P. M. 

Roman, O. W. Mannian, James 

Brander, M. F. Marthininssen, K. 

Bruhn, B., -1430 McKerron, W. 

Buchtman, P. McAdam, J. 

Burke, James Meddicott, F. 

Casperson, Chr. Mikelson, C. 

Cornell, G. B. Mikkelson, Jos. 

Clarkson, C. H. Mortensen, Chr. 

Courtney, A. I. Mortensen, Holger 

Conigan, P. J. Mare, C. F. 

1 'ci rick, Geo. Murphy, D. 

Dinwooden, Jas. H. Myren, A. 

Donovan, James Nelsen, Martin 

Dowling, S. G. Newland, E. 

I >rager, Otto Nielsen, Jorgen 
Edwards, E. M., -149Nielsen, Karl 

IMvardson. John Nielsen, N. C. 

Fkvall, G. A. Nyburg, Eric 

Fllingsen. P., -568 Olsson, E.,-966 

Elwood, Alf. Olsson, Johan 

Elliasen, H. O. Olsson, Otto 

Emersen, E. Olsen, H., -959 

Falch, O. A. Olsson, Oscar 

Faluck, L. Orchard, S. H. 

Farley, Geo. Overvik, Thos. 

Fitzgerald, H. Paulson. Paul 

Flynn, P. J. Petterson, O., -710 

Fnurnier, G. Petersen, Olavus 

Frohery, F. Pederse. Lars 

Oad, V. Pedersen, O. A. 

Gent, A. C. Pedersen, Kristlan 

Gilifson, Frank Pendville, N. 

Gronlund, Oscar Pemberton, D. 

Orusden, Edw. Pietanzo, A. 
Gustafson, A. W.,Pfelfer, K. 

-700 Paige, L. 

Gudmundsen, J. Rasmussen, F. 

Guttman, H. Rasmussen, N. C.. 
Gulliver. W. H. -924 

Hehkonen, G. A. Sanches, F. 

Hansen, Jens M. Schulz, E., -1842 

Hansen, E. A. Sibelin, Chr. 

Hansen, Mike Siverksen, S. B. 

Daftness, M. Shane. J. 

Hagman, H. Sovig. C. 

Ilealey, James Soderlund, J. F. 

Helman, Karl Stuho, M. 

Hixon, J. W. Steinburg, A. 

Hange, A. Sundqulst. C. 

Daygard, T. S. Svensen, J. 

Holmgren, G. J. Swensson, B. 

Huslide, H. Taxt, Thos. 

Ivertsen, S. B. Tell ef sen, P. 

Iversen, P. Tennant, T. 

Jamison, J. Thompson, R. 

Jacobson, H. J. Thoralls, L. M. 

Jack, Paul Tuominen, Alf. 

Jaaperaon, J. Vagnhill, G. 

Jensen, Johannes Wahlstedt, A. R. 

.lohansen, C. J. Wahlstedt, G. R. 

Johnson, Gunder Wankle, F. 

Johansen, Carsten Walz, E. 

Jaimson, Nils Wallace, A. 

Jerfold, Theo. Webber, C. 

Joakinson, W. Whitley, A. 

Johnson, Alf. Winsmer, Geo. 
Karlson, K. A., -651 Williamson, A. 

Kalmlng, J. Waulters, H. 

Kalnou, A. Worm, A. 

Kahlbetzer, F. Walters, W. 

Kleine. Carl Wokes, H. 
Klingenburg, J.. -660Zimmer, W. 
Kristoftersen, Geo. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

A. 1.. Shaube, who was 2nd mate 
<>n the steam-schooner San Pedro, in 
the collision with Columbia, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Ed. Larsen, also known as Edward 
Torkelscn, last heard of in the bark 
Hesper in 1893, is inquired for by hi« 
brother, Jonas. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Olaf Johanneson, a native of Sei- 
desfjord, Iceland, last heard of on the 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address S. J. Westdal, 51 
South street, New York City. 

Charles Johannes, a native of Ber- 
lin, Ontario, aged about 35, supposed 
to be on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Charles Porter, Fred Choate and 
Soren Sorensen, who were wrecked in 
the Maggie C. Russ, are requested to 
call upon Attorney H. W. Hutton, 
Pacific Building, San Francisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT 


BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND 

Cor. of HERON 

ABERDEEN, 


JEWELRY 

& G STS. 
WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Alexander & McBride 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 
' PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. . 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH, 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., of Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, - SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 
220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 
494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



Home News. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Oscar Sunersson, last heard of 
about four years ago when employed 
in a tug at San Francisco, is inquired 
for by his brother. Address, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



See that this label (in light blue) 



^r » m ^^v ¥^"1"~~^ "f~""fc &?** bee tllat tnis laDel ( - in nglu D u ; 

^^fc I X/ 1 m 9 fctl 1™ < Y^T A^fcappc.-irs on the box in which 

oiyivyivL^rvo p u are served . 



Issued by Authority of tne Cigar Matters' International Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 

(Zltrt dnlrfif^. That the Cigars contained InlMs box law ton mado by a flGtCfaSS Hfoital 
a WLHtSCrtOF THE CBAK MAKERS 'MTUIKATIOIAL UNION of America, an organization devoted h> tho ad- 
vancement of the M0RA1 MATERIAland INlElLEtllJAI Wli i ARt OF THE CRATT. Therefore wo icrcorautta) 
, these Cigars to alt smokers Ulrcuqhout the wotlri. 
Ail IflfrirqtoaTU upon this UosJ «dl be punished accoftfmq to law 



«• SMILE 



* CM. l.U mi 



'/ ' Amfrica 



LOCAL 



6TAMP 




BY INSISTING UPON PURCHAS- 
ING UNION STAMP SHOES 

You help better shoemaking conditions. 
You get better shoes for the money. 
You help your own Labor Position. 
You abolish Child Labor. 

Do Not Be Misled by retailers who 
say: "This shoe does not bear the 
stamp, but is made under Union Condi- 
tions." 

This is false. No shoe is union-made 
unless it bears the Union Stamp. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec- freas. 



Expert charity workers in Philadel- 
phia, Pa., estimate that 75,000 persons 
will be unemployed in that city dur- 
ing the coming winter. 

The City Trustees of Sacramento, 
Cal., have ordered an ordinance drawn 
up for the exclusion of all aliens from 
positions under the city government. 

A monument to Simon Fraser, who 
discovered the Fraser River in 1808, 
was unveiled on September 30 at New 
Westminster, B. C, by Premier Mc- 
Bride. 

The War Department has recently 
made improvements in powder and 
shells which promise to increase the 
effective range of ordnance 75 per 
cent. 

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. is to begin 
service with the Hartford (Conn.) 
Carpet Works at Thompsonville. It 
is thought he will enter the operating 
department. 

The Indiana Legislature in special 
session on September 26, passed a 
county local option bill, the vote in 
the House being 55 to 45. The bill 
now goes to the Governor for signa- 
ture. 

Governor Curry of New Mexico, 
after calling on the President on Sep- 
tember 24, intimated that the Presi- 
dent promised he would urge State- 
hood for New Mexico in his next mes- 
sage to Congress. 

Nine members of the Italian Black 
Hand, convicted through the confes- 
sions of members of their own soci- 
ety, were sentenced at Fernie, B. C, 
on September 26, to terms from six 
to seven and a half years. 

Immigration to the United States 
or the inbound movement of steer- 
age passengers from Europe is again 
greater than the eastward movement. 
For some months the emigration had 
been larger than the influx. 

Broughton Brandenburg, who sold 
the New York Times a political arti- 
cle which he said had been dictated 
and signed by Grover Cleveland, fa- 
voring the election of Taft, has con- 
fessed that the article was a forgery. 

By the 1st of January the transcon- 
tinental railroads hope to be able to 
increase freight rates on over eighty 
commodities west bound and on about 
twenty commodities east bound be- 
tween all points and the Pacific Coast. 

President Roosevelt has decided 
that W. E. Glasscock must resign as 
Internal Revenue Collector for the 
West Virginia district if he continues 
in the race for Governor of that State 
as the Republican compromise candi- 
date. 

It is reported that nearly 5000 Chi- 
nese have been smuggled into the 
United States from Mexico during the 
past two years, at prices varying from 
$275 to $500. A number of Immigra- 
tion inspectors have been dismissed 
as a result of the exposure. 

An army of the maimed and crip- 
pled victims of casualties on the Met- 
ropolitan Street Railway of New 
York City has been practically barred 
from collecting judgments in damage 
suits by the throwing of the company 
into receivers' hands. 

The number of deaths in Hawaii 
during the year ending June 30 was 
2760, a decrease of 262 from the fig- 
ures of the previous year. Births 
numbered 4593, an increase of 1745 
over the previous year, chiefly among 
the Japanese. There was a consider- 
able increase in the number of deaths 
from tuberculosis, also chiefly among 
the Japanese. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The ninth annual convention of the 

California State Federation of Labor 
opened at San Jose, Cal., on October 5. 
Four more shops of the Winslow 
Glass Company, at Columbus, O., re- 
sumed operations on October i. They 
have been shut down for several 
months. 

Owing to the strike of cotton « 
ers in certain parts of England, and 
which has resulted in a number of 
mills closing down, Philadelphia will 
also suffer a loss in a financial way 
by tlie stoppage of cotton exports. 

George A. Tracy, President of the 
California State Federation of Labor 
and of the San Francisco Typograph- 
ical Union, has been nominated for 
Congress by the Democratic, Union 
Labor and Independence parties. 

The executive officers of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Bookbinders 
are engaged in the work of registering 
their union label in several States. It 
is reported the work is progressing 
favorably and upon its completion the 
labels will be issued. 

The 8000 miners employed in the 
collieries of Wyoming, who went on 
strike on September 1, returned to 
work on the 26th under a temporary 
agreement between the mine operators 
and representatives of the United 
Mine Workers of America. 

Affiliation of the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen 
with the British Associated Society of 
the Brotherhood of Locomotive En- 
gineers and Firemen, or steps leading 
to that end, is being discussed by the 
bodies concerned. 

Prominent railway officials and rep- 
resentatives of labor employed on 
railways have organized "The Amer- 
ican Railroad Employes and Inves- 
tors' Association." Among the pur- 
poses of the organization are to op- 
pose railroad legislation. 

Scenes of disorder occured in many 
parts of New York City on October 
4 as a result of a strike of the chauf- 
feurs of the New York Taxicab Com- 
pany. The strikers demand the sub- 
stitution of a daily wage of $2.50 in 
place of the commission system. 

Canadian Pacific Railway engineers 
recently notified the company that 
they would not run engines longer 
than a certain period if the strike is 
not settled. It is said that the com- 
pany is preparing another ultimatum, 
in which they will offer to reinstate 
strikers under certain conditions. 

The International Association of 
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers 
in convention at Indianapolis, Ind., on 
September 29, re-elected all the pres- 
ent officers and delegates but one, J. 
II. Hadry, of St. Louis, who succeeds 
J. F. Dayer, of San Francisco, as 
delegate to the American Federation 
of Labor. 

The fifteenth biennial convention of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America opened at Salt 
Lake City, Utah, on September 21. 
About 400 delegates attended. Among 
the leading questions discussed was 
the apprentice system, old-age pen- 
cil, n--. a sanatorium and some method 
of handling cases of tuberculosis. 

E. W. Parker, chief statistician of 
the Geological Survey, asserts that 
benefit will result from the action of 
Congress in appropriating $150,000 to 
investigate mine disasters. He says 
one of the greatest needs of the coal- 
mining industry is the enforcement 
of military discipline in the operation 
of the mines. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters :it the San Francisco Sailors' 

Union Office are advertised for three 

the only and will be returned to the 

l',,st Office at the expiration of five 

months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
1'. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
in the port of their destination. 



Aaltonen, R. 

Abrahamsen, Chas 
Adams, L>. J. 
Alvarez, P. Lopez 
Andersen, A. Emil 
Andersen, -11233 
An. lii sen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Nils a. 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, Olaf 
Anderson, -764 
Anderson, -991 
Anderson, C. 
Anderson, A. C. 
Banke, -1646 
Bateman, S. J. 
i tai jiiu, V. 
Barry, Michael 
Bastlan, \V. 
Bauman, Ernest 
Bausback, Erwin 
Becker, Fred W. 

I. rill', F. 

■Inis, (J. 

Behrens, Fred 
Bensen, -143 
Bensen, B. 
Bensen, H. 
Bensont -1454 
Benson, John 10. 
Beutheusen, H. 
Berndt, Hugo 
Bernert, Fred 
Campbell, Geo. 
Carstensen, M. F. 
Chrlstensen, Wm. 
Christensen, Viggo 
Christensen, -905 
Cnristensen, E. H. 
I .'allien, Hugo 
Uahlof, John 
Dalman, F. 
l ranberg, A. 
I lanielscn, Sigurd 
l /avidsen, Jacob 
De Baers, Henry 
den Haan, C. 
Easton, R. W. 
Ekendahl, -565 
Ekholm, Fians 
Lklund, Ellis 
Ekstedt, Harold 
Eliasen, E. 
Kllet'sen, Andreas 
Elliott, E. 
Engelgren, Budv. 
Engman, Chas. 
Falk, John A. 
Fatt, Knut 

I. Sigurd 
Findley, H. 
Fischer, Torsten 
FJelman, Jonas 
Forslund, Victor 

Gad, Sophus 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Gonzalez, Juan 
Gere, A. 
Gillholm, Albin 
(Jovan, A. 
Grant, John 
Grawert, Johan 
fludmansen, A. B. 
Haagensen, M. 
Haak, R. 

Haasenritter, Carl 
Hagbartsen, M. 
Haier, Fred 
Hall, W. F. 
I lanimargrin, O. 
Hansen, Marius 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen, -777 
Hansen, -1381 
Hansen, -1680 
Hansen, -1723 
Hansen, C. J. 
I hnisen, J. P. 
Harris, John E. 
Harris, J. 
lversen, Andreas 
Jameson, Joe 
Janson, -1779 
Jarvie, W. 
Jensen, Jas. B. 
Jensen, Niels E. 
Jensen, Jens P. 
Jensen, -1578 
Jensen, Rasmus 
Jensen, -1634 
Jenson, Johannes 
Johansen, Joakim 
Johansen, Theo. 
Johansen, A. F. 
Johanson, Elis R. 
Johansen, Sigurd 
Johansen, C. E. 
Johansen, Hjalmar 
Johansson, F. 

Kaasik, A. 
Kahlbetzer, Ferd 
Kalning, J. P. 
Kalnis, Harry 
Kane, G. 
Kohne. Ernst 
Kerstein, Carl 
Klint, Herman 
Karlsen, Karl J. 
Karlson, -1158 
Karlsson, C. E. 
Karlsson, N. 
Karsberg, C. 
Kastberg, Karsten 

Baanti, Moses 
Bagerberg, Chas. 
Lahmeyer, H. 

Landgren, J. 
Bang, Chas. 
Lantz, Gustaf 
Larsen, -1271 
Barsen, Ludv. J. 
Barsen, Lars 
I. arson, -1290 

u, Louie 
Barsen, -1842 
Barsen, -644 



Anderson. H A. 
Anderssen, -1.98 
Andreasen, M. 
Andersson, -1246 
Andersson, 1552 
Andersson, Ernst 
Andreassen, -1334 
Anenson, Gus 
Arnesen, Isak 
Aske, John 
Aspen, Knut 
Atkinson, Samuel 
Axelsen, Axel 

Beyerle, Ruppert 
Bluhm, Albert 
Bodungen, F. 
Boisen, J. 
Boogren, Eric 
Borresen, Niels 
Boss, B. A. 
Bowland, Chas. 
Brander, Oscar 
Brandsten, Ernst 
Brandt, Fred 
Brown, John 
Burdt, Paul 
Burger, A. 
Burke, Eugene 
Burmeister, T. F. 
Burnett, Chas. C. 
Burns, Chas. E. 

Christoffersen, Berge 
Christoffersen, -614 
Clarke, R., -HIT 
Coadon, -481 
Corneliusen, Jens 

Doose, Wm. 
Dlkender, M. 
Dories, H. 
Dowe, John 
Dreifeldt, Alb. 
Dryden, Wm. 
Dyrnes, Budv. E. 

Eriksen, -595 
Eriksen, Beonard 
Erickson, Mike 
Erickson, -493 
Eriksen, Edmund 
Eriksen, Anton 
Eriksson, -333 
Eskildsen, N. P. 
Espensen, E. N. 
Evensen, Andrew 
Foss, Laurits L. 
Foyn, Sam 
French, J. A. 
Friebel, Herman 
Frivold, John 
Fuchel, Gustav 

Guillou. Joseph 
Guldberg, Randolf 
Gundersen, Johan 
Gundersen, Tandrup 
Gunderson, Christ 
Gunn, Bert 
Gustafsson, J. E. 
Guzek, B. 

Haupt, Emil 
Heesche, Heinrich 
Hess, August 
Hill, G. 
Hines, Jas. 
Hjort, Knut 
Hochmann, Aleck 
Hogstrom, A. J. F. 
Hohman, H. 
Hoist, R. 
Holland, E. Scott 
Holmlund, Arthur 
Holt, Karl C. 
Hull, Hendriek 
Hustede. Heinrich 
Hutchinson, Ed. 



Johansson, -1677 
Johansson, Nils 
Johnsen, Edward 
Johnsen, -1064 
Johnsen, J. P. K. 
Johnson, Gus. 
Johnson, -1877 
Johnson, -393 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, G. Edwin 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Chas. 
Johnson, J. E. 
Johnson, David E. 
Jones, Magnus P. 
Jones, P. 
Jurgensen, H. 
Justersen, Peter 

Klemm, A. 
Klintberg, Chas. 
Knutsen, Knut 
Kopman. J. 
Koso, Pet 
Krauschat, A. 
Kristensen, -1088 
Kristensen, Karl 
Kristoffersen, Karl 
Kenny, G. 
Kristoffersen, O. T. 
Kugam, Fred J. 
Kunedt, Wm. 



Larsen, Knut C. 
Barsen, Einar A. 
Lausmann, John 
Laws, Harry 
Leahy, -925 
Lenn, Tonny 
Lersten, J. O. 
Lewald, IT. 
Liesman, Fritz 
Liljifalk, S. 
Lindberg, John 
Bindholm, E. A. 
Lindfors, Karl 



Lindkvist, -1014 
Lindroos, Oscar 
Lindstrom, Anton 
Loenecke, -1321 
Lowena, J. 
Lucas, J. W. 
Madsen, Thorolf 
Magnuson, Gust. 
Magnussen, Axel 
Martinson, A. 
.Mason, Chas. 
Mason. C. 

.Malison, K. J. 

Mayer, Peter 
McAdam, J. 
McGuire. John 

Nelson, Charles 
Nelson, Geo. 
Nester, Wilson 
Neumann, Aug. 
Nicolaisen, Otto 
Nicolaysen, H. 
Nielsen, Sivert 
Nielsen, Geo. 
Oberg, C. W. - 
O'Keeffe, W. 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, Emil M. 
Olsen, Chas. 
Olsen, -966 
Olsen, A. H. 



790 



Parikka, 

Fearson, 

Podersen, 

Pedersen, 

I'edersen, 

Pederson, 

Pendville, 

Fercival, 

I'ersson, 

Petersen 

Petersen 



1 lerman 
John S. 
Louis 
-101)6 
Carl C. 
L. R. 
N. 

Wm. 
Chas. 
-645 
Bertel 



Kaahange, J. F. 
Hasmussen, -497 
Rasmussen, E. 
Keinhold, Ernst 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Rigoulot, Bert 
Hints, T. 
Roalsen, Fred E. 
Robett, John D. 
Sanchez, Vincent 
Sanders, Frank 
Sawberg, A. 
Senator, Paul 
Schmehl, Jas. P. 
Schmldlen. -1987 
Schmidt, Alfred 
Schmidt, Fritz 
Schultman, John 
Schumacher, Wm. 
Seegers, Wm. 
Semberg, John 
Shannon, H. C. 
Shifter, Chas. R. 
Sigurd, Gustaf 
Simpson, B. C. 
Sindahl, Jens 
Siven, Viktor 
Pivertsen, Geo. 
Sjogren, K. A. 
Tamm, A. 
Teitzen, B. H. 
Templeman, R. 
Thomal, -273 
Thomas, Frank 
Thomson, Hans 
Thoresen, Th. A. 
Bella. Ole 
Velss, -1107 
Virak, M. 

Von den Steene, J. 
Yongehr, Ewald 
Wahi. J. 

Waldo, Wm. 
Wahlberg, Rudolf 
Wasenius, Sigurd 
Wells, Geo. 
Westenberg, N. G. 
Westerlund, Paul 
Winters, C. J. 
Young, R. 
Zarnow, Otto 



Bukman, Ewald 

Lunde. Olaus M. 
Lundln, Chas. 
Lundin. A. 

McKenzle, John 
McKenzie, -1775 
McLean. John 
Melander, Gus. 
Mendiola, Joseph 
Mersman, A, 
Meyers, Herman 
Moller, Jens 
Mortimer, Ernst 
Murphy, Howard 

Nielsen, -S84 

Niisen. Fred 
Nilsen, Hans 
Niisen, -784 
Nilsson, Nat. 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norton, Jack R. 
Nyman, Gus 
Olsen. Olaf E. -59 
Olsen, Soren 
Olsen, Jorgen 
Olson. -717 
Olsson, Wm. 
OJsson, -945 

Pettersen, Carl 
I'ettersen, Jens O. 
Peterson, John 
Pllos, Louis 
Poison, Carl 
Porter, C. 
Pratt, Fred 
Pratt, Louis 
al. .lean 

Prinz, Chas. 

Rokenes, AnfVn 
Poll, August 
ROSCheck, Paul 
Rosenvald, Isak 
Rosenqvist, H. A. 
Rud, Louis 
Rudberg, C. 
Ryberg, Sverre 

Sjoblom, Anton 
Skyekan, M. 
Smith, John A. W. 
Soedstrup, E. 
Sola, Emanuel 
Sonora, Wm. 
Stack, Jacob 
Steen, H. D. 
Steffens, D. 
Steine, -2120 
Stone. Robert 
Strand, -1786 
Suamlnen, O. 
Sund, Alecks 
Sundman, Gus. 
Svendsen, -10"»0 
Svensson, Nik 
Swanson, J. 
Swanson, Hugo 
Swensen, Carl 
Thorn, Arvi.i 
Tjellman, Jonas 
Tofte, H. 
Torgenscn, Peter 
Treudle, Louie 
Tyson, Wm. W. 

Plstad. Kristian 
von Villemayor, \V. 
Vortmann, Wm. 
Vucic, V. 

Welsen, Julius 
Wikstrom. H. H. E. 
Wilde, Herman 
Wilson, Herman 
Winter, Gotthard 

Windier. Hans 
Wirak, Hugo 



Zebe, Gustav 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 

Allen, Fred Ingebretsen, Carl -69 

Andersen, Carl -1537 Kelly, John 
Anderson, Albert B. Kloot. J. 

-1568 Kolp, Otto Bouis 

Anderson, Martin Kruger, Gustav 

-38 Lowe, John A. 

Barnard, C. Madsen, G. F. -1677 

Benson, Fred McDonough, Ed. 

Blumer, Mase McFarlane 

Brooker, F. Molen, D. V. D. 

Carlson, Chas. 1087 Nilson, Alf. 



Cottin, Albert 
Eklund, Aug. 
Eliasen, Carl 
Guyader, Georges 
Haltnes, Magnus 
Johanson, K. 
-1396 



Olsen, Martin 
Olsen, Carl -908 
Petersen, Chas. -472 
Lundquist, Walter 
W. 
J Webber, John 
Weilsen, Alfred 



Honolulu, H. T. Letter List. 

Andersen, F. C. Ferraris, J. 

Andersen, A. B. Holm, J. 

Andersen, Einar Janssen, II. -1555 

Clahsen, H. Helinor, Belin J. 

Campbell, N. Thomas, J. W. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Bonnquist, Ossian 
Larch, Paul 
Bindholm, A. 
Bundquist, Fred 
Meijer, O. W. G. 



Anderson, Carl 

Andersson, J. S. 

Aeckerle, E. 

Bagdon, W. 

i El rtbelsen, Alfred 

Berghold, Hermann Madsen, -1677 

Coye, Chas. Nelson, Johan 

christoffersen, Olaf Newman n, Curt 

Espensen, Espen N.Olsen. Osvald 

Fjelstad, John Osvald, T. 

Gunther, Hans Olson, John 



Holmes, T. A. 
Hartman, Chas. 
Hollins, Frank 
Holmberg, O. B. 
Kassall, S. G. 
Jensen, Peter 



Osol, Theo. K. 
Petersen, William 
Peterson, Nicolai 

-1286 
Petersen, Frank 
Sollen, Be 



Jensen, Hans, -1826 Schmidt, Alfred 
•lahnke, Arthur Shallow, John 

insen, H., -2126Schultz. Axel 
.lohannesen, -1441 Sjostrom, T. E. 



lohnson, C. A. 
Knudsen, Peder 
Kone. Ernest 
Kreman, Martin 
Knutson, A. 
Koch, Carl 



Saar, Hans 
Stenzel. Walter Otto 
Teigland. T. 
Tupitz, Con 
Wlnche, August 
Yates, James 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 

Andersen, Hjalmar Karvonen, Lars 
Asker. S. J. Le Fort, Guervls 

Hoffman, Tom Moberg, Alf. 

Henriksson, G. H. Williams, Chas. 
Jensen, Ingwald M. Wilson, Herman 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Andersen, A. C.-1108 Heller. Olaf 
Carnaghan, Wm. Johansen, A. -1705 
Fasig, Don. Schmehl, J. P. 

Larsen, Bars Thomson, Carl 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Nils. 
Anderson, Axel. 
Andersson, -907 
Andersson, -1447 
Bertelsen, -1223 
Boysen, P. A. 
Carlson, Beo 



Morris, L. 
Markham, n. 

.Malison. \Y. 
Maibohm, 11. 
Nilson, Karl 
Ollgreen, K. 
Olsen, E. -515 



Chrlstensen, AndersPettersen, -1154 
Christensen, -17S Petterson, -1037 



Carlson, K. E. 

Emanuelsen, A. 
Eliasen, E. 
Ellingsen, J. 
Foster, O. 
Hope, Ole 



Rytko, O. -Tin 
Raymond, L. 

Squill's, E. 

Smith, J. C. 
Swenson, Pen 
Stender, A. 



Hendricksen, H. R. Storvlck, l 
Hansen, Bars. Saar, II. 

Johannesen, M. E. Solberg, O, 



Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Nils 
Jalonen, J. 
Kjellgreen, A. B. 
Ban, G. 
Liliebeck, C. 
Lewis, J. M. 
Lunder, B. 
Le Gome, W. 



Simon, A. 
Utby, Carl 
Vongher, E. 
Y'iereck, II. 
Westburn, T. 
Weekauf, n. 

r, E. 

Well, l. 
Westergren, Ch. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Anderson, Olaf 
Anderson, S. 
Armml, Walter 
Bastrom, C. 
Christensen, E. H. 
Gustafson, Edward 
Gunther, Theo. 
Isaacson. Gustave 
Johnsen, J. -25 
Karlsson, E. 
Knudsen, Jacob E. 
Larsen, M. 
Lorensen, O. C. 
Mlcheli, Agagtlna 



Mettemeijer, J. F. 
Moersmand, Gastan 

Niccolie, Sant. 
Niisen, Ruder 
Nyland, Sven 
Oman, Victor 
Plattner, Fred 
Pateejanske. R. 
Shuels, Christ. 
Skutul. A. 
Simpson, Lewis C. 
Svensen, Olaf 
Teigland, G. 
Thortensen. Peter 



David Rosenthal and David Selwin, 
natives of New Orleans, are inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Gustaf Gilberg, a seaman, is in- 
quired for by his sister. Address, 
Mrs. James R. Sederquist, 9 Wash- 
ington Square, Lynn, Mass. 

Mrs. C. E. Corlett, of Cheboygan, 
Michigan, inquires for her son, Rob- 
ert Corlett, No. 16,672, Lake Sea- 
men's Union. 

Reier Gunderson is inquired for by 
his brother, Borre Christian Gunder- 
son. Address Sailors' Union, 44-46 
East street, San Francisco. 

Roy Person, No. 12522, L. S. U., is 
inquired for by his sister, Hazel Per- 
son, Alpena, Mich.; A. B. Flinn, No. 
18688, L. S. U., is inquired for by his 
brother, David Flinn, 275 Southamp- 
ton street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native of 
Kalmar, Sweden, born September 15, 
1881, supposed to be sailing on the 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
sisters and parents. Address, Klaes 
Swensson, Sodra Lauggatan No. 26, 
Kalmar, Sweden. 



MSS^'HOAJ) 



OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

iAN FRANCISCO . NEW YORK PORTLAND 



DEMAND the BRAND 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,453,983.62 

Deposits, June 30, 1908 34,474,554.23 

Total Assets 37,055,263.31 

Remittances may be made by Draft, 
Post Office, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 
o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 7 
o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. for receipt 
of deposits only. 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 

THE HARRISON 

Newly furnished rooms. 

456 HARRISON ST., Corner First, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Hot and cold running water in 
every room; electric lighted and free 
baths. Terms $1.50 per week up. 

Hotel Santa Fe 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bell, and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 

HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



Badges, Banners, Regalia, Robes, 

Lapel Buttons 

Briefs, Constitutions and By-Laws, 

and Souvenirs, at 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 

391 Jessie St., San Francisco. 

Phone Kearny 1966 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. f. 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 
E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 
East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 109 Steaart St. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 

CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



SOMETHING NEW 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE NICOTINE DESTROYER. 

"ANTIDOTE," the Catalytic Pipe has Four 
Important Advantages which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

_ 1. The "ANTIDOTE" needs No Break- 
ing in. Every smoker knows the terrors 
of the first few smokes in an ordinary 
Pipe. The First Smoke in an "ANTI 
DOTE" is as sweet as an ordinary 
Pipe sweetened by Long Usage. 

2. The "ANTIDOTE" can not 
burn out. The Catalytic lining pro- 
tects the briar. 

3. The "ANTIDOTE" is always 
Dry even with constant smoking 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scien- 
tifically destroys the Nicotine, 
making it evaporate. A por- 
ous lining filled with Coal Tar 
Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 




placed in 
the bowl 
of a briar 
pipe, this is 
called the 
Catalyser; the 
smoke passing 
over the C a t a. 
1 y s e r produces 
Formol. This For- 
mol turns all the 
moisture and Nico- 
tine into steam, caus- 
ing it to pass off into 
the air and evaporate. 
All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes 
are hand made, of the 
Best French Briar. 

KASSER BROS. 

Distributors 
19 MARKET STREET 
S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 
Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 



Buy Your 

Clothing, Hats 
and Shoes 

From 

C. J. SWANSON 

Oilskins, Rubberboots, Suit- 
cases, Trunks, Valises, 
Bedding, Pillows and 
Blankets 

STYLISH GOODS 
LOW PRICES 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

119 EAST ST. 

Between Washington and 
Merchant Streets 

San Francisco 
Suits Made to Order. 




INFORMATION WANTED. 



Wilhelm Schumacher, a native of 
Duisburg-Ruhrort, Germany, is in 
quired for by the German Consul, 51 
Third street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific is 
inquired for by his father. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



LVNDSTROM HATS 

5 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 



News from Abroad. 



It is reported that the Chinese boy- 
cott against Japan will shortly be 
formally declared off. 

Sir George Truscott was elected 
Lord Mayor of London, on Septem- 
ber 29, in succession to Sir John 
Charles Bell. 

A meeting of 300,000 persons, held 
in Hyde Park, London, on September 
27, protested against the passage of 
the Licensing bill. 

Advices received at Lisbon stale 
that the bubonic plague is increasing 
at an alarming rate at Terceira, one 
of the Azores Islands. 

It has been learned in Lisbon that 
both Portuguese Republicans and 
Monarchists are arming, and that a 
general outbreak is threatened. 

The United States battleships 
Maine and Alabama sailed from Gib- 
raltar on October 4 for Horta, capi- 
tal of the Island of Fayal, Azores 
Islands. 

Under the new compulsory military 
training defense scheme it is esti- 
mated that in eight years Australia 
will have 214,000 men trained and 
equipped for war. 

It is believed that Japan will with- 
draw a large portion of the Japanese 
troops now stationed in North China, 
leaving only a small number at Peking 
and Tien-tsin. 

France has joined with other 
powers in protesting against Bul- 
garia's continued occupation of that 
part of the Orient Railway which is 
located in Roumelia. 

A warehouse stocked with arms for 
the revolutionists has been located at 
Tiflis, Russia. The police seized sev- 
eral tons of explosives, stacks and 
cases of rifles and pistols and 150 
primed bombs. 

The Austrian Government is is- 
suing repeated warnings against the 
emigration of its subjects to America, 
and particularly to Pennsylvania, in 
which State labor conditions are re- 
ported as being bad. 

The tunnel through the backbone of 
the Cordilleras that will connect Val- 
paraiso with Buenos Ayres is pro- 
gressing rapidly. Work is pushed day 
and night. At the present rate of 
progress it will be open in 1910. 

Two trains on the Berlin Elevated 
Railroad collided on September 26. 
Eighteen persons were killed, eight 
seriously and many others slightly in- 
jured. Most of the deaths resulted 
from contact with the electrified rails. 

Agitators at Amoy, China, have 
been circulating a report to the effect 
that the United States battleship fleet, 
which will visit that port the end of 
October, purposes to seize Amoy as a 
base of operations in a forthcoming 
war against Japan. 

The cholera epidemic at St. Peters- 
burg, Russia, is being kept well in 
hand, considering the hold it had on 
the city before proper measures to 
prevent its spread were taken. In the 
twenty-four hours from noon on Oc- 
tober 3 until noon on the 4th, the new 
cases numbered 136 and the deaths 62. 

Recent developments indicate the 
danger of a war in Europe, due to the 
proclamation by Prime Ferdinand of 
Bulgaria of the independence of that 
country, which will include Roumelia, 
taking for himself the title of Czar, 
and the announcement by Austria- 
Hungary of the practical annexation 
of the provinces of Bosnia and Herze- 
govina as appendages of the Austro- 
Ilungarian crown. 



16 



C( iAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



The Clarion of Victory.— Mrs. Rail 
fence (at the supper table I -"Th 
an auttymobile horn a -tootin' like 
mad." Mr. Railfence— "Darn 'em! 
Must 'a' killed a cow tew be crowin' 
about it that much!"— Puck. 



Environment.—"] suppose," said the 
to its nurse, "thai my 
inclination at present is due to the in- 
fluence of heredity." 

"In what way do your inclination- 
tend?" asked the nurse, politely. 

"I want." said the Society Baby, "to 
give a bawl." — Baltimore American. 



"I'm in a diffi- 



Rash Compliments 
culty over my girl." 

"What's wrong?" 

"I've been saying such nice things 
to her that she's getting conceited. 
If I quit she'll think I don't care for 
her any longer, and if I go on she'll 
think she's too good for me."— Puck. 



A Triumph in Science.— Biggums— 

"They tell me Professor Hopkins has 
at last perfected his airship." 

Sniggums — "He has. There are- 
only two things left to complete." 
Biggums — "What are they?" 
Sniggums— "Hopkins says it'll be 
great if he can only make it stay up 
and go ahead." — New York Globe. 



Not So Advanced. — Mrs. Johnson — 
"So you are 8 years old, Mary?" 

Mary — "Yes. ma'am, and I will soon 
be 9, too." 

Mrs. Johnson— "Well. Mary, how 
old do you suppose I am." 

Mary — "I don't know, ma'am; you 
see, I'm only in the first grade and 
we haven't gotten that far in arith- 
metic." — Florida Times-Union. 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Affiliated with 

THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 

Authorized Capital (Combined) $800,000.00 

Capital and Surplus 385,000.00 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

CHAS. NELSON, President HENRY WILSON 

LEWIS I. COWGIIiL, Vice-President ALBERT SUTTON 

L. M. MacDONAJL-D, Cashier C. S. WRIGHT 

J. C. BSCHEN W. H. LITTLE 

4% interest paid on Savings DeposltB. 
Money transmitted to all parts of the world at lowest rates. 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 
THH 

United States Nautical College. • 

CAPT. J. G. HITCH FIELD - Principal 

The oldest navigation school on the 
• Coast (established 1875) offers you 
advantages that can not be obtained else- 
where. 

Our methods are short, thorough, con- 
cise and practical; the prices are moder- 
ate, and you are assured of a "square 
deal." 

HOTEL MOHAWK 

EAST STREET - - San Francisco 

Good accommodation for students. 



Willing to Oblige. — "When you 
feels any temptations comin' along," 
said the friend and adviser, "you mils' 
say, 'Get thee behin' me, Satan.' " 

"Da's what I done said." answered 
Mr. Erastus Pinkley, "an' den I 'mag- 
ines 1 hyuhs Satan answer me back: 
'Da's all right. We's both gwiiu de 
same way nohow an' it don' make no 
diffunce to me which leads de puh- 
cession.' " — Washington Star. 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

No. A MISSION ST., near East, SAN FRANCISCO 



Hand Tailored 
Union Made 

Suits \ $12.50 
Overcoats > to 
Raincoats ) $25.00 

Wallenstein & Frost 
824 Market St. 

Opposite 4th St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



J. COHEN & CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
Boss of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



HUMBOLDT MEN No. 2 

Did you ever notice on Saturday 
evening between 6 and 8 o'clock the 
busy throng entering and leaving this 
bank? 

These are Humboldt men; they save 
a portion of their wages or profits 
each week. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

You can open a savings account with 

one dollar. Interest paid on 

savings accounts. 




K Most Reliable Jewelry House C 
SORENSEIN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

RELIABLE JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

SPECTACLES FITTED, EYES EXAMINED FREE 

Main Store 715 MARKET ST., near Call Building. 

Branch Store, 2593 Mission St., near Twenty-second. 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for 2 Year» 



S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



The James It 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



J0HNJ.BAGLEY&C0. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturers 

PIPE TOBACCOS 

Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 

3P ~oIum(I iytttAutSaifii ol tin <~~ og 

| TMUOi WatWEU ^^SSSSh. IHTEWIKnOHAL | UINIOIN 




The Most Thorough and the Best Equipped Nautical School in San Francisco 

VON SCHOEN'S 

Navigation School 



SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE 



242 Steuart St., near Folsom 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Francisco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits 
a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
m>t make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 1888 

510 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Largest and best equipped private Nautical School on the Continent of 
America. 

Henry Taylor (Attorney and Counsellor at Law), Lecturer in Naviga- 
tion and Maritime Law. 

WILLIAM B. PAGE, Class Instructor. 



Capt. Christensen's 



School of 
Navigation 



82 Market St., Room 23 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 

Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXII, No. 4. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1908. 


Whole No. 1086. 





A. F. OF L. IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGN. 



THE FOLLOWING report of the measures 
taken by the American Federation of Labor 
in the present political campaign was sub- 
mitted to the Executive Council of that body on 
September 10 and approved by the latter: 
To All Organized Labor: 

The undersigned, the Executive Council of the 
American Federation of Labor, in session at 
Washington, D. C, September 9-13, had submit- 
ted to us, and we unanimously approved and in- 
dorsed the following report of the Labor Repre- 
sentation Committee, and which we urge every 
worker and friend to read, and take such action 
as will most effectually carry the same into effect: 

Labor Representation Committee's Report. 
Washington, D. C, September 10, 1908. 
To the Executive Council of the American Fede- 
ration of Labor: 
Colleagues: The undersigned Labor Represen- 
tation Committee selected by you to conduct the 
political activities of the organized efforts of the 
workers in the present political campaign to at- 
tain the legislative relief and remedy as outlined 
by the Minneapolis and Norfolk Conventions of 
the American Federation of Labor; by the great 
conference of the responsible officers and other 
representatives of International Unions, held at 
Washington, D. C, March, 1908, and the direc- 
tions given by you at our several meetings, begs 
leave to submit the following: We have held sev- 
eral meetings to consider and act upon the many 
matters committed to us, and those which from 
time to time have arisen. 

We directed to be published in the August issue 
of the American Federationist the report of the 
A. F. of L. Legislative Committee submitted to 
and approved by the Executive Council. That 
report particularly recounted the failure of Con- 
gress to pass the legislation necessary to restore 
and safeguard the normal activities of organized 
labor's existence, as denied now by the decision 
of the United States Supreme Court, by holding 
that the unions of workers come under the Sher- 
man Anti-Trust Law, are trusts, conspiracies, or 
combinations in illegal restraint of trade, render- 
ing members of the voluntary organizations of 
labor liable to threefold damages and prosecu- 
tions involving fines of $5,000 and imprisonment 
for one year. Also the failure of Congress to 
consider, much less enact, any bill to secure 
the workers the constitutional guarantee of equal- 
ity before the law by remedying the abuse and 
perversion of the injunction process. 

We issued the circular to all organized labor 
as directed by you setting forth the identical 
planks which we urged the Republican and Demo- 
cratic Party Conventions to incorporate in their 
respective platforms; the declarations which both 
parties incorporated and the treatment accorded 
the Executive Council by both parties. 

We have sent organizers into the Danville, 111., 
Congressional district (Speaker Cannon's district) 
and into a number of other Congressional dis- 
tricts, carrying out the policy of the American 
labor movement as directed by the conventions 
at Minneapolis and Norfolk, by the Washington 
Labor Conference, by this Executive Council, and 
by the great mass-meetings held throughout the 
country April 19-20. 



We desire to call attention to the fact that a 
number of conspicuous opponents, both in the 
United States Senate and in the House of Repre- 
sentatives, have been defeated for renomination 
through the activity inaugurated by us and by 
our fellow unionists in their respective States or 
districts, and, further, that a number of union men 
have been nominated for Congress and it is our 
purpose to render them every aid within our 
power to secure their election. 

It is our purpose, to the full extent of our 
financial resources, to appoint a number of or- 
ganizers and print such literature as deals with 
the primary and important interests of labor. 
Incident thereto, we have issued a supplementary 
appeal for financial assistance to the one issued 
a few months ago requesting voluntary financial 
contributions. 

In addition to the funds already contributed, 
we recommended that another appeal be issued 
to secure financial means to further the election 
of men favorable to achieving the justice, rights, 
and equality before the law, to which the toilers 
are entitled; and to defeat such candidates who 
are indifferent or hostile to such legislative relief. 
We shall, in the future, as we have in the past, 
shape our course upon a nonpartisan basis. We 
have judged and proposed to judge candidates for 
any office upon their records and attitude and not 
because of their political party affiliation, and the 
funds obtained by previous, as well as to be ob- 
tained by the proposed, circular have been and 
will be used for general purposes as herein set 
forth and not for partisan purposes. 

We have had a number of officers of interna- 
tional unions offer their services, as well as the 
services of organizers, to help both in organizing 
work, and, particularly at this time, in the fur- 
therance of Labor's political compaign. We 
would recommend that officers of international 
unions be communicated with further for the pur- 
pose of placing organizers at our disposal to help 
further in this work to promote the general and 
specific interests of labor. 

We also recommend that a request be made to 
the executive officers of National and Interna- 
tional organizations affiliated to the American 
Federation of Labor, and other friendly associa- 
tions, to issue immediately a circular to their 
respective organizations urging compliance with 
provisions of this document. 

Attention is called to the symposium articles 
published in the September issue of the American 
Federationist on Labor's Political Duty at this 
time, and also the resolutions adopted by the con- 
ventions of International Unions, by the City 
Central Bodies, as well as expressions of some 
of the most active men in the labor movement 
of our country. They all show, as do the reports 
from our fellow workers throughout the United 
Stoics, that there is an unanimity of sentiment 
and determination to fully carry out the policy 
declared by the organized labor movement, not 
only in the conventions of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, the International Union conven- 
tions, the State Federations, the City Central 
Bodies, but also in the local unions composed of 
1 he great rank of the organized workers of our 
Ci mntry. 

We desire to refute here the aspersions that 
have been cast upon the Executive Council and 
particularly one of its members, President Gomp- 



ers, that it is our purpose, or his, to dictate to 
the working people of our country how they 
should cast their votes in the coming elections, 
nor has any one promised the vote of the work- 
ing people to any particular party. We have 
strongly, clearly, and emphatically, as it was our 
duty, presented the situation in which the work- 
ing people of the country find themselves, the 
demands which Labor has made upon both politi- 
cal parties as to necessary action which they 
should take, the treatment they have received, 
and have appealed to the judgment and patriot- 
ism of the working people and the friends of 
labor throughout the country, since both political 
parties have spoken, to make their choice as their 
conscience may dictate. 

The misrepresentation of newspapers and oth- 
ers to the contrary notwithstanding, we repeat 
and insist, and we have so conducted and pro- 
pose to so conduct our course, that the labor 
movement shall remain as free and independent 
from political partisan domination as it has ever 
been in its history. 

You, as an Executive Council, and we as your 
Labor Representation Committee, have endeav- 
ored to carry into effect the declared policy of 
the great rank and file of the toilers. The con- 
ventions of the American Federation of Labor 
have time and time again declared that there is 
no tendency so dangerous to personal liberty, 
so destructive to free institutions and of a re- 
publican form of government as the present mis- 
use and extension of the equity power through 
the usurpation by the Judiciary * * * that can- 
didates for office "be carefully investigated as to 
their acts and interrogated as to their position 
on this matter before they be given any support, 
and that those, who from their actions or their 
expressions arc deemed unsound, he, regardless 
of any other question, repudiated." and organized 
labor's further declaration, when the great con 
ference at Washington and the mass -meetings 
throughout the country were held that we now 
call upon the workers of our common country to 
stand faithfully by our friends, oppose and de- 
feat our enemies, whether they be candidates 
for President, for Congress, or other offices, 
whether executive, legislative, or judicial. 

Fraternally yours, 

S WIUFI. GOMPERS, 
JAMES O'CONNELL, 
FRANK MORRISON, 
Labor Representation Committee, American Fed 
eration of Labor. 

The present situation in which the work- 
our country are placed by reason of the decision 
of the Supreme Court of the United Slates by 
which the normal activities of Labor's associated 
efforts arc jeopardized and made unlawful, and 
the men constituting the rank and file of our 
movement threatened with civil suits, as well as 
persecution under the terms of the Sherman Anti- 
Trust law; the perversion, the abuse, and misdi 
rection of the writ of injunction, under which 
many men throughout the country, including 

Samuel (! pel . John Mitchell, and Frank M 

rison, have cither been sent to jail or are now 
threatened with, and undergoing proceedings by 
which they may be sent to jail, demands that 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



every worker and citizen at this crucial time 
should know the facts and do his duty. 

We appeal to the officers of the National and 
International Unions to give not only their own 
personal service, hut to place such organizers as 
they can at the disposal of the Labor Represen- 
tation Committee, that such National officers issue 
a special appeal to their local unions and lodges 
to the end that voluntary contributions of financial 
assistance he made by the workers to aid in 
carrying into effect Labor's declared policy "TO 
STAND FAITHFULLY BY OUR FRIENDS, 
OPPOSE AND DEFEAT OUR ENEMIES, 
WHETHER THEY BE CANDIDATES FOR 
PRESIDENT, OR CONGRESS, OR OTHER 
OFFICES, WHETHER EXECUTIVE, LEGIS- 
LATIVE ( )k JUDICIAL." 

We appeal to all the labor and reform press of 
the country to aid in this duty of the hour, and 
to all workers and friends to rise to the occasion 
which the exigencies of the time demand to the 
end that the voluntary organizations of labor, 
which have done and are doing SO much to main- 
tain the American standard of life, to sustain 
l he American ideal of home, the American sense 
of equality and justice before the law. shall nol he 
outlawed, crippled, or destroyed, and that the 
men of labor, the yeomanry of our Republic's 
welfare and perpetuity, shall be sustained in their 
determination to stand as the vanguard and de- 
fender- .if personal rights and human liberty. 

cious of tlie nobility of our movement, the 
honorable aspirations of our cause, and the tri- 
umph of justice and right, with high resolve, we 
submit our cause and our appeal to the judgment 
anil conscience of our fellow workers and our 
fellow citizens. 

Fraternally yours, 

Vttesl : 

SAMUEL GOMPERS, 

President. 
FRANK MORRISON. 

Secretary. 

James Duncan, First Vice-President; John 
Mitchell, Second Vice President; James O'Con- 
ii.ll. Third Vice-President; Max Morris, Fourth 
Vice President; I >. A. Hayes, Fifth Vice-Presi- 
dent; Daniel J. Kecfe. Sixth Vice-President; Win. 
I). Iluber. Seventh Vice-President; Jos. F. Val 
entitle, Eighth Vice-President; John 11. Lennon, 
Treasurer, Executive Council American Federa 
tiou of Labor. 



LIFE IN THE ARCTIC. 



Spitzbergen is one of the few Arctic lands 
where no evidence has been discovered that 
it was ever inhabited by the Esquimaux or 
other boreal tribes. In the progress of 
events, however, it seems destined in future 
to have a permanent white population. It 
was the home last winter of 200 white men, 
some of them whalers and more coal 
miners, who shared a common settlement 
on the shore of a dee]) indentation of the 
wot coast. Nearly all of the isolated colony 
are natives of Norway, not a few of whom 
had spent the previous two winters on the 
edge of their coal field, though the settle- 
ment last winter was nearly double its for- 
mer size. 

For the first time last winter women lived 
in these snow-covered huts, sharing with 
their husbands the monotony of the long 
night. The hardy peasant women said that 
they would rather have some semblance of 
their family life among the glaciers of the 
frigid island than remain grass-widowed 
in civilized Norway. So their sphere of 
domesticity was transferred to the rude huts 
on an Arctic shore, and no doubt the bleak 
winter time was more comfortable and 
pleasant because of their presence. There 
was no death in the little colony and the 
population was increased by the birth of 
two babies. 

The output of coal at these mines is in- 
creasing every year, and in 1906 several 
shiploads were sent to Norway. The fish- 
ing industry is growing in importance also 
since ships and crews resumed the practice, 
discontinued more than two centuries ago, of 
remaining all winter in order to secure 
cargoes of oil early in the season. 

The interesting project of Knud Rasm US- 
sen and his twenty-year-old sister, YVilhcl- 



mine, illustrates the fact that the terrors of 
Arctic travel have disappeared in great 
measure now that all the conditions and 
the means to meet them have been thor- 
oughly studied. Rasmussen is a Danish 
ethnologist, who, with his sister, has been 
spending the winter at Umanak, in Danish 
Greenland, not far from the island of Drisco. 
If all has gone well we shall hear next fall 
that tin two started seven months ago on a 
journey of nearly a thousand miles along 
the west coast to Cape York and the Smith 
Sound natives, among whom they propose 
to live until Rasmussen has made a thor- 
ough study of these most isolated of human 
beings. They expect to live in the native 
huts and establish relations of mutual 
friendliness and confidence with these most 
northern inhabitants of the world so that 
they may learn all phases of their lives. 
Rasmussen is an expert in his line, and if 
he is able to complete his undertaking the 
results will undoubtedly be valuable. 

The route he will travel leads along or 
near the coast of Melville Bay, for many 
years the longest unknown stretch of the 
west coast of Greenland till Peary surveyed 
a large part of it. 

Rasmussen's plans of travel would have 
been regarded a few years ago as foolhardy. 
and even now they appear very audacious. 
On the return journey he proposes to he 
landed on Baffin Land, part of the coast of 
which has not yet been outlined, and with 
dog sleds to traverse the island, one of the 
largest in the world, from north to south, 
finally reaching the settlements in Labra- 
dor or Ungava Bay, in Hudson Strait. 

The phases of Arctic work mentioned here 
have elements of novelty and show the in- 
fluence of the experience gained during the 
last fifteen years of great activity in far 
northern research. — New York Sun. 



PORT OF DURBAN. 



Improvements in the harbor at Durban, 
Natal, have been noted and attention called 
to the excellent facilities offered for the 
handling of cargo and the coaling of vessels. 
As a coaling station Durban is of growing 
importance, and it has been the endeavor of 
the port department not to permit her tran- 
sit trade to diminish because of any want 
in facilities given. The average low-water 
depth at the harbor entrance was increased 
to 32 2-3 feet. Four 60-hundred-weight 
hydraulic cranes and two hydraulic cap- 
stans for moving wagons were added to the 
port equipment. The coaling appliances 
were put into operation during the first half 
of the year and have greatly facilitated coal- 
ing. 

The total tonnage trade of the port for 
I'M 17 was 1.620.956 tons, of which 482,337 
tons, value $37,64N,55N, were imports and 
1,138,619 tons exports. Coal constitutes the 
principal export, 991,255 tons, value $3,917,- 
532. being exported, while other merchan- 
dise only totaled 147,364 tons. The total 
trade for 1906 was 1,354,192 tons, the im- 
ports being 563,158 tons, the export of coal 
703.870 tons, and of other cargo 87,164 tons. 



The tunnel through the backbone of the 
Cordilleras that will connect Valparaiso with 
Buenos Aires is progressing rapidly. Work- 
is pushed clay and night. At the present 
rale iif progress it will In- opened in 1910. 



AUSTRALIA AND THE FLEET. 



The Australian view of the meaning of 
the visit of the American fleet was made 
evident within a few hours of the receipt 
of the acceptance of Deakin's invitation. 
People shouted themselves hoarse with joy 
at public meitings, and all parly and per- 
sonal differences were fused in the one 
thought that Australia's cry for physical 
and moral support in the impending death 
struggle of conflicting races for supremacy 
in the Pacific had been heard and answered. 

The feelings of Australians, however, 
touch greater depths than those of vanity 
and self-esteem in this matter. The men 
who guide and govern peer anxiously into 
the future to a time when the Anglo-Japa- 
nese treaty will either be no more or will be 
profoundly modified. They fancy they see 
a stage ahead in which the yellow races of 
their northern and eastern coasts will deem 
the moment for aggression has come. They 
imagine a set of circumstances in which 
their ancient mother in Europe will require 
every battleship at her call for her own pro- 
tection and the defense of her food supplies. 
They forecast the creation of a navy of their 
own which, though powerful, will be but 
as a walnut between relentless nutcrackers 
when Asiatic fleets assail it. "And," they 
say to themselves, "to whom shall we look 
for aid? On whom shall we lean? With 
whom can we co-operate when this dire ex- 
tremity i> reached? On whom, indeed, hut 
the United States <>t~ America?" This, after 
all, is the heart of the whole business. 

\s one of the most influential of demo- 
cratic organs of the Commonwealth says: 
"Deakin's hospitable message was in the in- 
most sense an invitation to the people of 
America to admit the common trust of the 
two white races whose destinies are bound 
up in Pacific dominance. Its acceptance 
implies a full confession of that trust, and 
conveys an intimation that America is pre- 
pared to perform her part." 

Australians are prepared to rise to the 
standard which their prevision of the future 
thrusts upon them. They have made it]) 
their minds that if they are to keep what 
they have got they must defend it them- 
selves with their own army, their own navy, 
and their own officers. If Australia is to 
be worthy of being ranked as the friend and 
potential ally of America in the Pacific she 
must have a fleet which, whether small or 
great, can be localized definitely on the 
Pacific for the defense of Australia. — Lon- 
don Chronicle. 



CO-OPERATION IN GERMANY. 



The Grosseinkaufsgesellschaft dcutscher 
Konsumvereine G. m. b. II. (Wholesale 
Purchasing Company for German Co-opera- 
tive Associations, Limited) at Hamburg, 
Germany, has published its report on the 
company's business during 1907. The to- 
tal sales amounted to $14,254,000, an in- 
crease of 28.7 per cent over the business of 
1906. The capital of the concern (which 
only supplies its affiliated co-operative re- 
tail stores) is $239,000. The net profits 
from last year's dealings amounted to $120,- 
000. The report states that the prospects 
for 1908 are not auspicious, because the 
present economic crisis will cause lack of 
employment for factory operatives and 
other working classes. 









COAST SEAMEN'S TOURNAL. 



^5*^* 



On the Atlantic Coast. 

(Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions.) 



*^^* 



MAKING A NEW SEAPORT. 



The works which have in late years been 
carried on toward the improvement of the 
Terneuzen Canal are advancing rapidly, and 
the canal connecting Ghent with the North 
Sea will be completed about the beginning 
of next year. On Dutch territory the work 
has lately been pushed with great activity, 
so that the greater part thereof is completed. 
The last contract for deepening and improv- 
ing the harbor of Terneuzen, the Dutch end 
of the canal, was signed and passed by the 
Dutch authorities December 18, 1907, and 
provided that within 300 days the new mari- 
time lock at Terneuzen, fitted with machin- 
ery permitting the temporary working there- 
of by hand, be opened to vessels. When this 
lock- is completed it will be worked by elec- 
tricity. The existing locks permit the pass- 
ing through into the Terneuzen Canal of 
vessels of not more than seventeen feet 
draft, while the new lock will permit the 
safe passage of vessels of twenty-five feet. 

The dimensions of the new lock will be 
459 feet long, 59 feet wide and 17 feet deep 
at low tide. The bridges on the canal will 
be opened and closed by electricity, while 
the total of twenty miles separating the 
port of Ghent from the sea will be fitted with 
electric arc lights placed at intervals of 490 
feet. The narrowest part of the canal is 
220 feet at the surface of the water and 
seventy-eight feet at the bottom. The depth 
is twenty-eight and one-half feet. 

The length of the canal improved will be 
twenty miles — ten and one-half miles on 
Belgian territory and nine and one-half miles 
on Dutch territory. The total width over 
water line on Belgian territory will be 318 
feet, while at the bottom the width will be 
seventy-eight feet, with a depth of twenty- 
eight and one-half feet. The width over 
water line on Dutch territory will be 220 
feet, with seventy-eight and one-half feet at 
the bottom and same depth. 

Commercial docks will be provided with 
wharfage facilities of a total length of 5250 
feet, with nine sheds. The depth varies from 
seventeen to twenty-one feet. Lumber docks 
will have 919 feet of wharfage, 278 feet wide, 
with three sheds covering 83,292 square feet. 
The "foreharbor" will have 7215 feet wharf- 
age, 295 feet wide, and a depth of twenty-one 
feet. 

The Terneuzen Canal when completed 
will permit the safe entry of large transat- 
lantic cargo boats. The city authorities are 
informed that as soon as the improvements 
are completed a new line of steamers will 
ply from Ghent to Galveston. 



DEWEY IN THE HURRICANE. 



A new three-masted schooner to be named 
the Frank B. Witherbee, is being built at 
the Bowker company's shipyard at Phipps- 
burg, Me., for the Horace M. Bickford Lum- 
ber Company, of Boston. The Witherbee 
will be of practically the same dimensions 
and tonnage as the Horace M. Bickford, 
launched several months ago, and, like the 
latter, will engage in the general coasting 
trade. 



During the West Indian hurricane that 
played havoc with scores of vessels in the 
Caribbean, the wind blew at times 120 miles 
an hour, declared Captain Asa Davison, of 
the United Fruit steamer Admiral Dewey, 
that reached Long Wharf, Boston, recently. 
The Dewey caught the full violence of the 
blow, and, as she was three days late in ar- 
riving in Jamaica, there was some uneasi- 
ness for her safety. 

The steamer was off Watlings when the 
storm hit her. Captain Davison edged his 
way 147 miles to the eastward, where there 
was plenty of sea room, to ride out the 
storm. There he hove to, and there the 
Dewey stayed for fifty-one hours, when the 
fearful cyclone moderated enough to war- 
rant a continuation of the voyage. The 
Dewey was about the only one of the fleet 
of fruiters that caught the storm to escape 
all damage. 

The Dewey exchanged signals with the 
Bath-built full-rigger Dirigo, Captain Good- 
rich,, bound from Honolulu for Delaware 
Breakwater, with sugar. She had been out 
four months, and her skipper reported all 
well aboard. 

Among the passengers brought by the 
Dewey were Austin C. Shaw of Muskegon, 
Mich., and Martin Nicholson of Duluth, fore- 
men in the engineers' department of the 
Panama Canal. 

Mr. Shaw said the sanitary conditions are 
excellent and comfortable quarters are pro- 
vided for every man in the Government 
service. He said the hospitals there are 
among - the finest in the world. 



"EQUINOCTIAL" STORMS. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



If the people of Philadelphia should hap- 
pily awaken this morning to find it storming, 
or if indeed a good rain should set in at any 
time within the next week- or ten days — 
which is likely enough to be the case — there 
are thousands of them who will with un- 
varying faith hail it as the "equinoctial," and 
in the face of the conclusions of modern 
meteorological science that changes of the 
moon and the passage of the sun "across the 
equator" have nothing whatever to do with 
the weather at any particular spot on the 
earth's surface, will regard it as another con- 
firmation of traditional superstitions con- 
cerning "line" storms. A search of the 
weather records will reveal the fact that the 
day which marks the separation of the sea- 
sons and on which the sun "souths" exactly 
at noon is more likely than not to be cleaer 
and beautiful, but with the latitude that the 
amateur weather prophets of the past always 
allowed themselves for safety's sake, any 
storm occurring within several days before 
or after the time of equal day and night has 
been held to be either an early or a belated 
coming of the inevitable "line" storm. 

A very little thought on the area of the 
habited portions of the earth and the known 
causes of storms should convince those who 
are willing to be convinced that the "equi- 
noctial" is a superstition and a myth. In the 
case of our own locality — using the word in 
the broadest sense — it is only on rare occa- 



sions that the meteorological disturbances 
from the region of the Great Lakes and 
those from the West Indies affect weather 
conditions on the entire Atlantic seaboard at 
one and the same time. It is natural to look 
for storms from the former source with 
greater frequency at this season of the year 
than earlier, but just so surely as one of 
them strikes us about mid-September, just 
as certainly will it be tagged an "equinoc- 
tial." The hurricanes from the Gulf, though 
less frequent and with a narrower path, 
serve the same purpose to the superstitious. 
It is usually safe to assume that somewhere, 
some time within a fortnight of mid-Sep- 
tember, there will be a storm, so the 
prophets can be reasonably sure of a realiza- 
tion of their predictions. In the case of a 
drought like the present, however, there is 
a danger that this year even this sort of a 
confirmation will be denied the prognostica- 
tions of the "weather-wise," though the en- 
tire country would be more than willing to 
give them that satisfaction for the sake of 
a soaking rain which would put out the for- 
est fires, fill the springs and restore the 
rivers to their wonted fulness. — Philadelphia 
Public Ledger. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



If the three-masted schooner Future had 
struck anything on her run up the Coast 
from Wilmington, N. C, she would have 
had the tar knocked out of her, for she 
brought into port 800 barrels of it, the first 
shipment of the sticky stuff from North 
Carolina to Boston. 



Word was received at St. John's, N. F., 
recently of the loss of the three-masted 
schooner George Sturges, off the Magdalen 
Islands. The nine men comprising the crew 
were rescued by the Danish steamer Gen- 
eral Consul Pallisen, and were landed at 
Cape Bay on October 4. 



The three-masted schooner Emma F. An- 
gell, Captain G. Tripp, arrived at Boston, 
Mass., recently from Newport News, after 
one of the lengthiest passages in her career. 
She loaded 1300 tons of coal at Newport 
News and left August 28, but was unable 
to leave Hampton Roads on account of the 
heavy gales. 



The turbine steamer Camden, which has 
been running on the International division 
i to St. John via Eastport and Portland dur- 
ing the summer months, has made her last 
trip in that service, and the Calvin Austin, 
which has been taking care of the direct 
service, sailed from Boston recently via the 
Maine ports. 



Among the recent charters closed at Bos- 
ton are those of the Boston schooner J. C. 
Strawbridge, from Apalachicola to Boston, 
with dry cypress lumber, at $6.50 per thou- 
sand feet, with an option of receiving $6 for 
delivery at New York, and the five-masted 
schooner Fannie Palmer, of the Palmer Meet, 
from Philadelphia to Boston with coal, at 
the rate of 50 cents per ton freight money. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



One l>i<; factory linn in Brisbane, 
Australia, is said to be pulling the 
wins in the selection of the employ- 
er^ representative "ii the V\ 

rd of the particular industry to 
which the firm belongs. 

The president of the Broken Hill 
(Australia) Master Bakers' Ass 
tion proposes to establish schools of 
bakery in the various States, presuma- 
bly to have an unlimited supply of 
bakers to draw from when strike time 
falls due. 

In Melbourne, Australia, recently 
the following notice was put on the 
gates of a factory by the proprietors: 
"Boys wanted. Girls wanted. No 
men wanted." Following this comes 
the thought: "What shall we do with 
our fathers?" 

The changes in hours of British 
r taking effect in August, affected 
4,404 workpeople, of whom 2,500 had 
their aggregate working hours in- 
creased by 12,501 per week, and 1,904 
bad reductions amounting to 4,717 
hours per week. 

Returns received from certain se- 
lected British ports show that during 
August 42,126 seamen, of whom 3,798 
I or 9.0 per cent ) were foreigners, were 
shipped on foreign-going vessels. As 
compared with August, 1907, there was 
a decrease of 3,365. 

The Saddlers' Union, of Perth, 
West Australia, after an abortive con- 
ference with the employers, have cited 
Ml linns to the Arbitration Court, ask- 
ing for an award of 48 hours per week 
work, with a minimum wage of £3, 
except for certified incompetents. 

The Hotel and Restaurant Wait- 
resses' Union was successfully estab 
lished at Brisbane, Australia, recently. 
Labor members Bowman, M'Lachlan, 
and -May, with Mr. W. P. Colborne 
and Mrs. J. Huxham, were present, 
and delivered encouraging addresses. 

The West Australian Parliamentary 
reporters, on strike for better accom- 
modation in Parliament House, have 
received messages of sympathy and 
support from the New South Wales 
Institute of Journalists, the staff of 
the Adelaide Advertiser, and other 
Australian journalists. 

The unemployed at Christchurch, 
New Zealand, are organizing, and be- 
ginning with a procession which will 
go round the shops of the city asking 
for food for their wives and families. 
It is stated that the unemployed are 
dependent on donations of money and 
food for rent and sustenance. 

More than 400 cotton mills in Lan- 
cashire arc idle as a result of a dis- 
pute over wages between operatives 
and employers. This means that 40,- 
000,000 spindles are wholly or partial- 
ly stopped and that 140,000 operatives 
are without work and losing over 
some $700,000 in wages a week. 
The unemployed of Liver; 

. on September 10, organized a 
procession and marched to the City 
Hall. Two deputations were re- 
ceived by the Lord Mayor. They 
Showed that 10,000 of the laborers of 
Liverpool were out of work and 
quested relief. 

The total number of case- of poi 
ing reported to the British Home Of- 
fice during August was 61, consisting 
of 58 cases of lead poisoning, - 
mercurial poisoning, and 1 of phos- 
phorous poisoning. In addition to 
the above, Z?> cases of lead poisoning 
(5 of which were fatal) were reported 
•luring August among house-painters 
and plumbers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing- Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

W'e make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LI PPM AN 


BROS. 


532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernest 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Union Goods for Union 


Men 



CJBfTBUSrrjf 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




San Pedro Letter List. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



him. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

lL£WSDEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. M UN SON 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



When making purchases from our ad- 
vertisers, always mention the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Terkel Olsen, a native of Treungen, 
Norway, aged 56, is inquired for by 
his brother. Address Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Halvor Eugen Krogstad, a native 
Christiania, Norway, is inquired for 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, No. 1568, 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is in- 
quired for by his parents. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Bourgevis is inquired for by 
Ed. M. Bourgevis, who has news 
which will require his atention. Ad- 
dress, 3104 West 99th street, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Port- 
land, Or. 

Nils Nilson, a native of Stavanger, 
Norway, last heard of at Buffalo, N. 
Y., four years ago, is inquired for 
by his parents. Address, Nils Nilson, 
Nedre Bloosenborg, No. 9, Stavan- 
ger, Norway. 

Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native 
of Kalmar, Sweden, born September 
15, 1881, supposed to be sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by 
his sisters and parents. Address, 
Klaes Swensson, Sodra Langgatan 
No. 26, Kalmar, Sweden. 

The following seamen, members of 
the crew of the schooner Minnie E. 
Caine, at the time of her wreck in 
1902, are requested to report to the 
Secretary of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific: Wm. McLaugnnn, Julius 
Franz, K. Grunert, J. Koglund, W. 
Wickstrom, C. Christensen. 



lonsen, Ole M. Johnson, G. W. 
Agostino, Failetti -1899 

Althouse, Gustaf Jurgensen. II. 
Andersen. Emll ECaradza, Gus. 

rsen, Fred. J. Kelsen, Carls 
Andersen, Tom -538 Kesse, Teodor. 
Anderson, Chas. Kirst, Hans 

Anderson, Edwart Klaesson, Kar 
Anderson, Axel P. package. 
Anderson, Oscar Klausen, Karl 
Anderson, J. Klein, J. -378 

Andersson, Anders Kristensen, W. 

1 [. Kulil, Herman 

Arnesen, Karl A. Laine, A. 
Axulsson, C. B. Lane, Casper 

Backus, C. I.ange, Frlderik 

Bade, Alexander Larsen, Magie 
Bally, Joe sen, F. -1113 

rill, J. F. Larsen, C. L. -1302 

Barrach, Herman Lewis, T. M. 
Bauchwitz, Fritz Lieberman, -1157 

r, Gosta Liebermann, George 

Behrens, G. -1157 

Benrsln, J. LlndaU, George 

Benard, Sandallo Lindgren, A.-S70 
Berggren, John Lindholm, A. 

Bergh, Borge Lin man, A. W. 

sen, Ole Logothetis, Pana- 

Bernhardren, C. 
Hitter, Herman Lonnecke, Auk 

m Luman, Alku 

Bolander. J. E. Lund, W. -1341 

s E. Lundstedt, Ch. 
Brose, R. Maack, Hans 

Brown, Joe Madeon, James 

Brusbard, Ewalt Maki, Ivar 

Bush, P. Manley, Charlie 

Cappello, H. Martin, John B. 

Carutza, ConstantinMattson, H. J. 

A. McFarland, Dugald 

Carlson, August McKenzie, James 

on, August Mikkelson, C. 

Celley, Edward Murray, Joseph 

Christensen, Christ Nestor, W. C. 
Christensen, W. 1179Nlelsen, M. P. 
Chrstensen, J. -1164Nielsen, W. -1000 
Christensen, Harry Nielsen, Gustave 
Christensen, Gus, Nilsson, Johan 

-1054 Nilsen. H. 

Christiansen, -901 Nilsen, Carl P. -14:i 
l. ay, Louis Nilson, U. -877 
fun, -1156 Nlsson, Louis 

nen, W. Nodeland, George E. 

Ehnke, \Y. Nordblom, Ben 

ESkeland. Sigurd Nordin, M. 
Engebretsen, Mar-Norkamp, Richard 

kus Norman, L. 

Eriekson, August Olsen, C. 

.571 Olsen. W. -753 

Ericksson, C. E. Orten, Sigurd 

Bskbom, Arvid Ostlin, Frank 

l-'alk P. J. Pagel, Erwin 

Pettis, P. L. Pautanido, S., rg. let 

Fjeldstad, John Petersen, W. -1JM 

Ki viand, C. J. Peterson, Nicolous 

Geisler, Hans Pettersen. Alfred 

is, C. rg. let.Rau, R. K. 
Grantley, W. G. Reek, John 

(Package) Robeson, Michael 

Grevelt, Joe Robinson, Alen 

Custafson, A. K. -600Robsham, Jens W. 
Guthree, Raymond. Rodrlquez, Manuel 
Hammond, J. A. Rosan, Os 

Hansberg, J. B. Sardis, Vassilas 

Hansen. Alfred -1732 Savonius, B. 
Hansen. Haakon Scaraboslo, Mario 

Hansen, I.aurits A.Sehlosher, Ludwlg 
Hanson, Frank Schwartz, F. -• 

Hanson. Jacob Sebeline, C. 

Haydn, A. E. Selin, Gustav F. 

nan, John N. Sillin, George • 

Hickman, Fred Skand, C. Johansen 

Hilke, Carl Smith. J. S. 

Holmen, George Sorin, Kristlan 
Holmgren, Joel Steen, Ftnil 

Ingbretsen, -868 Steen, I. -1999 

Ipsen, Edward S. Steen. Ed 
Jacobson, John -1341Svedstrup, E. 
Jamtesen. J. Svensson. Nikolans 

Janson, Chas Swanson, G. 

Janson, F. -1911 Sylvian, Le Bloa 
Jensen, R. -1754 Thompson. Fred. 
Jensen] J. H. -1311 Thoren. Gust 
Johannsen, Chris- Tuominen, Alfred 

tian Uggla, Alfred 

Johansen, C., -1593 Ulke, E. 
johansen, Hans Wanlstedt, Rafael 

Johansson, Johan 880Wiekstrand. J. 
John, Robert Wiksten, Arvid 

Johndahl, Harry Wills. George 
Johnson, A. -1451 Woker, H. 
Jonasson, C. A. Young, Charles 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Simpson, better known as 
Jack Simpson, age 32, who has sailed 
out of New York on the Portland 
Line, is inquired for by his relatives, 
Mr. J. Childs, 208 McDotigall street, 
Riooklyn, N. Y., or communicate with 
the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's 
Union, 15 Union street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The steamer Brunswick, with Charles Ellefsen 
as master, was enrolled at the San Francisco Cus- 
tom-house on October 3. 

E. S. Piggott was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on October 2 as master of 
the steamer St. Helena, vice F. J. Murphy. 

The steam-schooner Mandon went ashore on 
the mud flats in Tillamook Bay, Or., on October 
2, while leaving that harbor with a load of lumber. 
Five vessels flying the German flag are now 
in the Columbia River, Or., the largest number of 
that nationality to be there at the same time for 
several years. 

The schooner John A. Campbell, lying at 
Antioch, Cal., took fire on October 8, and before 
the blaze was extinguished the vessel had been 
damaged to the extent of $2000. 

The steamer Asuncion collided with the steam- 
schooner Norwood, off Point Gorda, Cal., during 
a heavy fog on October 8. The Norwood was 
towed into San Francisco in a waterlogged con- 
dition. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 5: Sloop 
Red Rock, A. Nelson master; steamer Reform, E. 
H. Nielsen master; steamer Shoshone, Edward 
Johnsen master. 

The new Canadian Pacific Railway flyer, Prin- 
cess Charlotte, for the Victoria-Seattle route, will 
leave the Clyde on November 1 for Victoria, ac- 
cording to advices received from Glasgow, Scot- 
land, on October 8. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 9: Steamer Leader, Donald Kennedy, 
vice Martin Hornburg; steamer Roma, Richard 
Dick, vice J. M. Lane. 

Changes arc being made in the pilotage fees 
at Victoria, B. C., whereby rates will be collected 
on a tonnage and draught basis instead of on 
draught alone, as heretofore. Little change is 
made in the amount charged. 

The American ship Reuce, which put into Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., on May 25, leaking and with her 
pumps out of order, started again on her voyage 
for San Francisco on October 9. She has a cargo 
of coal from Newcastle. 

A marvelous mirage was witnescd at Honolulu, 
T. H., on October 7, an exact reproduction of the 
Pacific fleet appearing in the southern sky. The 
fleet was then approaching that port from Samoa, 
but the distance from Honolulu was not known. 
The four-masted British ship Simla will lie a 
total loss at Acapulco, as a result of a fire in her 
coal cargo, according to advices brought by the 
Pacific Mail steamer Newport, which arrived at 
San Francisco on October 3. 

Fred Larson, assistant keeper of the Scotch 
Cap Lighthouse at Unalaska, shot himself through 
the breast on October 3 and inflicted injuries 
which are expected to result fatally. The cause 
of the act is unknown. 

The wireless station at Honolulu, T. H., on 
October 7 overheard a message sent by the sta- 
tion at Tatoosh, located at the mouth of Puget 
Sound, to the Army transport Thomas, which 
sailed from San Francisco on October 5 bound 
for Manila. 

Captain H. C. Nelson of the steamer Nann 
Smith reports to the Branch Hydrographic of- 
fice at San Francisco that the bar at the entrance 
to Coos Bay, Oregon, is shoaling. Captain Nel- 
son found but nineteen feet at high water when 
crossing the bar at 9 a. m. on October 5. 

The French bark Alice Marie, while on her 
way from Birkenhead for Antwerp, was wrecked 
in the English Channel, according to advices re- 
ceived at San Francisco on October 7. The Alice 
Marie was under charter to A. Carpenter and 
loaded cargo at Antwerp for San Francisco. 

Federal investigation into the loss of the bark 
Star of Bengal, with 111 lives, on Coronation 
Island, September 20, has resulted in filing of 
direct charges of responsibility against Captain 
Patrick Hamilton, of the tug Kayak, and Captain 
F. Farrar, of the tug Tint tie Gage, for the tragedy. 
The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 3: Steamer Christopher Columbus, 
Thomas G. Low, vice Virginia Falcon; steamer 
Defiance, John G. Trapp, vice John Olssen; 
steamer R. D. Tnman, C. J. Lancaster, vice E. N. 
1 [ardwick 

The schooner Seven Sisters, bound for Nome, 
Alaska, from the coal fields on Corwin Bluffs, 
lies a complete wreck on the beach near Shisma- 
roff Inlet. The vessel struck during the recent 
storms and soon went to pieces. No lives were 
hwt. The crew escaped by walking overland 
after the vessel beached. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 5: Steamer Gold, B. J. Benson, vice 
Donald Kennedy; steamer Sunlight, W. H. Walk- 
er, vice 11. E Short/-; schooner Emily Lundt, 
Frank Christensen, vice Andrew Torgersen; 
steamer Korea, S. Sandberg. vice A. Dixon. 

Completing what is said to be the record pass- 



age between the Antipodes and Puget Sound, the 
French bark Amiral Cecile arrived at Port Town- 
send, Wash., on October 3, forty-seven days out 
from Hobart, Tasmania. The vessel experienced 
favorable weather throughout the journey and is 
now awaiting orders. 

Salvage on the British steamer Aeon of the 
Australian Mail line, which is a wreck on Christ- 
mas Island, in the South Seas, is said to be un- 
satisfactory. The recommendation will probably 
be made that the Aeon be sold. Since the Aeon 
went ashore on the coral reefs of the deserted 
island several months ago, the elements have 
treated her badly, and the vessel is a total wreck. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 6: Steamer Juliette, J. F. Chlemens, vice 
Peter Hansen; steamer Guide, Charles A. Ander- 
son, vice Thomas Andusay; steamer Picket, Dan- 
iel Fitzgerald, vice Daniel G. Webster; steamer 
Sentinel, George G. De Coursey, vice Charles An- 
dersen; schooner Ethel Zane, Oscar Oberg, vice 
A. Pedersen. 

A bottle was washed ashore at Kapaa, on the 
northeast coast of the Island of Kaui, T. H., and 
picked up on September 18 by C. B. Gray, con- 
taining the following message: "From George 
Ponsonby, chief steward of the American ship 
Kenilworth, from Newport for San Francisco, 
ninety-nine days out, March 10, 1908." Neither 
the latitude nor longitude of the ship was given 
in the message. 

A libel was filed in the United States District 
Count at San Francisco on October 3 by Attor- 
ney S. C. Wright to obtain $46.95 for his clients, 
Emil Munder, Hugo Miller and Henrietta Mun- 
der, doing business as William Munder Sons. It 
is alleged that the libellants made repairs on the 
schooner Sophie E. amounting to the amount 
sued for, and, not having been paid, the libel has 
been filed against the craft and her tackle. 

Meyer Bloom, owner of the scow-schooner 
Josie, filed a libel yesterday in the United States 
District Court at San Francisco on October 3, to 
recover $1710 from the tug Ana Warren, as a 
result of a collision between the two vessels on 
June 19. The Josie had on a cargo of dynamite, 
which she had been engaged to transport from 
Point Pinole to San Francisco, at the time of the 
collision, and it was a marvel that the two ves- 
sels were not blown to atoms. 

The work of raising the steamer Pomona from 
the reef she has rested on since last March off 
Fort Ross has been hampered by the lack of 
sufficient apparatus. The Pomona has been 
raised two feet, but still remains in the same 
position. It was found that more tubing and 
another compressed-air pump would be required 
to facilitate the work. These will be taken to the 
scene of the wreck, and, if everything goes well, 
the wrecking company is confident that the Po- 
mona will be floated and towed to San Francisco. 

The following changes of masters were re- 
corded at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
September 30: Steamer Mariner, Joseph Santos, 
vice S. N. Leffingwell; schooner Alert, Robert 
Krebs, vice J. M. Perry; steamer Sea Witch, 
Richard W. J. R. Dabel, vice Otto W. Olson; 
steamer Crowley No. 2, John P. Lattimore, vice 
George B. Johnson; steamer Crowley No. 5, Hu- 
bert Jennings, vice John P. Lattimore; steamer 
Crowley No. 8, Randolph Merriweather, vice El- 
mer Wagner; schooner Santiago, James McAvoy, 
vice H. Engells. 

Bids were opened at Astoria, Or., on October 
1 by G. W. Roberts, general agent of the Oregon 
Railroad and Navigation Company, for the pur- 
chase of the derelict steam-schooner Minnie E. 
Kelton and her cargo of lumber, the schooner be- 
ing tied up at the wharf of the company in that 
city. A number of bids were received, but tin- 
amounts of each were not made public. It was 
announced, however, that Henry Hewitt, a Port- 
land marine insurance agent, was the highest 
bidder and that the vessel had been sold to him 
at a figure satisfactory to the company and the 
underwriters. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on October 9: Ship Toxteth, 221 
days from Port Talbot, 90 per cent; bark Cric- 
cieth Castle, 136 days from Barry for Mejillones, 
20 per cent; ship Leicester Castle, 150 days from 
Cardiff for Pisagua, 15 per cent; bark Waterloo, 
162 days from Shields for Callao, 10 per cent; 
ship Jupiter, 176 days from Liverpool for Puget 
Sound, 10 per cent; ship Acamas, 168 days from 
Rotterdam for San Francisco, 10 per cent; bark 
Grande Duchesse Olga, 101 days from Newcastle. 
New South Wales, for San Francisco, 15 per 
cent. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 

For good beds and clean rooms, go to "THE 
HARRISON," 456 Harrison street, corner of 
First, San Francisco. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. t 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 125 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: . 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 143 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 222 State St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
J O U R N Al_— — 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTIIUR Editor 

PAUL S( 'I I A RRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN AH VANCE. 

One year, i>y mall - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 

Advertising- Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
14-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
pressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript, 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1908. 



CALIFORNIA LABOR SPEAKS. 



California State Federation of Labor in 
Ninth Annual * Convention assembled, unequivo 
tally indorses the political policy of its parent 
body, the American Federation of Labor. 

The California State Federation of Labor de- 
sires to particularly direct the attention of the 
working men and women of this State to the 
following facts: 

1. That by a recent decision of the United 
States Supreme Court, the Sherman Aati-Trust 
law has been made to apply to Trade and Labor 
Unions; that the Sherman Anti-Trust law so in- 
terpreted makes it possible for an employer who 
claims to be financially injured as a result of a 
controversy with a trade-union, to bring suit 
against said union and recover treble the damages 
he may allege to have suffered. If the treasury 
of the union is not sufficient to pay the award, suit 
may be brought against each and every individual 
member. 

2. That laboring people are now, and have 
been for several years, denied the right of trial 
by jury by the action of Federal judges in issuing 
injunctions in labor disputes. At the present time 
the honored President of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, Samuel Gompers, the Secretary, 
Frank Morrison, and Vice-President John 
Mitchell are in danger of being imprisoned 
as a result of an alleged violation of a mandate 
issued by a Federal judge. 

3. That the present Congress has not only- 
refused to adopt legislation remedying these in- 
justices to the working people, but has openly 
insulted the duly accredited representatives of 
labor. 

4. That the National convention of the Repub- 
lican party refused to insert a plank in its plat 
form promising labor relief from the injunction 
abuses and the provisions of the Sherman Anti- 
Trust law. 

5. That the National convention of the Demo- 
cratic party did insert the planks requested by 
the American Federation of Labor. 

6. That either one or the other of the above- 
named parties will elect the next President and 
have a working majority in Congo :ss. 

In view of these facts, the California State 
Federation of Labor earnestly requests the work- 
ing people of this State to use every honorable 
means to defeat their enemies and elect their 
friends. 

The foregoing statement was adopted by 
the California State Federation of Labor in 
convention at San Jose last week. With the 
exception of a few delegates ("less than half 
a dozen in all), the vote of the convention 
was unanimous. This action on the part 
of the representative body of organized labor 
in California may be taken as a reliable in- 
dication of the sentiment prevailing among 
the organized workers throughout the State. 
In a word, the "labor vote" of California 
will be "delivered," not by Samuel Gompers, 
but by the labor voters themselves, to that 



party which offers the only prospect of re- 
lief from the dangerous and oppressive con- 
ditions now confronting the labor move- 
ment. 

The action of the State Federation of 
Labor is more significant than appears on 
the face of it. Two propositions dealing 
with the political situation were submitted 
for consideration by the convention. One 
of these was drafted in language designed to 
avoid the slightest possible ground of op- 
position on the part of any delegate who 
might feel it incumbent upon him to resent 
anything that looked like taking a slap at 
his own particular political faith. The other 
and more outspoken proposition was that 
adopted by the convention. Upon consid- 
eration of the two propositions by the com- 
mittee to which they were referred it was 
decided to report the latter as being at once 
the most emphatic and most in keeping with 
the views of the convention. The practi- 
cally unanimous action of the convention 
manifests a depth of conviction on the part 
of the delegates that carries them beyond 
all question of personal preference in 
pi ilitical affairs. 

The labor movement of California has 
ever loyally upheld the principles and pol- 
icies of the American Federation of Labor, 
to which fact it owes much of its success. 
The action of the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor in indorsing the policy of the 
parent body in the present political cam- 
paign proves that the State labor movement 
remains true to its traditions and may be 
depended upon to do its full duty in de- 
fending the rights of the labor movement 
throughout the country. 



MAGUIRE CLUB FORMED. 



Notice has already been given in these 
columns of the action of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific in indorsing the candidacy of 
James C. Maguire for Congress from the 
Fourth district of California. In pursuance 
of this action a number of members of the 
Union met in the Sailors' Union Hall, San 
Francisco, last .Monday night ami organized 
a club for the purpose of furthering the in- 
terests of Judge Maguire. Temporary or- 
ganization was completed under the name 
of the Water Front Maguire Club, and the 
following temporary officers were elected: 
Chairman. Walter Macarthur; Secretary- 
Treasurer, Paul Scharrenberg ; Committee on 
Organization, E. Ellison, E. A. Erickson, 
II. F. Durholt, Charles Taucer and N. Jor- 
tall. The Committee on Organization will 
enlist the aid of all voters on the water 
front, particularly among the members of 
the maritime unions. Arrangements are be- 
ing made for a general meeting to-morrow 
(Thursday) evening at Sailors' Union Hall, 
at which permanent organization will be 
formed. Judge Maguire and others will 
speak on that occasion. Secretary-Treasurer 
Scharrenberg has been authorized to receive 
contributions for carrying on the work of 
the Club. All seamen and their friends on 
the waterfront are urgently invited to enroll 
themselves and lend their active support in 
the campaign for the return to Congress of 
the "American Plimsoll." 



One of the best, if not the very best, forms 
of union label propaganda is a union label ad 
in a union label paper. 



TO REPEAL SLAVE LAW. 



The recent convention of the California 
Slate Federation of Labor reaffirmed the 
declaration of that body in support of the 
Seamen's bill for the repeal of Section '.-If 
of the Criminal Code, which makes it a mis- 
demeanor to "entice a seaman to desert." 
The convention adopted the following reso- 
lution : 

Whereas, At the instance of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, bills were introduced in the last 
regular session of the State Legislature, pro 
viding for the repeal of Sections 644 and 645 of 
tin Penal Code of the State of California, which 
statutes respectively make it a n . ir to 

assist a seaman to "desert," i. e., leave his emploj 
ment, and to "harbor a deserting seaman," i. c., 
assist him m securing other employment; said 
bills being passed by both Houses of the I 
lature, the latter bill becoming law, while the 
former failed to receive the approval of the Gov- 
ern. >r; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation 
of Labor, in convention assembled, that we in- 
dorse, commend and pledge our support to the 
efforts of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific to have 
removed from the statute books of this State the 
last remnant of vested right or ownership in the 
labor of the seamen; to make the laws of this 
State conform to the Navigation laws of the 
United States, instead of acting as an obstacle 
and a hindrance to the exercise of the rights 
guaranteed to the seamen by the latter; and to 
have extended to the seamen the benefits of the 
Personal Relations law now- enjoyed by all the 
other workers of this State. 

Translated into ordinary language, Sec- 
tion o44 of the State law makes it a misde- 
meanor for a seaman to leave his vessel or 
for anyone to assist him in doing so. \ s the 
resolution of the State Federation of Labor 
points out, the State law is thus a relic of 
the ancient system of treating the seaman 
as the property of the ship or shipowner, 
a system that has been abolished by the 
repeal of a similar statute in the United 
States Navigation laws. The State Federa- 
tion of Labor will co-operate with the or- 
ganized seamen in a renewed attempt to 
bring the State law into conformity with 
National law on this important subject. 



The holding of the American Federation of 
Labor convention in Denver. Col., affords a 
good opportunity to central bodies and local 
trade and federal labor unions to secure repre- 
sentation at a comparatively small cost. All 
such bodies should avail themselves of this 
geographical advantage to take full part in 
what is likely to prove the most important 
convention in the history of the Federation. 



Seamen and other readers of the Journal, 
when purchasing cigars or tobacco, should 
demand the union label of the Cigarmakers 
or Tobacco Workers, as the case may be. The 
labels of these crafts are the only guarantee 
that the products in question arc not made In- 
Chinese, tenement-house or child labor. 



Labor's Watchword: We will -(and faith- 
fully by our friends and elect them; oppose 
our enemies and defeat them, whether they be 
candidates for President, Congress, or other 
offices, Executive, Legislative, or Judicial 
— American Federation of Labor. 



Mi n of Labor] Stand by your unions. Be 

steadfast ami true to yourselves and Labor's 
great cause, and a TRIUMPH FOR JUSTICE, 
RIGHT, AM) HU.MAX FREEDOM IS VOURS. — 

American Federation of Labor. 



Rally to the meeting of the Water Front 
Maguire Club at Sailors' Union Hall to- 
morrow (Thursday i night! Judge Maguire 
and others will speak. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 



The following tables give the list of deaths of 
members of the Alaska Fishermen's Union during 
the season of 1908, and the list of contributions 
made by members to the widow of August H. 
Sundberg: 



si . . . i%i 



■^ 5 a c ~ 



B £> to a h (- 






rtoo.ssooa/O.s.so 



3 £ 



• -r io co iq m t— 'j? irt o c- - 

ift ?1 ? I SO -V i-i I ft - 



:5* 



_C In",!! c 



So - <i> *r, 

« eS n! a) G 3 o 



TO - '" 



o] m — - 



c" e 

<» o 

t f 

» a 



3 a 



a* 



' 'C ""O 'O r ^> r & r & 'O 'O ' 

cccccccc 

In Ifi Vk l/i *Vi~vi*w'm 

X 

CCCCCCCCd 

,oooooo_ooto 

KWcScSrtrtcScS — 

ceaeaeea2 
oooooooo/; 

oooooooo" 
QOOOUOOU 



££££££££ 






{£ is « is p: ■a & -o £ 

OOkOOfeOfeO 



tc s i p i — , -r ^d oo 01 c - 

COC-lrJ-COlQ "*C-«3 



^ : :k s : *- ^ 



_ 5 cScs : 

cJcfsO 
a .rt^So^o 

tS^ 0) O; ^ d; ^ !?m 



San Francisco, Cal., October 9, 1908. 
Total subscriptions by the members of the 
Alaska Fishermen's Union to the widow of Au- 
gust H. Sundberg, who was drowned from the 
ship St. Paul on April 16, 1908, while on the 
passage from Seattle to the Northwestern Fisher- 
ies Company's Cannery, Chignik, Alaska: 

Alaska Packers' Association. 

Fort Wrangle Cannery $ 50.00 

Loring Cannery 45.50 

Chignik Cannery 121.50 

Scandinavian Cannery, Nushagak 53.50 
Clark's Cannery, Nushagak.... 87.00 
Bradford's Cannery, Nushagak.. 72.00 
Koggiung Cannery, Kwichak.... 309.50 

Crew of ship Manga Rcva 53.00 

Crew of ship Tacoma 83.50 

Crew of ship L. J. Morse 18.00 $ 893.50 

Northwestern Fisheries Co., Seattle. 

Orca Cannery $105.50 

Nushagak Cannery 55.50 

Chignik Cannery 305.50 

Uyak Bay Cannery 179.00 

Captain Jarvis, manager of the 

N. W. F. Company 200.00 $845.50 

North Alaska Salmon Company. 

Lockonock Cannery 35.50 

Egagak Cannery 24.00 

Nushagak Cannery 117.50 

Crew of ship Standard o4.00 $231.00 

Astoria Companies in Alaska. 

Alaska Fishermen's Cannery, 

Nushagak $ 47.00 

Columbia River Packers' Ass'n.. 46.50 $ 93.50 

F. B. Peterson's Cannery, Nak- 

nek River 49.50 

Nelson Lagoon Fishermen 48.00 

An unknown friend, per .Andrew 

Brandt 1.00 

William Pitrow 1.50 

C. Peterson 1.00 $101.00 

Grand total received by Mrs. 
August H. Sundberg to date. $2164.50 $2164.50 

Subscriptions were also taken up at the A. P. 
A. Cannery, Naknek, -and at the N. A. S. Co. Can- 
nery, Hallerville, but as same bad not been de- 
ducted from the fishermen's pay, we therefore 
collected from these men as they were paid off, 
Hence you will note collections from crews of 
these vessels. 

At the following canneries no subscriptions 
were taken up: 

A. P. A. Cannery, Pyramid Harbor, and A. 
P. A. Cannery at Alitak; Nelson and Olson's 
Salting Station, Kwichak River, Peter M. Nel- 
son's Salting Station, Egushik River, L. A. Pcdcr- 
sen's Cannery, Koggiung, F. B. Peterson's Can- 
nery, Ugashik River. Portland Parkers' Associa- 
tion's Cannery at Nushagak, and the A. P. A. 



Salting Station at Ugashik River. Cook's Inlet 
and Karluk are yet to be heard from. 
Respectfully submitted. 

Mark Elynn, No. 132; Axel Anderson, No. 252; 
Steve Bloomfield, No. 227, Committee. 

I. N. HYLEN, 
Secretary Alaska Fishermen's Union. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 



San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 9, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting of the Alaska Fisher- 
men's Union was called to order by the secre- 
tary at 8 p. m. Fred Swanson was elected chair- 
man. Secretary reported having turned in to 
Mrs. Aug. 11. Sundberg $2164.50, the total amount 
subscribed for her benefit to date by the Alaska 
fishermen. Karluk and Cooks Inlet are still to 
be heard from. Shipwreck Benefit was ordered 
paid in full to Alf. Olson, Andrew Olson, Harry 
A. Lewald, George Johnson and Olof Hansen. 
The Second Quarterly Finance Committee re- 
ported having found the accounts of the union 
correct. Report was adopted as read. 

A vote of thanks was given to the Alaska 
Packers' Association for the kind treatment shown 
to the survivors of the wrecked Star of Bengal. 

Delegates to the conference of the United Fish 
ermen of the Pacific, to be held in Seattle Nov- 
ember 10, will be balloted for at next Friday's 
meeting, and all members in port are requested 
to attend. 

I. N. HYLEN, Secretary. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters, Chicago, Oct. 5, 1908. 
Situation quiet. 

WM. PENJE, Secretary. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1908. 
Condition unchanged; shipping very dull. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 
55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 6, 1908. 
General situation unchanged. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
V/ 2 h Lewis St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Oct. 6, 1908. 
Situation improving. 

H. P. GRIFFIN, Secretary. 
42 South St. 



Captain Jakobsen of the schooner Metha Nel- 
son, which arrived at San Francisco on October 
8, fifty-six days from the Friendly Islands in the 
South Pacific, charges that his first-mate, 
Charles Osborne, endeavored to incite a mutiny 
among the crew on the passage. On September 
11, Captain Jakobsen says he released Mate Os- 
borne from duty because he refused to obey or- 
ders, and was working the crew into a mutinous 
state. 



Five new lights at Willapa Bay and one at 
Grays Harbor, Wash., are being established and 
will be in commission by November 1. With 
these additional aids to navigation it is held that 
the danger to shipping at those points will be 
greatly lessened. In fact, Captain Pond, light- 
house inspector of the district, says the danger 
heretofore dreaded by mariners going there will 
be entirely eliminated. 



The crew of the Chilean bark Eaton Hall, 
which was reported dismasted at Papeete several 
weeks ago, are stranded on the island in the South 
Seas. The Chilean vessel, after her ill-fated voy- 
age, is for sale in the harbor of Papeete. Rather 
than go to the expense of rerigging the bark-, her 
owners have decided to dispose of her and her 
cargo of coal, which she was carrying from New- 
castle to Valparaiso. 



The officers on the Mare Island (Cal.) Navy 
Yard have been notified that a new Hag has been 
adopted for the Navy by the Department at 
Washington. The new emblem is for the use of 
submarine parent ships to warn other craft that 
there arc submarines about and that they must 
navigate with care lest they collide with one of 
the submarine vessels. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 12, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., M. Hunter presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping quiet. The delegates to the re 
cent convention of the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor submitted their report. 

NOTICE: Nominees for delegates to the New 
Orleans convention of the International Seamen's 
Union of America who desire to have their names 
placed upon the ballot must notify the Secretary 
or the Committee on Ballot on or before Satur- 
day, October 17. The Shipwreck Benefit was 
ordered paid to live members wrecked in the 
Star of Bengal. 

E. ELLISON, Secretary pro tern. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, 1!. C, Agency, Oct. S, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

A. E. SIMMONDS, Agent. 
Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 5, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros 
pects a little better. 

II. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 5, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 5, 19(18. 
Situatii m unchanged. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
229>4 Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 5, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Oct. 5, 1908. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 4, 1908. 
No meeting: no quorum; shipping medium. 

ERNEST HORLIN, Agent pro tern. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 5, 1908. 
Shipping dull. 

II. OTILSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 28, 1908. 
Shipping slack. 

JOSEPH T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 8, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping quiet. The report of the Quar- 
terly Finance Committee, finding stubs, books, 
money in banks and cash on hand correct, was 
read and adopted. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency. Oct, 1. 1908. 
Shipping medium. Nominated officers for the 
ensuing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 1, 1908. 
Shipping fair. Nominated officers for the en 
suing term. 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2155. 



DIED. 

Martin Gundersen, No. 697, a native of Norway, 
aged 32, died at Nushagak, Alaska, on June 15, 
1908. 

\mlers Johansson. No. 1640, a native of Sweden, 

aged 11. drowned in the wreck oi the Bchooner 

John F. .Miller, at Unimak Maud, Jan. 9, 1908. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



OIN THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*&£* 



LAKE CARRIERS NOT REASONABLE. 



Any charge that the seamen's unions on 
the Great Lakes have been in the slightest 
degree unfair or unreasonable in their de- 
mands upon the vesselovvners is easily 
proven untrue. The unions are on record 
as being conservative and just in their deal- 
ings with all whom they have come in con- 
tact with, and they are showing no disposition 
to alter their methods. How different the posi- 
tion now being taken by the Lake Carriers' 
Association! Its unwarranted attack upon 
the seamen and their rights can not be jus- 
tified by any reasonable argument. 

During the five years previous to 1908 
annual agreements were signed between the 
Lake Carriers' Association and the unions 
affiliated with the International Seamen's 
Union of America. All differences were 
settled in the spring of each year by the 
simple process of vesselowners and sea- 
men meeting together in conference and 
discussing their difficulties. Seamen and 
vesselowners alike seemed amenable to 
reason. While neither side got everything 
it claimed, the conferences always resulted 
in an agreement between both parties. Not 
once during these years did any part of the 
International Seamen's Union of America 
on the Lakes resort to a strike to enforce a 
claim; neither were any threats of a strike 
made. In the face of such a record how 
can the organized seamen be truthfully ac- 
cused of having been at all unreasonable? 

The seamen's unions, which now include 
the Lake Seamen's Union, the Marine Fire- 
men, Oilers and Watertenders' Association, 
and the Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union, 
were prepared to proceed along the same 
conservative lines this season. 

The Lake Carriers' Association, however, 
which contains in its membership vessel- 
owners who had gained a reputation for 
fairness in their dealings with labor, sud- 
denly altered its position ; fairness and 
square dealing with labor were thrown 
overboard. 

Why this sudden change of front on the 
part of the Lake Carriers' Association? 

It can be explained only upon the assump- 
tion that the vesselowners had never really 
intended to be fair with labor, that they 
have all along simply been waiting for an 
opportunity to attack, and, if possible, des- 
troy the unions. The "square-deal" meth- 
od of dealing with labor evidently did not 
have the approval of the vesselowners at 
any time. Their claim of fairness toward 
organized labor appears to have been only 
a matter of expediency. Under the pres- 
ent circumstances no other explanation is 
possible. 

The unions, on the other hand, have 
proven beyond a doubt that their profes- 
sions of a desire to deal fairly with the em- 
ployers are based upon a real desire to do 
what is right and just at all times, regard- 
less of apparent opportunities to squeeze 
the other fellow. 

The five years of trade agreements on the 
Lakes were all good business years, some 
of them exceptionally good. There were un- 
doubtedly times when the seamen's unions 



by declaring a strike, or perhaps only 
threatening to do so, could have secured 
greater concessions from the vesselowners. 
No such means were resorted to. 

The unions have sincerely stood for 
peaceful settlement of labor difficulties. 
Their position is unchanged. But it takes 
two sides to agree to peace. If the organized 
vesselowners will not agree to amicable re- 
lations between themselves and the or- 
ganized seamen, then there is nothing for 
the seamen's unions to do except to even- 
tually agree to test of strength. Should 
such a course prove necessary there is no 
doubt that the seamen will be able to give 
a good account of themselves. 

Heretofore, since 1903, all differences be- 
tween the Lake Carriers' and the seamen's 
unions have been settled by a fair discus- 
sion and argument of the claims of both 
parties. The organized seamen do nol 
hesitate to say that they are willing to con- 
tinue that method of adjusting their griev- 
ances. 

If the Lake Carriers' Association persists 
in declining to treat with the organized 
seamen, then it may be said that they so re- 
fuse for the reason that the arguments of 
the seamen have been unanswerable, that 
hearing the seamen convinces the listener, 
and that the owners do not propose to take 
any more chances of being convinced that 
further improvements are needed by the 
sailors. 

There is an old saying, "The man con- 
vinced against his will is of the same opinion 
still." The Lake Carriers, it now appears, 
have been "convinced against their will" 
through their meetings with the seamen's 
unions, and they are evidently "of the same 
opinion still" as they were when they 
thought a wage scale of $15 to $30 a month 
was sufficient for seamen. 

The Lake Carriers do not want to he 
reasonable, for, having failed to overcome 
the common sense, logic and fairness of the 
arguments presented by the seamen in the 
past, they have this season resorted to in- 
timidation and coercion to gain their point. 

Well, the organized seamen will continue 
to stick together, to act reasonably and fair 
to all with whom they may have dealings, 
but they certainly will not submit to the 
utterly unreasonable demand that they sur- 
render their unions. 

Joshua Blunt. 



WILL BE DELIVERED THIS YEAR. 



Construction work will be rushed on the 
new White Star line steamer and delivery 
of the hull in Detroit is promised by the 
Toledo Shipbuilding Company by December 
15. The steel will be rushed out of the mills 
at Pittsburg, so that no delay may result at 
that end. The new vessel will have trim 
tanks to add to her other good features. 
She will be thirty-eight feet beam on deck. 
General Manager Parker says he will leave 
the selection of the boat's machinery to the 
men who will sail her, and that the chief 
officers of the boat will themselves install 
the finer fittings. 



TRAFFIC THROUGH ST. MARY'S. 



Traffic through the St. Mary's ship canals 
shows a big falling off this season. The slump 
is due almost entirely to the comparatively 
light shipments of iron ore and grain. It is 
much doubted that the commerce will total 
45,000,000 net tons. This would be approxi- 
mately the same as that of 1905, but a great 
decrease from 1906 to 1907, when the freight 
movement amounted to 51.751,080 and 58,- 
217,214 tons respectively. Compared with 
last season, the traffic through the canal-, in 
net tons, has been as follows : 

1908. 1007. 

April 107,05s 1,078,613 

May 1,561,084 7,844,264 

June 4,334,183 8,865,442 

July 7,088,149 7. 1' '3.236 

August 7,181.430 8,544,833 

Totals 20,271 .004 33,526,388 

Since the opening of the American canal, 
fifty-three years ago, there have been trans- 
ported through the St. Mary's waterways, the 
present season's traffic included, approximate- 
ly 530,000,000 net tons of freight. For each 
decade the total tonnage has been as follow- : 
Year. Net Tons. 

1855-1864 1,203,358 

1865-1874 4,829,247 

1875-1884 14,868,639 

1885-1894 80,3 13,218 

1895-1904 253,002//)/- 

1905 44.270,680 

1906 51.751.080 

1907 5S.217.21 4 

1908 20.271, ( )04 

Total 528,758,037 

( )f the 58,000,000 tons of freight carried 
through the canals last season, 45,000,000 tons 
went east and the balance, largely made of 
coal, was westbound. The value of the total 
freight reached the enormous sum of $560,- 
830,188, of which coal constituted 6 per cent; 
Hour, wheat and other grain, 20 per cent; 
iron ore. 26 per cent: manufactured and pig 
iron, 4 per cent; copper, 5 per cent; lumber, 
3 per cent, and salt, building stone and gen- 
eral merchandise, 27 per cent. There was 
paid for the transportation of the freight a 
total of $38,457,345. 

This year, while the freight traffic shows a 
decided falling off, the passenger business 
-how- a considerable increase. In fact, there 
has never been a season of so nluch travel on 
the Great Lake-. 



Fast time was made in unloading the 
steamer 1'.. 1'. Join- at M. A. llanna & Co.'s 
dock at Ashtabula recently. The big freight- 
er, which had 10.401 tons of ore, reached 
the dock at 12:15 in the morning and she 
was ready to sail at 8:30. The actual work- 
in- time in handling the cargo was seven 
hours. 



( >re receipts at Conneaut for August ex- 
ceeded all previous records for that month 
at that port, although behind the new mark 
of 987,691 tons made in July. The receipts 
in August totaled '^X.TJ.^ tons. A total of 
2,465,706 tons lias been received at Con- 
neaut. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



JOLTS BY JOSHUA. 



Get busy ! 
Talk unionism. 



Organization is necessary to civilization. 



The way to handle "Open Shop" is to 
have an open union. 



The strength of a union depends upon 
the amount of energy and determination 
displayed by its members. Keep hustling 
for the good cause ; that's what wins. 



The wheelsmen and watchmen have im- 
portant work to perform during the next 
few months, they should never neglect an 
opportunity to talk unionism to the non- 
union deckhands, as well as to other sea- 
men. 



For a union man to always act right is 
good, but he should not forget to always 
talk right also. Speech is more frequent 
than action. One may therefore often do 
more harm by talking wrong than by act- 
ing wrong:. 



Why speak of whether organized seamen 
can or can not accomplish the objects for 
which they get together in a union. It is 
not a question of "can" or can not." It's 
simply "will" or "won't." And the organ- 
ized seamen will. Nothing- else to it. 



Don't forget that it is only about nine 
years since the vesselowner thought sixty- 
seven cents to a dollar a day sufficient pay 
for a wheelsman or watchman, and fifty 
cents a day for ordinary-seamen. That was 
when the shipowner on the Lakes was deal- 
ing with the individual seaman, before the 
men were organized. By getting together 
in a union the seamen raised the wages. 

Now the vesselowner wants to ^disrupt 
the unions on the Lakes so that he may 
again deal "to" individuals just what he 
sees fit to give them. No, no, Mr. Vessel- 
owner; we have not forgotten those times 
either. 



When the unions of seamen succeeded in 
securing a raise of wages in the spring of 
1907, the wages of the licensed mates, who 
were unorganized, also increased. The 
mates and pilots should not forget that the 
rule works both ways, and that when the 
wages of the seamen go down, the mates' 
wages will likewise take a tumble. 



When a union succeeds in raising the 
standard of wages and securing better work- 
ing conditions the unorganized workers are 
benefited as well as the actual members 
of the union. The beneficent influence of 
unionism reaches the unorganized as well 
as the organized workers and improves the 
conditions of all. 

The unorganized workers should there- 
fore understand that when employers at- 
tack a labor union the unorganized men will 
suffer if the union men are defeated. Ever)' 
workingman that joins a union lessens the 
probability of defeat. Hence all should 
join. 



soul." But the vesselowners evidently fear 
its effect on their pocketbooks. That's 
what it looks like, at any rate, since they 
abandoned the "free and open discussion" 
method of dealing with labor. The argu- 
ments presented by the seamen at past 
wage conferences must have been so un- 
answerable, so logical, that the vesselowners 
saw they would surely be convinced that 
further improvements were needed in the 
working conditions of the seamen, if they 
continued to lay themselves open to the 
arguments, by permitting a calm discus- 
sion of the matter. So they now want to 
deal with individuals only. It seems that 
the organized seamen have proved "too 
many" for the owners in more senses than 
one. 



During the strike of the ore-dock work- 
ers at Superior, last July, about one hun- 
dred and fifty seamen were discharged from 
Lake Carriers' vessels because they declined 
to leave the ships and go up on the docks 
to "punch" ore. Every one of those seamen 
were under articles for the round trip, yet 
the Lake Carriers' did not hesitate to dis- 
charge them, there being no United States 
court or marshal at Superior. 

Only a year ago these same owners made 
some very vigorous complaints because a 
union seaman occasionally left their ships 
before completing the trip. The vessel- 
owners seem anxious that the seamen should 
be complelled to stay by the ship, but the 
owners do not hesitate to discharge the sea- 
men at any old place for any reason or no 
reason, especially in a port like Superior 
where no United States marshal can be 
reached except by going to Madison, Wis. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



There is a slimy liar, a "union busting" 
cop at Ashtabula. No union men are al- 
lowed to stay in Ashtabula if the plain 
clothes detective knows it. He recently ar- 
rested all the union sailors he could find and 
"his honor" promptly fined them $25 and 
costs, and gave them thirty minutes to leave 
town. The cop advised them to tear up 
their union books as the "damn union" was 
busted. Don't forget him ! 



A force of from 400 to 500 men has been 
busy recently at the yards of the Great 
Lakes Engineering Works at Ecorse, getting 
out material preparatory to laying the hulls 
of vessels No. 56 and No. 57, 450 feet over 
all, supposed to be the two ships to be con- 
structed by the engineering company for 
Boland & Cornelius, of Buffalo, this winter. 
Thus far the work at the yards has been 
confined to the plate and punch sheds. It 
is said that the working force at the yard 
will be gradually increased. 



"Free and open discussion is good for the 



Captain James Reid, who is engaged in 
wrecking the steamer Turret Belle, near St. 
Peter, Prince Edward Island, has moved 
the boat 200 feet and has 100 feet more to 
go before she will be afloat again. He had 
to turn the vessel around before starting her 
for the ocean. He has been somewhat de- 
layed by the weather, having arrived at St. 
Peter about three weeks too late to take ad- 
vantage of favorable conditions. 



E. J. Wheeler is inquired for by his sister, 
Mrs. Lillian Allen, 2619 J street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Comrade Walter Birrell will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Leonard Hull, R. F. D., 
No. 1, Hope, Mich. 

Second-Mate James Tobin, shipkeeper on 
the steamer Selwyn Eddy, at Milwaukee, is 
reported missing. 

Ed. Ratl.enow, No. 5388, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is inquired for by his sister, Mrs. Chris 
Marquist, 429 N. Clark street, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Bonner, No. 7823, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is requested to communicate with his 
sister, who is very ill, at Kingston, Ontario. 

John Livingstone Ritchie, No. 21289, Lake 
Seamen's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. M. A. Ritchie, 283 N. Lisgar street, To- 
ronto, Ont. 

John McCormick, a marine fireman, who 
left the Lakes about a year ago, is inquired 
for by Frank McCormick, 191 Fourth street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. Important news. 

William Nilson, a native of Stavanger, Nor- 
way, last heard from at Buffalo, N. Y., in De- 
cember, 1907, is inquired for by his parents. 
Address, Nils Nilson, Nedre Blassenborg, No. 
9, Stavanger, Norway. 

John Urquhart is wanted by his sister, 
Ethel Urquhart, East Tawas, Mich. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts or last ad- 
dress will please communicate with her or 
W. H. Jenkins, Conneaut, O. 

Herbert Douglas, Lake Seamen's Union, 
No. 8400, is inquiring for his brother, John 
Douglas, who is supposed to have been seen 
recently in the Puget Sound country. He 
is 5 feet 8 inches in height, brown hair, blue 
eyes, fair complexion. Address Lake Sea- 
men's Union, 143 W. Madison street, Chicago. 

Members of the crew of the Olympia at 
the time of the accident to Charles Johnson, 
No. 4620, Lake Seamen's Union, while lying 
at the Lehigh Valley Coal Dock, in Su- 
perior, Wis., on August 23, 1907, are re- 
quested to send their addresses to the Head- 
quarters of the Lake Seamen's Union, Chi- 
cago, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 8742. 

ASHLAND, Wis 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone. Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Third Street 

OfiliUNRBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, Ont.. Canada Box 235 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 



SUB-AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, Pa 222 State Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, O 510 Meigs Street 



Demand the union label on all products. 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT. MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELINK STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Esi anaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Wis. Sheboygan, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Ray, Wis. 

Ludlngton, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



0>\ST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TRADE DISPUTES ACT. 



It is provided by the British Trades Dis 
putc Act, 1906, thai an act done by a person 
in contemplation or furtherance of a trade 
dispute shall net be actionable on the ground 
only thai it induces some other person to 
break a contract "f employment, or that it 
is an interference with the trade, business, 

(if employment i if s< "lie other persi >n. or with 
the right of some other person to dispose of 
his capital or his labor as he wills. The 
expression, "trade dispute," is defined to 
mean any dispute between employers and 
workmen, or between workmen and work- 
men, which is connected with the employ- 
ment or non-employment, or the terms oi 
employment, or with the conditions of labor, 
of any person; and the expression, "work- 
men." means all persons employed in trade 
or industry, whether or not in the employ- 
ment of the employer with whom a trade 
dispute arises. 

A workman, employed as a boiler sealer, 
while a member of a trade union, was 
ordered by the union to pay a fine of Ids., 
which he refused to do. Some time later 
he became an employer, and ceased to be a 
member of the union. In 1907 he ceased to 

be an employer, and again, after an interval 
of some years, became a member of the 
union, the fine imposed upon him still re- 
maining unpaid. In these' circumstances, a 
delegate of the union went to see the fore- 
man at the works where the workman hail 
obtained employment, and told the foreman 
that he had better stop the workman or else 
there would be trouble with the men, as 
there was trouble between the workman and 
the union about money matters. The work- 
man was accordingly dismissed from his em- 
ployment, and thereupon broughl an action 
in the County Court against the delegate to 
recover damages from him on the ground 
that he had maliciously, by threats and 
coercive acts, procured his dismissal from 
the employment. The defense was that tin- 
defendant had not been guilty of the acts 
complained of; and further that if he had, 
there was a trade dispute, and he was pro- 
tected by the Act. In answer to questions 
left to them by the judge, the jury found: 
(1) that there was not a trade dispute ex- 
isting or contemplated by the men; (2) that 
the delegate had uttered a threat to the 
plaintiff's employer; (3) that what he did 
prevented, or was intended to prevent, the 
plaintiff from getting or retaining employ- 
ment ; (4) that it was done in order to com- 
pel the plaintiff to pay arrears of the fine; 
(5) that it was done in order to punish the 
plaintiff for not paying such arrears; (<>) 
that what the defendant did was not done 
only to warn the employers that the union 
men would leave in consequence of their 
being unwilling to work with the plaintiff; 
(7) that it was not done in consequence of 
the men objecting to work with the plain- 
tiff; and (8) that the defendant did 
thing more than act on behalf of the men 
employed along with the plaintiff. The 
jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff for 
£50 damages, and the County Court judge 
refused to order a new trial. The defendant 
appealed to the High Court, but the High 
Court dismissed the appeal. The defend- 
ant accordingly appealed further to the 
Court of Appeal. 

The Court of Appeal held that the Act 
applies to any act done by any person, 
whether an employer or a workman, or un- 



connected with either. If there was no ex- 
isting trade dispute the act is justified, 
whether it prevents a contemplated dispute 
from arising, or stimulates it. If a trade 
dispute has arisen, the act must be in fur- 
therance of it. "In contemplation" includes 
an act done with a view of bringing about 
a trade dispute. It was plain from the 
fourth and fifth findings of the jury that 
there must have been an existing trade dis- 
pute, "in furtherance" of which the threats 
were uttered, for there clearly was a dispute 
between some workmen and the plaintiff 
arising out of the non-payment of the line. 
The threat also might be considered as in 
mplation of another trade dispute, 
namely, a dispute between the employers 
and the union men in case the plaintiff con- 
tinued to work. Therefore, the action 
against the defendant could not succeed, as 
he was protected by the Act. The appeal 
was therefore allowed. — Conway vs. Wade, 
Court of Appeal, July 30. 1908. 



DAMAGES FOR FIREMAN'S DEATH. 



Compensation is payable tinder the British 
Workmen's Compensation Act, 1906, to a 
workman injured in the course of his em- 
ployment, only where the injury is caused by 
an "accident." The Act applies to seamen 
who are members of the crew of any ship 
registered in the United Kingdom. 

A British steamship, when about to sail 
from a foreign port, was found to be three 
men short, and the captain applied to a mis- 
sion to supply the deficiency. One of the 
three' men sent by the mission was engaged 
as a "trimmer" in the stokehold. This man 
was in a very emaciated condition, and had 
been starving when he applied to the mis- 
sion for work, lie had never done the work 
of a trimmer before. On the day after join- 
ing the ship he was put to rake out ashes 
which had fallen from a furnace when he fell 
down unconscious as the result of "heal 
stroke." The ventilation of the stokehold 
was in proper order, and the conditions of 
the employment were quite normal, but the 

temperature was. as usual, very high, reach- 
ing 96 degrees. The man died from ex- 
haustion two hours afterward. His widow 
subsequently claimed compensation, and the 
Recorder of Belfast made an award of £162 
in her favor. The medical evidence showed 
that owing to the deceased man's low vital- 
ity from starvation he was unable to with- 
stand the high normal temperature of the 
stokehold. The shipowners appealed against 
the decision of the Recorder, but the Court 
of Appeals in Ireland confirmed his award. 
The shipowners then appealed to the House 
of Lords. 

It was argued on behalf of the appellants 
that the death could not be- said to have been 
caused by an accident. The House of Lords, 
however, dismissed the appeal, holding that 
the death had been caused by an accident 
within the meaning of the Act. They were 
of opinion that the weakness of the de- 
ceased, which predisposed him to heat 
stroke, was immaterial; that the can- 
death was a heat stroke coming suddenly 
and unexpectedly upon him while at work; 
that such stroke was an unusual effect of ;, 
known cause, often threatened though usu- 
ally averted; and that as this man's inex- 
perience prevented him from avoiding the 
danger he came within the protection of the 
Act. — Ismay, Imrie & Co. vs. Williamson, 
House of Lords, July 31, 1908. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATFORM. 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and at not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership oi public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Ranks. 

Ir^ERNAtrONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

(Continued from Pape 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO. Cal., 44-46 East St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER. B. C, Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts.. 
1'. O. Box 1335. 

TACOMA, Wash., 221K North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash.. 1.U2 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash.. 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Rox 48. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 334. 
PORTLAND. Or., ru Union Ave. 
EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 
SAN PEDRO, Cat.. P. O. Box 2380. 
HONOLULU, It. T.. X2i Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE. Wash., Colman Dock. Room 10, P. O. 
Box 875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash.. P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal.. 200 M St. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



TRADE-UNION ACTS. 



It is provided by the British Trade- 
Union Act, 1871, that the rules of every 
trade-union shall be registered, and that 
such rules shall contain (among- other 
things) the whole of the objects for which 
the trade-union is established, and the pur- 
poses for which the funds are applicable. 

A trade-union of railway men was formed, 
the objects of which, according to the rules, 
were to improve the condition and protect 
the interests of its members ; to obtain fair 
wages and reasonable hours of work, and 
to promote good understanding between em- 
ployers and employed; to provide various 
benefits for its members; and to use every 
effort to provide for the safety of railway 
work and railway traffic. The rules of the 
union also provided that no new rule should 
be made, nor any existing rule amended or 
altered, except at the annual general meet- 
ing every third year. They also provided 
for the representation in Parliament of the 
society, and for subscriptions from members 
to pay the expenses of candidates for Par- 
liament and to pay salaries to those who 
should be elected. The rules further con- 
tained this provision: "All candidates shall 
sign and accept the conditions of the Labor 
Party and be subject to their Whip." 

At the annual general meeting of ( )ctober, 
1905, the rules had been altered. At the 
annual general meeting of 1906 they had 
been again altered, and the words just cited 
had then been added. The conditions of 
the Labor Party referred to in those words 
were contained in a printed document issued 
by that party. The rules as altered in 1900 
were duly registered. 

The secretary of a local branch of the 
union brought an action against the union 
for a declaration that it was outside the 
powers of the union to raise funds, or use 
them, for the purpose of supporting mem- 
bers of Parliament pledged to support a cer- 
tain party, the policy of which might not be 
in accordance with the interests or general 
purposes of the union. He also alleged that 
the alteration of the rules in 1906 was be- 
yond the powers of the union, and he asked 
for an injunction to restrain the union and 
its trustees from using the funds in the man- 
ner objected to. 

The judge decided that once the rules had 
been registered no one could go behind 
them, so far as regarded the question 
whether or not they had been properly 
passed by the society, and were binding 
upon its members. But the question 
whether or not they were within the powers 
of the society was one which the court 
would determine. In this case, it was ad- 
mitted that the application of the funds of 
the society toward procuring Parliamentary 
representation in the interest of its mem- 
bers was within their powers. The society 
were entitled to use their votes in order to 
influence the course of legislation where it 
touched the relation between employer and 
employed, the safety of railway work, and 
the interests of the members of the society. 
In selecting candidates to represent the so- 
ciety in Parliament, the members have to 
determine whether it is in their interest that 
such candidates should go to Parliament as 
independent members or whether they 
should go as supporters of some definite 
political party. A member of Parliament 
can not bind himself, either legally or mor- 



ally, by any pledge with regard to his fu- 
ture conduct, but must in all circumstances 
follow the dictation of his own conscience. 
It is a matter of discretion which must be 
left to the majority of the members of the 
union whether they shall require from their 
candidates or not the pledge to support a 
particular party. It is entirely a question 
of policy, the wisdom or folly of which is 
a question for those members, and which 
will not be inquired into by a court of jus- 
tice. If they think it the best course, trade- 
unions are entitled to affiliate themselves to, 
or support, any political party they choose. 
Therefore the court could not interfere with 
the using of the funds of the society in the 
manner alleged, and judgment must be for 
the defendants.; — Osborne vs. The Amalga- 
mated Society of Railway Servants of Eng- 
land, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, Chan- 
cery Division. July 21, 1908. 



COURT OF ARBITRATION. 



The President of the British Board of 
Trade is causing the following memorandum 
to be communicated to chambers of com- 
merce and employers' and workmen's asso- 
ciations : 

1. Under the Conciliation Act of 1896, 
the Board of Trade has power to appoint 
a conciliator in trade disputes and an arbi- 
trator at the request of both parties. These 
slender means of intervention have been 
employed in cases where opportunity has 
offered, and the work of the department in 
this sphere has considerably increased of 
recent years. In 1905 the Board of Trade 
intervened in 14 disputes and settled them 
all ; in 1906 they intervened in 20 cases and 
settled 16; in 1907 they intervened in 39 cases 
and settled 32; while during the first eight 
months of the present year no fewer than 
47 cases of intervention have occurred, of 
which 35 have been already settled, while 
some of the remainder are still being dealt 
with. 

2. It is not proposed to curtail or replace 
any of the existing functions or practices 
under the Conciliation Act, nor in any re- 
spect to depart from its voluntary and per- 
missive character. The good offices of the 
department will still be available to all in- 
dustrial circles for the settlement of dis- 
putes whenever opportunity offers ; single 
arbitrators and conciliators will still be ap- 
pointed whenever desired; special interven- 
tions will still be undertaken in special cases, 
and no element of compulsion will enter into 
any of these proceedings. But the time has 
now arrived when the scale of these opera- 
tions deserves, and indeed requires, the 
creation of some more formal and perma- 
nent machinery; and, with a view to con- 
solidating, expanding and popularizing the 
working of the Conciliation Act, I propose 
to set up a Standing Court of Arbitration. 

3. The court, which will sit wherever re- 
quired, will be composed of three (or five) 
members, according to the wishes of the 
parties, with fees and expenses to members 
of the court and to the chairmen during sit- 
tings. The court will be nominated by the 
Board of Trade from three panels. The firsi 
panel — of chairmen — will comprise persons 
of eminence and impartiality. The second 
will be formed of persons who, while pre- 
serving an impartial mind in regard to tin- 
particular dispute, arc nevertheless drawn 
from the "employer class." The third 



panel will be formed of persons similarly 
drawn from the class of workmen and trade- 
unionists. It is hoped that this composition 
will remove from the court the reproach 
which workmen have sometimes brought 
against individual conciliators and arbi- 
trators, that, however fair they mean to be, 
they do not intimately understand the posi- 
tion of the manual laborer. It is believed 
that by the appointment of two arbitrators 
selected from the employers' panel and two 
from the workmen's panel in difficult cases. 
thus constituting a court of five instead of 
three persons, the decisions of the court 
would be rendered more authoritative, es- 
pecially to the workmen, who, according to 
the information of the Board of Trade, are 
more read} - to submit to the judgment of 
two of their representatives than of one. As 
the personnel of the court would be con- 
stantly varied, there would be no danger of 
the court itself becoming unpopular with 
either class in consequence of any particular 
decision; there would he no difficulty in 
choosing members quite unconnected with 
the case in dispute, and no inconvenient 
labor would be imposed upon anyone who 
consented to serve on the panels. Lastly, in 
order that the peculiar conditions of any 
trade may be fully explained to the court, 
technical assessors may be appointed by the 
Hoard of Trade at the request of the court 
or of the parties to assist in the delibera- 
tions, but without any right to vote. 

4. The state of public opinion upon the 
general question of arbitration in trade dis- 
putes may be very conveniently tested by 
such a voluntary arrangement. Careful in- 
quiry through various channels open to the 
Board of Trade justifies the expectation that 
the plan would not be unwelcome in indus- 
trial circles. The court will only be called 
into being if, and in proportion as, it is 
actually wanted. No fresh legislation is 
necessary. 

5. Steps will now be taken to form the 
respective panels. 



BOUGHT BIG CARFERRY. 



A telegram from Detroit announces the 
sale to the Grand Trunk railway system of 
the carferry Manistique. It is also stated 
that this boat will be placed on the regular 
Milwaukee-Grand Haven route of the Grand 
Trunk system, between October 1 and 15, 
running opposite to the present carferry, the 
Grand Haven, which has been operated for 
several years past by the Grand Trunk-Mil- 
waukee Carferry Company. 

The purchase for its Milwaukee service of 
the Manistique means that the Grand Trunk 
svstem is preparing for largely increased 
traffic to and from Milwaukee. 

It is understood that the Manistique, 
which was built five years ago at a cost of 
$412,200, becomes the property of the Grand 
Trunk for $300,000. It is known as a thirty- 
two-car boat, having track room on the 
"lower deck for that number of standard sized 
freight cars. 

The Manistique was built in Cleveland in 
1903, for the Manistique & Northern road, 
by which it was operated for several years 
between Manistique and Ludington. She is 
338 feet in length. The name will be 
changed to Milwaukee.. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



12 



C( 'AST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA, CAL. 



The United States battleship Heel 
sailed from Manila, P. [., or October 
10 for Japan. 

No shore leave was granted the 
crews of the United States battleship 
fleet at Manila. P. L, owing to the 
prevalence of cholera in that port. 

The steamship Prinz August Wil- 
helni arrived at Kingston, Ja., on 
September 21 from New York and 
reported having spoken the schooner 
William J. Lermond near Turks Is- 
land, all safe. 

Several midshipmen in the United 
States battleship fleet now cruising 
around the world have been court- 
martialed and sentenced to dismissal 
for drunkenness while on duty in 
Australian ports. 

The Pilots' Association, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa., fearing a clash with the 
State Navigation Commission, has re- 
versed its former defiant -l ' 10 and 
accepted the apprentice chosen by the 
In i.ird. 

The United States battleships \t 
lanta and Maine sailed from Naples, 
Italy, on September 2d. for Gibraltar. 
\s they steamed out of the harbor 
they were saluted by the German and 
Brazilian warships. 

The North German-I.loyd Steam- 
ship George Washington, is to be 
launched at Bremen on October 31. 
This vessel will be the largest steam- 
ship Hying the German Hag. being 777 
feet long, with a tonnage of 2 

The steamer Commonwealth, of the 
Fall River line, collided with 
sunk the Norwegian freight steamer 

V'olund in a dense fog off Race Rock, 
at the eastern entrance to Long Isl- 
and Sound, on September 26. No 
lives were lost. 

Daily sailings between New York 
and the leading ports of Europe, both 
east and westbound, are proposed by- 
General Manager Rallin. of the I 
burg-American line, as a practical 
means for abolishing the prevailing 
Unprofitable competition between the 
five leading transatlantic lines. 

The steerage trade reported by the 

Atlantic steamship conference shows 
for the third consecutive week a bal- 
ance in favor of the westward move- 
ment. This is regarded in maritime 
circles as indicating that the tremen- 
dous eastward movement of labor 
which has been going on all the 
is ending. 

Captain Nelson, of tin- tug Wil- 
mington, arrived at Beaufort, N. C, 

on October 4. and reported that when 

twenty miles northeast of Frying Pan 
Shoal he passed a sunken three- 
masted sell ler with fore and main 

masts showing above water and miz- 
zen mast broken off at surface of the 
sea. 

The palatial passenger steamship 
Cleveland, built lor the Hamburg 
American service between New York, 
England and the Continent, was 
launched on September 22. at the 
shipyard of Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, 
Germany. The Cleveland and her sis- 
ter ship, the Cincinnati, launched m 
July, are INftO tons register and have 
a speed of 16 knots. 

The Norwegian bark Fox, which 
had been abandoned by her crew in 
mid-ocean apparently after having 
been in collision with some 
craft, was towed to New York on 
September 28 by the British tank 
steamship Luciline. Nothing is known 
of the fate of the crew of the Fox. 
There were evidences that the bark 
had been hastily abandoned 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the eity. county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Syrups, Barsaparllla and Iron, 
tits for Jackson's Napa 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, - Eureka, Cal. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 




Foul Catarrh 

DEAFNESS, DYSPEPSIA, BLINDNESS, 
BAD BLOOD, DISEASE, DEATH, FOL- 
LOW THE RAVAGES OF FOUL 
CATARRH. 

Upon request we will send an abso- 
lutely free treatment which we know- 
will immediately benefit any catarrh suf- 
ferer, no matter how long standing the 
disease may be. Not a patent nostrum, 
but a scientific remedy, put up from a 
specialist's prescription and guaranteed 
to be absolutely free from cocaine, mor- 
phine, chloroform or opiates of any kind. 
It's use is positively safe. If you want a 

Free Treatment 

all you need do is send your name and 
address at once to E. L. Baldwin, Phar., 
20-S Market St., San Francisco. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cai. 

A. K. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET. COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 

is. Shoes. Rubber and Oil Cloth- 

inK. Trunks. Valises, etc. 

ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

23 N. Third Street, near Burnside 

Portland, Oregon. 




WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE "ALOHA" 

Harry Klemme, Proprietor. 

First-Class Rooms at very moderate 
rates. Summer garden attached. 

Cor. Queen and Richard Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



Can You 
Read A 
Sextant? 



Can you navigate? Are you capa- 
ble of holding an officer's berth? If 
not, a 5-miilion dollar institution of- 
fers to teach you these things: to 
enable you to exchange the fore- 
castle for the cabin: salt-horse and 
hard-tack for officers' mess, and 
dancing to the tune of the boat- 
swain's pipe for the responsibility 
of the bridge. No textbooks to buy. 
No education necessary but the 
ability to read and write English. 
Pay what you can afford. It puts 
you under no obligation to send in 
the coupon asking us how we can 
help you. DO IT NOW. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period If 
not called or sent for. 

Aheng, C. Kuntz, K. 

Allen, J. W. Larsen, H. J. 

Andersen, Albert Lattz, L. 

Anderson, A. P. Lohme, E. 

Anderson, HJalmar Larson, F., -1098 

Anderson, J., -1514 Lebrun, E. 

Anderson, A. Leaky, W.. -'ji:< 

Anderson, Victor Leisman, J. 

Axes, P. Lepp, E. 

Barry, Thomas Lie, J. C. 

Baandsen, E. M. Lind, H. E. 

Barwa, D. Lindin, II. Van 

Bakke, M. C. Lindburg, John 

Bateman, S. J. Lindman. H. C. 

Bernard, S. Lindroos, C. 

Benners, Lichlenberg, Max 

Bensen. J. E. Lockey, H. 

Berg. H. M. Lunder. B. 

Bergren, John Lundqulst, J. 

Bertelsen, Alf. Lubeck. R. A. 

Bernsen, C. T. Lundblad, E.. -789 

Berkelund, R. Madison, Chas. 

Blomquist, B. Marthisen. M. 

Blomquist, H. Mayers, P. M. 

Boman, O. W. Mannlan, James 

Brander, M. F. Marthininsaen, K. 

Bruhn, B., -1430 McKerron, W. 

Buchtman, P. McAdam, J. 

Burke, James Meddicott, F. 

Casperson, Chr. Mikelson, C. 

Cornell, G. B. Mikkelson, Jos. 

Clarkson, C. H. Mortensen, Chr. 

Courtney, A. I. Mortensen, Holger 

Conigan, P. J. Mare. C. F. 

Derrick, Geo. Murphy, D. 

Dinwooden, Jas. H. Myren, A. 

Donovan, James Nelsen, Martin 

Dowling, S. G. Newland, E. 

Drager, Otto Nielsen, Jorgen 
Edwards, E. M., -149Nielsen, Karl 

Edvardson, John Nielsen, N. C. 

Ekvall, G. A. Nyburg, Eric 

Ellingsen. P., -568 Olsson, E.,-966 

Elwood, Alf. Olsson, Johan 

Elliasen, H. O. Olsson. Otto 

Emersen, E. Olsen, H., -959 

Falch, O. A. Olsson, Ose:ir 

Faluck, L. Orchard, S. H. 

Farley, Geo. Overvik. Thos. 

Fitzgerald, H. Paulson. Paul 

Flynn, P. J. Petterson, O., -710 

Fournier, G. Petersen, Olavus 

Frohery, F. Pederse, Lars 

Gad, V. Pedersen, O. A. 

Gent, A. C. Pedersen, Kristian 

Gilifson. Frank Pendville, N. 

Gronlund, Oscar Pemberton, 1 1. 

Grusden, Edw. Pietanzo, A. 

Gustafson, A. W.,Pfeifer. K. 

-700 Paige. L. 

Gudmundsen, J. Rasmussen, F. 

Guttman, H. Rasmussen, N. C. 

Gulliver, W. H. -924 

Hehkonen. G. A. Sanches, F. 

Hansen, Jens M. Schulz, E.. -1842 

Hansen, E. A. Sibelin. Chr. 

Hansen, Mike Siverksen. S. B. 

Hattness, M. Shane, J. 

Hagman, H. Sovig, C. 

Healey, James Soderlund, J. F. 

Helman, Karl Stuho, M. 

Hixon, J. W. Steinburg, A. 

Hange, A. Sundquist, C. 

Haygard, T. S. Svensen. J. 

Holmgren, G. J. Swensson, B. 

Huslide, H. Taxt, Thos. 

Ivertsen, S. B. Tellefsen, P. 

Iversen. P. Tennant, T. 

Jamison, J. Thompson, R. 

Jacobson, H. J. Thoralls. L. M. 

Jack, Paul Tuominen, Alf. 

Jasperson, J. Vagnhill, G. 

Jensen. Johannes Wnhlstedt. A. R. 

Johansen. C. J. Wablstedt. G. R. 

Johnson. Gunder Wankie. F. 

Johansen, Carsten Walz. E. 

Jaimson, Nils Wallace, A. 

Jerfold, Theo. Webber, C. 

Joakinson, W. Whitley, A. 

Johnson, Alf. Winsmer, Geo. 

Karlson. K. A., -551Williamson. A. 

Knlmlng, J. Waulters, H. 

Kalnou, A. Worm, A. 

Kahlbetzer, F. Walters, W r . 

Kleine, Carl Wokes, H. 

Klingenburg, J.. -660Zimmer, W. 

Krlstoftersen, Geo. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Jack Kittilsen is inquired for by 
Chas. Johnson, South Island, George- 
town Co., S. C. 



International Correspondence Schools 

Box 898, Scranton, Pa. 

Please send me the free booklet "1001 Stories of Suc- 
cess." and explain, without further obligation on 



my part, how I can 


qualify for position 


before which I have marked X. 


Muter 


Civil Service Exams. 


First Oflloer 


Bookkeeper 


Second Otflctr 


Stenographer 


Potty Officer 


Electrics! Engineer 


Chief Engineer 


Mechanical Engineer 


First Assist. Engineer 


Civil Engineer 


Second Assist. Engineer 


Architect 


Lake Captain 


Machinist 


Pilot 


Electrician 


Marino Engineer 


French l Wllh 


Mechanical Draltemen 


German \ Edison 


English Branches 


Spanish ) Phonograph 



If the position you wish to gain is not in the list, 

state what it Is here. 

Name _ 

St. & No 

City 



State. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

A. L. Shaube, who was 2nd mate 
on the steam-schooner San Pedro, in 
the collision with Columbia, is in- 
quired for. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Ed. Larsen, also known ns Edward 
Torkelscn, last heatd of in the bark 
Hesper in 1893, is inquired for by hi' 
brother, Jonas. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Olaf Johanneson, a native of Sei- 
desfjord, Iceland, last heard of on the 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address S. J. Westdal, 51 
South street, New York City. 

Charles Johannes, a native of Ber- 
lin, Ontario, aged about 35, supposed 
to be on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Charles Porter, Fred Choate and 
Soren Sorensen, who were wrecked in 
the Maggie C. Russ, are requested to 
call upon Attorney H. W. Hutton, 
Pacific Building, San Francisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &t CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Alexander & McBride 

103 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL, GOODS. 

'PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents* Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Oscar Sunersson, last heard of 
about four years ago when employed 
in a tug at San Francisco, is inquired 
for by his brother. Address, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots. Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Chang'e of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., of Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, - SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 

494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



K. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light blue) 
appears on the box in which 
you are served. 




_.SEPU880 t ._ 
Issued by AuiBoiityof tne Cigar Maners' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars 

(ElliS dfftif U$. Tint ttie Cttin contained Inuils box Inn been made by a NIjHIJSS WfolNUl 

a BEMtlR OF THE MAR MAKERS •IIIIfJWATIOKU. UNION of Alltnu, in orjareatjoe devoted to the ad- 
vance mi of the MORAl.MA! EHIAljmJ 1NILLUCTUAI WlllAHI Of THE CKATT. Therefore we rnxmaett) 



these. 0«rs to all smokers Uirouohout the world 
All InfrirujtsieQU upon this Label edl be punished according to Law 



FAX 
**■ SIMILE 



$ 7tC rfltJtuu!, fttadtnt, 

' C.Jf/.C/tl 



fAmmc* 



..*«'.. ImU; **i law . **.,'M-. taC ~M iJ^ * (Ci tC {aaB.ijiJjejjB 




BY INSISTING UPON PURCHAS- 
ING UNION STAMP SHOES 

You help better shoemaking conditions. 
You get better shoes for the money. 
You help your own Labor Position. 
You abolish Child Labor. 

Do Not Be Misled by retailers who 
say: "This shoe does not bear the 
stamp, but is made under Union Condi- 
tions." 

This is false. No shoe is union-made 
unless it bears the Union Stamp. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



Labor News. 



For the first time in a number of 
months the shops of the Burlington 
Railroad at Burlington, la., are run- 
ning full handed and on full hours. 

The 300 employes of the Merion 
Woolen Mills, at West Conshohocken, 
N. J., reported for a full week's work- 
recently, the firsl since last Novem- 
ber. 

The strike on the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad is reported to have been of- 
ficially declared off on October 4. 
The terms <>f settlement have not yet 
been made public. 

Notices were recently posted at the 
Nashua and Jackson Cotton Mills at 
Nashua. N. 11., announcing a resump 
tion of work on full time. Nearly 
4000 operatives are affected. 

The death record among the coal 
miners during the year was greater 
by 1033 than in 1906, and it is said to 
have been the worst year in the his- 
tory of the coal-mining industry. 

Accidents in coal mines of the 
United States during last year re- 
sulted in the death of 3125 men and in- 
jury of 5316 more, according to sta- 
tistics made public by the Geological 
Survey. 

Representatives of the coal miners 
of Washington and the coal opera- 
tors met at Seattle on October 7 and 
signed an agreement for the present 
scale to be in force for the next two 
years. 

That Japanese labor is gaing a foot- 
hold and working its way east from 
the Pacific Coast is the opinon stated 
by W. J. Bowse, Attorney-General 
of British Columbia, in an interview 
at Toronto. 

Dr. Lawrence Flick, John Mitchell 
and Samuel Gompers were among the 
speakers at a meeting in the interest 
of the laboring man, held at Wash- 
ington. D. C, as a feature of the 
Tuberculosis Exposition. 

General Manager Bury of the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway has agreed to the 
proposal of the striking machinists 
to take them all back. The company 
has shipped all of the strikebreakers 
back to the East and South and all 
of the strikers went to work on Octo- 
ber 7. 

In the Juvenile Court at Washing- 
ton, D. C, on October 1, Judge De 
Lacey rendered a decision concerning 
the Act to regulate child labor in the 
District of Columbia, and decided 
that newspapers or journals, in the 
sense in which they are named in the 
Act, are not merchandise. 

President Roosevelt, on October 3, 
discussed the political situation with 
1'. II. Morrissey, Grand Chief of the 
Kail way Trainmen, and Daniel J. 
Keefe, President of the International 
Longshoremen's .Association. The re- 
sult of the conference has not been 
made public. 

The Central Federated Union of 
Xew York City has accepted the offer 
of Herman Ridder, publisher of a 
German daily paper, to submit the di 
pule between himself and his em- 
ployes to arbitration. James M. 
Lynch, President of the International 
Typographical Union, will act as ar- 
bitrator. 

The open hearth Furnaces of the 

Carnegie Steel Works at Homestead. 
I'a., and two departments of the 
Howard Axle Works started to run 
on double turn on September 21 for 
the first time since last October. It 
is said the Carnegie Plate Mills will 
also go on double turn. Several 
thousand men arc benefited by the re- 
sumption. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The 225th anniversary of the 
i uncling of Philadelphia was cele 
bra ted by elaborate cermonies in that 
city beginning on I Ictober 4. 

Two hundred thousand persons 
took advantage of the opening oi 
820,000 acres of free Government 
land in South I Dakota on < Ictober 5. 

The prohibition wave caused a re- 
duction of about $6,000,000 to United 
States internal revenue from alcoholic 
liquors and tobacco in July and An 
gust. 

The directors of the Northern Pa 
cific KaiU\;,\ Company on October 8 
declared the regular quarterly divi- 
dend of 1-V| per cent. All retiring 
officers were re-elected. 

\ New York Stock Exchange 
was sold "ii September 30 for $65,000, 
which is $3000 less than the last pre 
\iuus sale, and about $20,000 less than 
was paid before la^t year's depression 
began. 

Democratic National Chairman 
Mack has announced in New York 
thai a fund nf $5000 has been set 
aside to prosecute employers who 

seek tu Coerce their nun to VOfr 
against Bryan. 

The Board "f Directors nf the Mis 
souri, Kansas and Texas Railroad 
Company, at a special meeting at New 
York mi October 8, declared the regu 
lar semi-annual dividend nf 2 per cent 
(in the preferred stock. 

The reduced rate nf postage mi let- 
ters sent from the United States to 
Great Britain and vice versa went 
into effect nn October 1. The rate 

is now tWO cent-- per mince, instead 
of live cents per half mince. 

Tile sixth triennial Congress mi 
Tuberculosis met at Washington, I). 
C, on September 28. Representatives 
were present from many countries. 
Dr. Robert Koch, the discoverer of 
the tubercular bacilli, represented the 
German Government. 

The Building Code Revision Com 
mission, of New York City, recom 
mends that the height nf building 
restricted to 300 feet, except in the 
nf structures fronting mi a park, 
square or plaza, for which the limit 
shall lie 3511 feet. 

The arbitration treaty between 
China and the United States was 
signed at Washington, I). C, mi 
October 8 by Wu Ting Fang mi be- 
half of the Chinese Government and 
Secretary Root mi behalf of the 
American ( lovernment. 

A prediction made by Congressman 
James A. Tavvncy before the Fire Un- 
derwriters' meeting in Chicago that 
tlie Panama Canal would be completed 
in six years at a total cost of $256,000,- 
(XX), has been confirmed by Colonel 
Goetlials. chief engineer in charge of 
the work. 

At the annual meeting of the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway shareholders, 
held at Montreal, Can., mi i ictober 
7, it was voted to ask the -auction of 
the Government of Canada to the 
raising of $50,000,000 of new capital 
for the company, bringing the ordi 
nary stock up to $200,000,(11111. 

Telegraphic advices have been re- 
ceived at the headquarters of the Sig- 
nal Corps to the effect that all wire- 
less installations at Nome, F.gbert, 
Gibbon, Fairbanks and Circle City, 
Alaska, are in working order and 
ready for business, except Nome, 
where there has been some trouble 
with the transformers which can be 
remedied soon. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letie:s at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union advertised for three 

ths only and will be returned to the 

Posi <i ii' ■■ at i in- expiration of five 
months .mm date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
i'. Suharn nbei g, I feadquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Aas.-n. All 
Alksn.-. A.Ug. 

Andersen, -1252 

a ndi-i sen, -1171 

Andersen, -1560 

Andersen, i>. 

Anderson, -1562 

Anderson, John 

Anderson, L. II. 
ison, - 1 391 
Andersson, -X481 
Asmussen, -1116 
Atkinson, s. 
Aaltonen, R. 
Abraham sen, 
Adams. 1>. J. 
Banke, -1646 

an, Ernest 
ia i ker, Fred w. 
P. 

ends, G. 

ens, Fred 
Bensen, -143 
Bensen, B. 
Bensen, H. 
Benson, -14. r i4 

in, .John E. 
it, H ugo 
Bernert, Fred 
Barber, A. A. 
Baxter, W. 
Benson, Victor 
Berg, Julius 
Bjork, A. Edward 
Bjorklund, Erik 
Campbell, Geo. 
Christensen, Wm. 
Christensen, Viggo 
Christensen, -'J05 
Carlson, J. 

758 
Carlstrom, Arvid 
Carstensen, M. 
Christophersen, Chris 

I -allien, Hugo 
I lahlof, John 
I lanberg, A. 
Danielscn, Sigurd 
l . Baers, Henry 
den Haan, C. 
Dahlman, J. A. 
Duran, K. 
Kaston, R. W. 
Ekendahl, -565 
Ekholm, Kians 
Eklund, Ellis 
EUefsen, Andreas 
Engman, Chas. 
Eriksen, -4M 
Eriksen, -595 
Falk, John A. 
Fait, Knut 
Figvcd, Sigurd 
Findley, H. 
Fjelman, Jonas 
Gad, Sophus 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
< lonzalez, Juan 
i '.ere, A. 
Gillliolm, Albin 
Govan, A. 
Grant, John 
Grawert, Johan 
Gudmansen, A. B. 

Gllstafssoll. G. B. 
Ilaak, R. 
Hagbartsen, M. 
Haler, Fred 
Hall, W. F. 
llammargrin, O. 
Hansen, Marius 
1 la risen, Karl 
Hansen, -777 
Harris, John E. 
Harris, J. 
I Fansen, Han ild O. 
I lansen, -1 !50 
Hansen, -1267 
Hansen, 1576 
l [araldsen, i 
Isaacson, G. E. 
lversen, Andreas 
Jameson, Joe 
Janson, -1779 
Jarvie, W. 
Jensen, Jas. B. 
Jensen, Niels E. 
Jensen, Jens P. 
Jensen, -1578 
Jensen, -1634 
Johansen, Joakim 
Johansen, Theo. 
Johansen, A. F. 
Johanson, Elis R. 
Johansen, Sigurd 

sen, C. L. 
Johansen, tljalmar 
Johansson, F. 
Jaansen, -1555 

.n. -1341 
Jansson, -1H7 
Jensen, Geo. I.. 

innesen, Johan 
Jonannesen, Martin 
Kaasik, A. 
Kahlbetzer, Ferd 
Kalnls, Harry 
Kane. G. 
Kohne. Ernst 
Kersteln, Carl 
Kllnt, Herman 

n, Karl J. 
Karlson, -I15S 
Karl son. c. e. 

Kailsson. N. 

Karsberg, C. 
Kastberg, Karsten 
Kamp, -762 
Karlgren, -644 

I.aanti. Moses 
Lagerberg, Chas. 
Lahmeyer, ll. 
Landgren, J. 
Lang, Chas. 



Alvarez, F. Lopez 
Andersen, A. Emil 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Carl 
Anderson, Olaf 
Anderson, C. 
Anderson, A. C. 
Anderson, ll. A. 
Anderssen, -1298 

lasen, M. 
Andersson, -1246 
s,,n. 1552 
Andreassen, -1834 
Anenson. 
Aske, John 

Ltkinson, Samuel 
Axelsen, Axel 
Beyerle, Ruppert 

aigen, P. 
Boisen, J. 
Boogren, Erie 
Borresen, Niels 
Boss, L. A. 
Rowland, Chas. 
Brandt, Fred 
Brown, John 
Burger. A. 
Burke, Eugi 
Burmeister. T. F. 
Burnett. Chas. C. 
Burns. Chas. E. 
Bregler, Pred 

L142 
Bryde, Chas. 

Burr, ('. C. 



Christoffersen, Berge 
Christoffersen, -Gn 
Clarke, R.. -1117 

Coadon, -481 
Corneliusen, Jens 

tensen, . i [arold 
Classen, Henry 
Coakley, John 

Dikender, M. 
Dories, H. 
Dowe, John 
Dryden, Wm. 
1 nines, Budv. E. 
Duke, E. T. 
Dybsland, Paul T, 

Eriksen, Leonard 
Erickson, Mike 
Erickson, -493 
Eriksen, Edmund 
Eriksson, -333 
Eskildsen, N. P. 
Evenseii, Andrew 

Foss, Laurits L. 
Frosch, Wm. 
Friebel, Herman 
Frivold, John 
Fuchel, Gustav 
Guillou, Joseph 
Guldberg, Randolf 
Gundersen, Johan 
Gundersen, Tandrup 
Gunderson, Christ 
Gunn, Bert 
Gustafsson, J. E. 
Guzek, B. 
Gunnarson, Jolin 

Haupt, Emil 

Hess, August 
Hill, G. 
Hines. Jas. 
Hjort, Knut 
Hochmann, Aleck 
Hohman, H. 
Hoist, R. 
Holland. E. Scott 
Holt, Karl C. 

Hutchinson, Ed. 
Hendriksen, Adolf 

1 lilal i 

Hynes, Jas. ,i. 

lversen, Iver 

Johansson, -1G77 
Johansson, Nils 
Johnsen. Edward 
Johnsen, J. P. K 
Johnson, -1877 
Johnson, - 
Johnson, John l-:. 
Johnson, G. Edwin 
Johnson, John 
Johnson. Chas. 
Johnson. J. E. 
Jones, Magnus P. 
Jones, P. 
Jurgensen. H. 
Justersen, Peter 
Johansen, a, 
Johansen, E. R. 
Johansen, -1843 
Johanson, -1547 

on, -1800 
Jonasen, Johan 

Klemm, A. 
Klintberg, Chas. 
Kimtsen, Knut 
Kopnian. J. 
Koso, Pet 
Krausehat, A. 
Kristoffersen, Karl 
Kenny, G. 
Kristoffersen, O. T. 
Kugam, Fred J. 
Karlsen, -888 
Kelly, Tims. J. 
K.iarem. Sigurd 
Kleishman, Frank 
Kristlansen, Karl 



Larsen, Ludv. J. 

Larson, Ears 

I. arse n. -1290 

I. a i sen. -1S42 



I.antz, Gustaf 
Larsen, -644 
l.arsen, -1271 
Larsen, Knut C. 
1, Einar A. 
Lausmann, John 
Laws, Harry 
Leahy, -925 
Lenn, Tonny 
Lersten, J. O. 
Lewald, n. 
Liesman, Fritz 
l.iljifalk, S. 

Lindberg, John 
Lindholm, E. A 
Lindfors, Karl 
Lindkvist, 
Llndroos, Oscar 
n, Thorolf 
Magnuson, Gust. 
-sen, Axel 
Martinson, A. 
a, C. 
- r, Peter 
M 'Adam, J. 
McGuire, John 
Mackrodt, Jonny 
Madsen, C. II. 

Mads. -n. -1593 

Magnusson, E. W. 
Mancllla, Pedro 
Marcus, Bernhard 
Mathlesen, Ludv. 
Marthinlus, i ilaf 

Nelson, Charles 
X. Is. hi. Geo. 
Neumann, Aug. 
Nicolaysen, 1 1 
Ni.-lsen, Geo. 
N.lson, -641 
Nielsen, -985 
Nielsen, -909 
Nielsen, Slvert 
Nilsen, A. 

iffe, W. 
Olsen, Emil M. 
i llsen, Chas. 
Olsen, -966 
Olsen, A. H. 
i iln rg, Conrad 
Olrlchs, Harry 
i tetjen, i- - 
i ihisson. Berthel 

i iista.1. Hans 
Olsen Marinius 
Parikka, Herman 
Pearson, John S. 
I i-dersen, Louis 
F'ederson, L. R. 
Percival, Win. 
Persson, Chas. 
Petersen, -645 
Petersen, Bertel 
Pedersen, Chr. 
Pedersen, Hans 

i sen, II. 

inge, J . F. 
Rasmussen, -497 
Rice. Patrick B. 
Rigoulot, Bert 
Hints, T. 
Roalsen, Fred E. 
Kobett. John D. 
Ramsey, it. 
Reynolds, Gus 
Rici . John B. 
Ries, Willy 
Riley, J. W. 
Rignell, Brie 
San hez \ incent 
Sawberg, A. 
S.-hmidlen. -1987 
Schmidt, Fritz 
Schumacher, Wm. 
Shannon. H. C. 
Shiffer. Chas. R. 
Simpson. L. C. 
Slven, Viktor 
Sivertsen, Geo. 
Sjogren. K. A. 
Samuelsen, J. 
Sal\ esen, Thorvald 

Emil 
Schmidt, Fritz 
Schoeffler, Alfred 
Sehulz. Ernst 
Schults, Albert 

lltz, Axel 
Schwartz, Mr. 
Segerlin, Carl E. 
Scott, Ed. 
Sickler, Louis 

I. w. 
Tamm, A. 
Templeman, R. 

as, Frank 
Thomson, Hans 

• ii. Paul 



Larsen, -ill". 

Larsen, 

Larsen, -I 185 

Lerch, 

l Jndskog, T. K. 

ne, Even 
Lundberg, K. J. 
Ludvigsen, Arne 
Lundin, Fred 
Lindstrom, Anton 

ke, -1321 
Lowena, J. 
Lucas, 3. W. 
Lukman, Ewald 

i Hans ,M. 

Lundin, CI 

McKenzie, John 
McKeVzie, -1775 
McLean, John 
Meyers, Herman 
Moller, Jens 
Mortimer, Ernst 
Murphy. Howard 
Ma rhoffer, 
Marthinsen, M 
Maythum, Hans. 
Mattsson, A. M. 
Mayi 

McClure, Patrick 
Melin, Einar 
Mikkelsen, John 

ii. Gaston 

Nielsen, -884 

Nilsen, Mans 

Nilsen, -784 
Nilsson, Nat. 
Norton, Jack R. 
Neman, Gus 
Noack, ll. 
Nordi than 

Norve, <>inv, J. 

Olsen, Olal 
Olsen, Soi 

Olson. 

i ilsson, \\"m. 

. a, 

' lls.-n 

Orchard. S. IT. 
Osolin, O, 
Pettersen, Carl 

« >. 
John 
Poison, Carl 
Pratt, Pred 
Pratt, Louis 
Pedersen, -782 

Petten 

Pohlman, Hans 

Richard 

Roll. August 
R eck, i -a ni 

is, K . 
Roosi 

Rolf. Heinrich 
Rothe, Edw. 
Rorhus, k 
Rosenblad, W. 
Rose, w. H. 
Rosendorff, Chas. 

!dw. 
Ruusik, M. 
Skvskan. M. 
Smith. John A. W. 
s. .i-.isi rup, E. 
Sonora. Wm. 
Stone, Robert 
Suaminen, O. 
Sundman, Gus. 

Nik 
Swanson, Hugo 
Swensen, Carl 
Skeris. Mans 

Sorensi 

Stander, Arthur 
Stein. GuidO 

Stenberg, a if. 
Steenson, Andn 
Stachau, John 
Stiemert, ' »tto 
Strandquist, Louis 

olm, -1679 
Sundby, Emil 
Svensen, Anker 
Swanson, E. 

i'h. 
Tornkvist, M. 

Thorn. Ar 
Tjellman, Jonas 
Tofte, H. 



n, Teter 
He, Louie 

I rsia has|i,r 

Velss, -H07 

Virak, M. 

eene, J. 
\ongehr. Ewald 

Van Schoor, John 
Wahi. J. 
Winters, C. J. 
v> ahlsti , Alb. 

r, J. 

in Arthur 

Was., .It, Wm. 

•scar 
-. R. 
Zarnow, otto 



Tyson, Wm. W. 
' i 
I, Kristlan 

1'rsin. Johan 

von Vlllemayor, W. 

■ aim, Win. 

Vellinga, Louts 
Videberg, Oscar 
Vinblad, M. 

Winter, Gotthard 
Witter, Johan 
Wlllman, Fi 

Willl.la.l. U 
Wiroskv, M. 

Wold. II. 
Zebe. Gustav 



PACKAGES. 
Apply to Se< retary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

C.-1108 Heller. Olaf 
. Wm. Johansen, A. - 1 . 

Schmehl, J. P, 
■ i homson, ( 'ail 
en, A. 

Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Allen, Pred 

\n.l.i Ben, Carl - 1587 

Anderson, Albert B. 

Anderson, Martin 

-88 
i larna i 

i red 

- . F. 
Carlson, Chas. 10S7 
Cottin, Allien 
Eklund, Aug. 
Bllasen, C 

i L,-es 
. Magnus 
Johanson, K. J 
-1396 



Carl -69 
Kelly, John 
Kloot. J. 
Kolp. Otto Louis 
Kruger, Gustav 
Lowe, John \. 
Madsen. G. I-', -1677 
i .ugh, Ed. 

Molen, 1 ). V. 1 1. 
Nilson. Alt'. 

Martin 
' Us. n. Carl -908 

172 
Lundquist, Walter 

w. 
Webber, J 
Weilsen, Alfred 



Honolulu, H. T. Letter List. 

a. I-', i '. Pi 

Vndersen, A. L. Holm. J. 

Einar Janssen, 1 1. -l ."..'..", 

Clahsen, 11. Helinor, Bel In J. 

i 'ami. l.i-ll. N. i. is. J. AY. 

Portland, Or., Letter List. 



.ni, ,i. s. 
Aeckerle, E. 

riiian 
Willi. -lni 
Ufred 
r, Vincent 
Christoffersen, Olaf 

I rails 

es, T. A. 
Hansen, lians Cr. 
Ilenze, Alb. 

Holmberg, o. B. 
i Eric 

' A. 
Jonannesen, J. -in 
on, A. 

.Martin K. 

Heinrl 
'eder 



n, Adolf isak 
l.aine, A. 
l.ill.l. Minimal- 
Lewis, \V. 

Laine, Prank 

i 677 

■ K. 
i Hsiin. John 
Osvald, T. 

nk A. 

i. Erik J. 

lltZ, Axel 

■i i .- 

Saar, Hans 
Tiksman, Chas. 

-land. T. 



Eureka, Cat., Letter List. 



Anders. 

A i mini. Walter 

ni, C. 
Christensen, E H. 
i iustafson, Edward 
Gunt In-r. Theo. 

on, E. 

M. 

c. 

Mieheli. Agagtina 



Mettem.ij.-i-. J. F. 

I 
Nlccolle, Sant. 
Nilsen, Ruder 
Nyland, S 

n, Victor 
Plattner, Pred 
inske, R. 
list. 
Skutul, A. 
Simp - C. 

Svensen, t i 
Telgland, G 
Thortensen, Peter 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 

a- Karvonen, Lars 
Asker, S. J. Le Fort, Guervis 

Hoffman, Tom Moberg, Alf. 

Henriksson, G. II. Williams, Chas. 
Jensen. Ingwald M. Wilson, Herman 




SET YOUR COURSE 

FOR THE 

Store that Sells 



POSS^BOAD 

-UNION HUE 
OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

SAN FRANCISCO . NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



DEMAND THE BRAND 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. . 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,453,983.62 

Deposits, June 30, 1908 34,474,554.23 

Total Assets 37,055,263.31 

Remittances may be made by Draft, 
Post Office, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 
o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 7 
o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. for receipt 
of deposits only. 

Officers. 

President, N. Olilandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
fen. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Ili-men, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 

THE HARRISON 

Newly furnished rooms. 

456 HARRISON ST., Corner First, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Hot and cold running water in 
every room; electric lighted and free 
baths. Terms $1.50 per week up. 

Hotel Santa Fe 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 

Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Kates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bell, and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 

HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



Badges, Banners, Regalia, Robes, 

Lapel Buttons 

Briefs, Constitutions and By-Laws, 

and Souvenirs, at 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 

391 Jessie St., San Francisco. 

Phone Kearny 1966 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. f. 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 



EXPRESSING 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 East St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 109 Steuart St. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 

CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



SOMETHING NEW 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE NICOTINE DESTROYER 

"ANTIDOTE," the Catalytic Pipe has Four 
Important Advantages which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

, 1. The "ANTIDOTE" needs No Break- 
ing in. Every smoker knows the terrors 
of the first few smokes in an ordinary 
I'ipe ; The First Smoke in an "ANTI- 
DOTE" is as sweet as an ordinary 
Pipe sweetened by Long Usage. 

2. The "ANTIDOTE" can not 
burn out. The Catalytic lining pro- 
tects the briar. 

3. The "ANTIDOTE" is always 
Dry even with constant smoking 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scien 
tifically destroys the Nicotine, 
making it evaporate. A por- 
ous lining filled with Coal Tar 
Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 




placed in 
the bowl 
of a briar 
pipe, this is 
called the 
Catalyser; the 
smoke passing 
over the C a t a. 
lyser produces 
Formol. This For- 
mol turns all the 
moisture and Nico- 
tine into steam, caus- 
ing jt to pass off into 
the air and evaporate. 
All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes 
are hand made, of the 
Jest French Briar. 

KASSER BROS. 

Distributors 
19 MARKET STREET 
S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 
Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 



Buy Your 

Clothing, Hats 
and Shoes 

From 

C. I. SWANSON 

Oilskins, Rubberboots, Suit- 
cases, Trunks, Valises, 
Bedding, Pillows and 
Blankets 

STYLISH GOODS 
LOW PRICES 

Suits Cleaned and Pressed 

119 EAST ST. 

Between Washington and 
Merchant Streets 

San Francisco 
Suits Made to Order. 




BUY 

FLATIRON 
PANTS 

SATISFACTION 
GUARANTEED 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Wilhelm Schumacher, a native of 
Duisburg-Ruhrort, Germany, is in 
quired for by the German Consul, 51 
Third street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific is 
inquired for by his father. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

5 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION BATS 



News from Abroad. 



A decree announcing the union of 
Crete with Greece was published at 
Cananea, Crete, on October 7. 

The United States battleship fleet 
safely rode a hurricane in the harbor 
of Manila, P. I., on October 4. 

Bulgaria declared her independence 
of Turkey on October 5, and Prince 
Ferdinand proclaimed himself Czar. 

The Japanese Government has de- 
cided to absolutely prohibit all gam- 
bling on race tracks and to strictly 
enforce the laws governing racing. 

It is believed that the danger of 
war in Europe has been greatly less- 
ened, due to the attitude of Turkey 
in refraining from aggressive meas- 
ures. 

Ten thousand dollars and a gold 
cup worth $250 now awaits the first 
aviator who successfully crosses the 
English Channel in an airship of any 
kind heavier than air. 

It is expected that Japan will re- 
duce its large force of troops in 
northern China to two companies. 
By making this reduction Japan will 
be able to make a saving of $75,000 
a year. 

In accordance with recommenda- 
tions passed by the Russian Douma, 
Emperor Nicholas has appointed a 
commission to study the railroad 
service of Russia and remedy the cry- 
111.', evils thereof. 

Admiral Nebogatoff, who com- 
manded a squadron of Admiral Ro- 
jestvensky's fleet when it was de- 
feated by the Japanese under Admiral 
Togo, is writing a naval history of 
the Russo-Japanese war. 

A proclamation by Emperor Fran- 
cis Joseph of Austria-Hungary was 
issued on October 7, declaring that 
the Austro-Hungarian rights of sov- 
ereignty and succession have been ex- 
tended over Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

It is learned that the real reason 
of Sir Robert Hart's visit to England 
was to bring about an alliance be- 
tween China, the United States and 
Great Britain to conserve the inter- 
ests of the three nations in the Far 

East. 

The French submarine Emcraude 
arrived at Cherbourg, on October 6, 
after a run of eighty-one hours in 
which she covered a distance of 693 
miles under water. The vessel main- 
tained a regular speed of nine knots 
an hour. 

As a result of the decrease in the 
lad- of postage between the British 
Isles and the United States the steam 
ship Lusitania, which sailed from 
Liverpool, Eng., on October 3. for 
New York, carried a greatly increased 
quantity of mail. 

The Austria Hungarian Minister of 
War has ordered four army corps, 
those at Hermanonstadt, Temesvar, 
Szegedin and Agram, respectively, to 
prepare for mobilization. This move 
is considered purely precautionary 

and not aggresivc. 

The Mexican Government proposes 
to create a Federal district Opposite 
El Paso, Texas, with the city of Juarez 
as the capital, to be governed in the 
same manner as the Federal district 
of Mexico City. The object is to sup- 
press revolutionists and smugglers. 

Upwards of 7000 bodies have already 
been extricated by the health depart- 
ment of Hyderabad, East India, and 
the belief prevails that the total death 
roll resulting from the floods that de 
vastated the Hyderabad and I )■ 
districts recently will exceed all 
previous estimates. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



The Pace. — "How fasl is your steam 
yacht?" 

'About a c an 

In iur." — Life. 



She Knew. — At the clo 

of a Syracuse si l 1 a little girl was 

asked: "Win is the head of our : 
eminent?" "Mr. Roosevelt," she re- 
plied, pn imptly. "That is right,' 
the teacher, "but his official 

title?" "Teddy!" •■ I the little 

miss, promptly. — V\ 



Mrs 

is 



Chug- 
a 'car 



More Information.- 
water "Josiah, 
famine'?" 

Mr. Chugwater — "Remember the 

dinner we got in thai dining ear 

we went to ( >hio last month? Well, 
that was one." — Chi I bune. 



Real Hero.— Phi Why did 

you have such an Ugly '• ur as 

that stuffed?" 

Binks (with emotion)— "That 
saved my life." 

tboj -"Well, well! How?" 

Binks— "When we got hack from 
unr wedding tour my wife bal 
cake for me and the dog ate it." — 
Exchange. 



Golf in the Sun. — "Hoot, muni" 
shouted the big Scotchman, as he 
pounded the ball From the tee, 
bliss." 

And the lovely American girl 
had been playing in the blazing sun 
for two hours replied feebly: 

"That may he. but to me it 
like a game of blister." — Chi 
News. 



No Grammarian.— Weary Willie — 
"Lady, kin youse give a poor feller a 
bite t' eat?" 

Mrs. Rurallum— "Why, certainly. 

Did you see a pile of w 1 as you 

came in?" 

Weary Willie— "Yes'm, I seen it." 

Mrs. Rurallum — "You mean that 
you saw it." 

Weary Willie (beating it while his 

slides were good) "'Sens.- me. lady. 
but T ain't no grammarian." — New 
York Globe. 



HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

The burglar who robbed a Humboldt 
man did not get much. 

Humboldt men keep their valuables 
in our big new Armor Plate Vault, 
where they are exempt from the and 
theft. Rental terms reasonable. AVe 
invite your Inspection. 

Open Saturday Evenings from 6 to 8 
o'clock to receive deposits. 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Affiliated with 

THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 

Authorized Capital (Combined) SSOO.OOO.OO 

Capital and Surplus 3S5, 000.00 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
CI IAS. NELSON, President 

LEWIS I. COWGILL, Vice-President 
L. W. MacDONALD, Cashier 
J. C. ESCI1EN 

4% interest paid on Savings Deposits. 
Money transmitted to all parts of the world at lowest rates. 



HENRY WILSON 
ALBERT SUTTON 

C. S. WRIGHT 
W. II. LITTLE 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 

T 1 1 B 

United States Nautical College. . 



CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD 



Principal 



The oldest navigation school on the 
Pacific Coast (establis offers you 

a/ivantages that can not be obtained else- 
where. 

Our methods are short, thorough, con- 
il; the prices are mo 
md you are assured of a "square 
deal." 

HOTEL MOHAWK 

EAST STREET - - San Francisco 

Good accommodation for students. 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

INo. A MISSION ST., neat- Hast, SAIV FRANCISCO 



J. COHEN & CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



Hand Tailored 
Union Made 

Suits \ $12.50 
Overcoats > to 
Raincoats j $25.00 

Wallenstein & Frost 



824 Market St. 

Opposite 4th St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



J0HNJ.BAGLEY&C0. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturers 

PIPE TOBACCOS 

Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 




Ss s ! Most Reliable Jewelry House RS 
SOREINSEIN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

RELIABLE JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

SPECTACLES FITTED, EYES EXAMINED FREE 

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Branch Store, 2593 Mission St., near Twenty-second. 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for 2 Yean 



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We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



The Most Thorough and the Best Equipped Nautical School in San Francisco 

VON SCHOEN'S 

Navigation School 



SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE 



242 Steuart St., near Folsom 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

212-214 

LEAVENWORTH 
STREET, S. F. 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Francisco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits 
a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
ncit make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



9P —<> Issotd CijniAijtinnto ol tha -^- o| 

iJIMACO, WORKERS .^gSfe^ INTERNOTDNM. 
UNION. 




uiviorv 



MADE 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 1888 

510 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Largest and best equipped private Nautical School on the Continent of 
America. 

Henry Taylor (Attorney and Counsellor at Law), Lecturer in Naviga- 
tion and Maritime Law. 

WILLIAM B. PAGE, Class Instructor. 



CHRISTENSEN'S 

School of 

NAVIGATION 

NO FAILURES 
Room 23, 82 Market St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXII, No. 5. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 1 , 1 908. 


Whole No. 1087. 



BE CANDID, GENTLEMEN! 



DRIVEN to desperation by their failure to 
deceive and cajole the toilers on the indus- 
trial issues of this campaign, Mr. Taft and 
his supporters charge that the workers are en- 
deavoring to secure "special legislation," which 
will enable them to become, "a privileged class of 
wrongdoers." Nothing further from the truth has 
ever been uttered and the Republican politicians 
know it. They are trying to deceive the people. 
The plain fact is that the workers have already 
been most unjustly discriminated against by Con- 
gress and the courts. The toilers have already 
been shorn of more rights than any other class of 
people. The workers' present campaign is for an 
Executive and a Congress which will see to it 
that their constitutional rights — gravely imperiled 
— shall be restored and safeguarded. 

The issues involved in this campaign are the 
most serious that have ever confronted the Ameri- 
can people— not excepting that of chattel slavery 
— for unless Labor shall soon secure relief from 
the recent Supreme Court decision holding that 
unions are trusts and conspiracies under the Sher- 
man Anti-Trust law (Danbury Hatters' case), and 
unless the abuse of the injunction power by the 
courts shall soon be checked by Congress, then, 
indeed, will the toilers become industrial serfs, 
deprived of the privileges of free speech, free 
press and peaceable assemblage — aye, even of the 
right to make peaceful wage agreements with em- 
ployers, for these have even been held by the 
Supreme Court to be the evidence of conspiracy. 
Mr. Taft in his speeches never alludes to this 
Supreme Court decision which holds labor unions 
as trusts, conspiracies, or combinatioiis in illegal 
restraint of trade. He evidently hopes that the 
masses will remain in ignorance of the evils which 
threaten them when that decision is enforced. 
Indeed, the Hatters of Danbury, Conn., are now 
being sued for $240,000— triple damages— under 
that decision and the trial is in progress at this 
time. 

When Mr. Taft or his supporters refer to the 
injunction, abuse, it is only to uphold the current 
perversion of fundamental principle which allows 
the courts to abuse the original intent of in- 
junctions by applying them wrongfully in labor 
cases, when they would not apply to any other 
citizen in the entire country. Mr. Taft always 
defends his course as an injunction judge and 
declares that he has aided labor, not assailed its 
rights. Again he counts upon popular ignorance 
of the real issues involved. 

We must not for one moment forget that every 
utterance of Mr. Taft and his supporters upholds 
the unjust treatment by the courts and Congress 
under which labor is already suffering and under 
which it will suffer more grievously as time goes 
on unless relieved by Congressional Act. There 
is no admission of error, no promise of reform on 
the part of Mr. Taft or his supporters. 

Mr. Van Cleave in his official organ, "American 
Industries," in quoting Mr. Taft's speech of ac- 
ceptance, heads it: "Taft Upholds Injunctions.' 

When we ask our fellow-workers to choose be- 
tween the two great political parties, we ask them 
to remember that Mr. Taft and his party offer 
us no relief, yet they expect to be elected by the 
very workers who already suffer so keenly from 
the deprivation of their constitutional rights. 
Mr. Bryan, on the other hand, in addition to 



heartily and sympathetically indorsing the plat- 
form of his party in regard to the labor planks, 
also discusses most frankly and courageously the 
issues involved and points out that the Demo- 
cratic party proposes to remedy the wrongs under 
which labor suffers. Take, as an illustration, the 
following from his speech on Labor Day: 

"The labor organization has been seriously 
handicapped by the fact that it has been— and I 
am not sure that it has been done unwittingly — 
yoked up with the industrial combinations known 
as trusts. The proneness of trust defenders to 
use the labor organization as an excuse for com- 
binations in restraint of trade has aroused the sus- 
picion that they have been classed together for 
the purpose of shielding the combinations of capi- 
tal. 

"As the result of eighteen years of anti-trust 
legislation, only one man has been given a penal 
sentence for violating the Federal law on this 
subject, and that man was a member of a labor 
organization rather than a trust magnate. The 
laboring man is justified in his demand that a dis- 
tinction shall be drawn between the labor organi- 
zation and the industrial monopoly. 

"The trust and the labor organization can not 
be described in the same language. The trust 
magnates have used their power to amass swollen 
fortunes, while no one will say that the labor 
organization has as yet secured for its members 
their share of the profits arising from their work. 
But there are fundamental differences. 

"THE TRUST IS A COMBINATION OF 
DOLLARS; THE LABOR ORGANIZATION 
IS AN ASSOCIATION OF HUMAN BEINGS. 

"In a trust a few men attempt to control the 
product of others; in a labor organization the 
members unite for the protection of that which is 
their own, namely, their own labor, which, being 
necessary to their existence, is a part of them. 

"The trust deals with dead matter; the labor 
organization deals with life and with intellectual 
and moral forces. 

"No impartial student of the subject will deny 
the right of the laboring man to exemption from 
the operation of the existing anti-trust law. 

"The Republican convention did not deal can- 
didly with the laboring men on the subject of the 
writ of injunction. Secretary Taft has endeavored 
to amend his platform in this respect and to make 
some promises, which are not supported by his 
platform, but his promises offer nothing substan- 
tial in the way of reform, and arc not binding 
on Republican senators and members. The Re- 
publican Congress has already made a record on 
labor questions, and the Republican party can not 
escape from that record. 

"The Republican platform, while pretending to 
pledge some modification of the law contains an 
exception clause which indorses the existing prac- 
tice. 

"The platform was a triumph for those who 
have been opposing the laboring man, and they 
have been boasting of their victory. 

"The Democratic platform on this subject copies 
the language which the labor organizations sub- 
mitted t<> the Republican and Democratic conven- 
tions. Mr. Taft, in his acceptance speech, objects 
to the language. He charges that the Democratic 
anti-injunction plank was 'loosely drawn' and 
framed for 'the especial purpose of rendering it 



susceptible to one interpretation by one set of 
men, and a diametrically opposite interpretation 
by another.' As Mr. Taft has had long experience 
on the bench, and is therefore skilled in the inter- 
pretation of language, I ask him to give us, if he 
can, two opposite interpretations of this language. 
The plank demands that 'all parties to all judicial 
proceedings shall be treated with rigid impartial- 
ity.' Surely he can not find two interpretations to 
the phrase 'rigid impartiality.' 

"Speaking of industrial disputes, our platform 
declares that 'INJUNCTIONS SHALL NOT BE 
ISSUED IN ANY CASES IN WHICH IN- 
JUNCTIONS WOULD NOT ISSUE IF NO IN- 
DUSTRIAL DISPUTE WERE INVOLVED.' 
How can that language be misconstrued or mis- 
interpreted? If words mean anything that plank 
means that an industrial dispute shall not, in it- 
self, be regarded as a sufficient cause for an in- 
junction. If an injunction issues in an industrial 
dispute it must be based upon acts which would 
justify an injunction if there were no industrial 
dispute involved. 

"There is nothing ambiguous about it; there is 
nothing that can be misconstrued or misinterpret- 
ed, even by one desiring to find a double meaning. 
Why do the Republican leaders attempt to read 
ambiguity into those words? Simply because they 
can not meet the proposition presented. Even 
Mr. Taft attempts to avoid the issue by saying 
that 'no one has ever maintained that the fact 
that a dispute was industrial gave any basis for 
the issuing of an injunction in reference thereto.' 
If it is true that no one now maintains that, then 
why find fault with our platform on that subject? 
We ought to have no difficulty in securing the 
passage of a law in harmony with this plank." 

Mr. Bryan then took up the question of jury 
trial in contempt cases, criticizing Mr. Taft's con- 
tention that such trials would hinder the court's 
enforcement of its orders, saying: "This would 
come under the head of 'important, if true.'" Mr. 
Bryan, in further discussing the Democratic plat- 
form on the injunction issue, said that an act 
"providing for trial by jury in cases of indirect 
contempt would have passed Congress and be- 
come a law long ago but for the fact that a few 
large corporate employers of labor have kept a 
lobby in Washington ever since, and have been 
able to coerce Congress into ignoring the laboring 
men's plea." 

"Mr. Taft is not an unbiased judge where the 
jury system is under consideration. lie is not 
only known as the Father of Government by in- 
junction, but he is prejudiced against the jury 
system. Every man is unconsciously influenced 
by his environment, and Mr. Taft's long service 
upon the bench has led him to underrate the 
importance of the jury system. In his address to 
the students of Yale, entitled 'A Judge on the 
Bench,' he shows a decided leaning toward an 
increase of the authority of the judgi and praises 
the procedure in the Federal court at the expense 
of the other courts. 

"He (Taft) has fallen into the error of assum- 
ing that any improvement in the method of court 
procedure is an attack upon the authority of the 
court. This is an ancient method of opposing re- 
forms. 

"It is not a reflection upon the judge of a 
criminal court to say that he shall not decide upon 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 






uilt of the accused. Our criminal courts 
are the better, not the worse, for the substitution 
of trial by jury. 
"It must be remembered, too, that in i 

of contempt, the charge is a criminal one and 
that the punishment is by fine or imprisonment. 
All the reasons that apply to criminal cases apply 
ontempt, and the ABUSES TO 
BE REMOVED BY THE PROPOSED LAW 
ARE THOSE THAT HAVE GROWN UP BE- 
CAUSE OF THE INCREASED TENDENCY 
OF THE GREAT CORPORATIONS TO USE 
THE WRIT OF 1N| UNCTION TO AVOID 
THE JURY TRIAL." 

\\ bile the laboring men have been the first 
to complain of this denial of the right of trial 
by jury in contempt, it ought not to be 

dered wholly a labor <|m:sti,,n. The jury 
system is so essential to the administration of 
justice that the subject ought to appeal to all who 
make a study of tin: science of government. The 
jury system must be preserved, and we can not 
hope to preserve it if, for any reason or under 
any pretext, we permit any citizen to be denied 
the protection which it furnishes." 

To return for a moment to Mr. Taft's charge 
that the workers desire to become a "privileged 
of wrongdoers" through special class legisla- 
tion, let us remind the public that there is most 
emphatically a "privileged class of wrongdoers" 
in this country. This class is composed of big 
trusts and combinations. They have secured all 
sorts of special privileges, franchises, and exemp- 
tion through class legislation. More than that, 
they have managed to defeat legislation which 
would regulate their activities within normal 
limits and keep them from preying on the people 
at large. 

The recent newspaper exposure of Senator 
Foraker shows that he was "retained" by a great 
trust and accepted many thousands of dollars 
since he has been in the Senate for obstructing 
and defeating any legislation which might be 
offered to curb the illegal practices of the trusts. 
One of the published letters — of which Senator 
Foraker admits the accuracy — calls his attention 
to the desirability of defeating a measure regu- 
lating trusts, which Senator Jones had introduced. 
That Senator Foraker did his work well for his 
trust employers is shown by the fact that the 
bill never emerged from committee. Senator 
Foraker admits that he was retained by the Stand- 
ard Oil Trust while pretending at the same time 
to serve the people as United States Senator. His 
defense is that it was not considered wrong to 
accept such service. 

The thing to which we especially call attention 
in this Foraker matter is. that it is evident to 
anybody possessed of average discernment that 
Mr. Foraker may not be the only Senator who 
accepts trust "retainers." If he were, it would 
hardly be possible for him to "deliver the goods" 
so successfully year after year. It takes quite a 
number of Senators to defeat the will of the 
people, yet they have generally done it success- 
fully. We also point out the curious coincidence 
that, while the corporations have had little diffi- 
culty in securing immunity from restrictive legis- 
lation, the workers have been unable to secure 
anything in the way of just and protective legis- 
lation which would guard and defend the funda- 
mental rights of human liberty, primarily for 
themselves and generally for all the people. 

Unlike the great corporations, the toilers ask 
no immunity before the law. They ask for no 
special privileges. They are law-abiding, patri- 
otic, and self-respecting citizens. They ask only 
that they be protected in the enjoyment of their 
natural and constitutional rights — that they shall 
nol be made the target of special court proceed- 
ings and decisions, which are never applied to 
any other class of people. 

Aye, even in the matter of injunction, Labor 
asks no exemption from its rightful application 
or from any other equal interpretation of existing 
law. 

Labor only asks that if any workman be guilty 
of a violation of law, he be brought before the 
court, confronted by his accuser, and tried by a 
jury of his peers as any other person might be. 

We insist that the toiler be granted equal rights 
before the law regardless of his position in 
society. 

The campaign utterances of Taft, Cannon, and 
even President Roosevelt all tend to delude the 
public into the belief that this is already the 
practice and the law, and that the workers have 
nothing of which to complain. 

I 'resident Roosevelt, in a recent letter to Con- 
rad Kohrs, a cattleman of Montana, says: 

"If there is one body of men more than an- 
other whose support I feel I have a right to 
challenge on behalf of Secretary Taft, it is the 
body of wage workers of the country. 

"Mr, Taft has been attacked because of the in- 
junctions he delivered while on the bench. I am 
content to rest his case on these very injunctions. 

"lie has incurred the bitter hostility of foolish 
and bigoted reactionaries by his frank criticism 
of the abuse of the power of injunction in labor 
disputes, and he is pledged to do all he can to 
put a stop to the abuses in the exercise of the 
power of injunction. 

"As for the attack upon his injunctions in labor 
disputes, made while he was on the bench, I ask 
that the injunctions he carefully examined. 

responsible organization would now hesi- 
tate to condemn the abuses against which Judge 
Taft's injunctions were aimed." 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



ENGLAND IN 1950. 



The annual reports of the Registrar-Gen- 
eral of Births, Deaths and Marriages may 
not at first sight appear very promising 
material to the newspaper reader. But he 
makes a great mistake if he overlooks their 
importance or the value of the deductions 
that can be drawn from their masses of fig- 
ures. From them we are able dimly to 
forecast the future, and to see, as in a glass 
darkly, what will be the social condition of 
this country in the next generation. When, 
year after year, their statistics reveal the 
same movement, there can be but little 
doubt of the tendencies at work or of the 
forces shaping the destiny of Britain. 

The first fact that appears is that the 
England of 1950 will have a stationary pop- 
ulation. Unless there is an earthquake 
change the birth rate will continue to fall, 
and by all appearances with increasing ve- 
locity. It has been declining steadily ever 
since 1876, when it reached the high- 
water mark of 36.4 per 1000 of the popula- 
tion, to which it gradually moved up from 
the period sometimes called the "Hungry 
Forties." The figure for England and Wales 
last year was only 26.3 births per 1000, so 
that in thirty-one years the loss has been 
10.1 per 1000. Moreover, the fall last year 
was the heaviest ever recorded in any single 
year. We have, then, to face the prospect 
of an England which will resemble France 
in that the population will stand still or 
only advance through immigration. Hither- 
to some part of the loss of the birth rate 
has been made good by a decrease in the 
death rate, in which the fall between 1876 
and 1907 has been from 20.9 to 15 deaths 
per 1000. But this is a process which 
clearly can not continue indefinitely. A 
second fact which appears from this con- 
current decline of the birth and death rates 
is that the England of 1950 will be a country 
with far more aged persons and with far 
fewer young people. There will probably 
be a falling off in the general health and 
vigor of the community, and, perhaps, a loss 
of that ardent idealism which attaches to 
youth and which is the most splendid virtue 
of those who have not passed through the 
bitter waters of disillusionment. 

Yet another feature of this society, which 
many of us will live to see, will be the 
smallness of its families. The large family 
will have died out except among the aliens. 
It is in the alien districts of London that 
the largest families are to be found at the 
present moment. The law that the inferior 
stock multiplies and kills the superior will 
be seen at work more vigorously than ever. 
This is one explanation of the declining 
birth rate among the working class to-day, 
for British working-class parents of good 
antecedents, in the words which the Ameri- 
can economist, General Francis Walker. 
used of the native stock of the United 
States, have "become increasingly unwilling 
to bring forth sons and daughters who will 
be compelled to compete in the market for 
labor and in the walks of life with those 
whom they do not recognize as of their own 
grade and condition." They will not send 
forth their offspring to fight with a lower 
standard and to risk sinking to the condi- 
tions of that lower standard. And thus, 
gradually, inch by inch, the lower standard 
of living will encroach upon the higher, un- 
it be checked by legislative means. 



Even then the battle is often only trans- 
ferred t<> another field, for the struggle be- 
tween the Standards is world-wide, tierce 
and persistent.— London Daily Mail. 



SAN FRANCISCO HARBOR. 



The papers of Northern and Central Cali- 
fornia have been reflecting the interest felt 
by the public in the visit of the fleet to 
San Francisco for some time, and the en- 
thusiasm of yesterday fulfills expectations. 
But if the Navy brought a new glory to the 
harbor the pageant would have been far 
less effective without such a magnificent 
bay, and even while the war vessels are 
anchored there it is pleasant to reflect upon 
the commercial possibilities the harbor sug- 
gests. 

Ordinarily the shipping is not impressive, 
though there is room to float a splendid 
merchant marine and depth of water many 
miles inward for seagoing boats. Few 
1'iit-, in fact, in any part of the world have 
such great natural advantages, and the 
beauty of the prospect from the Berkeley 
hills can never be forgotten. 

The beauty, of course, does not count in 
business, but the harbor should, and yet in 
a long list of seaports San Francisco ranks 
far down toward the foot. It is about on a 
par with Sydney, and clearly exceeds 
Melbourne alone. French, German, Span- 
ish, British and Oriental cities all rank- 
higher. So do Havana and Vera Cruz, 
Buenos Ayres and Rio Janeiro. In our 
own country San Francisco is surpassed by 
Baltimore, Boston, Galveston, New Orleans, 
New York and Philadelphia. 

About the future, however, there can be 
no doubt. This is the port of a State which 
is capable of developing an imperial trade 
by itself. It is the western terminus of 
great transcontinental railroad lines, whose 
interests must ever be closely identified 
with the city. Its almost unrivaled harbor 
is the starting place for the Orient, the base 
of a Pacific trade that must increase very 
rapidly from now on. 

People who have been somewhat doubt- 
ful concerning San Francisco's recovery 
from the fire have not fully realized what 
all this advantage of position means. How- 
ever much the city's rivals may have bene- 
fited by its misfortunes it is still the metrop- 
olis of the Coast, and it is not in the slight- 
est danger of losing its supremacy for many 
years to come. The new San Francisco 
will entirely outclass the old. — Chicago 
Record Herald. 



PENSIONS FOR WIDOWS. 



In stating that the Australian State of 
Queensland in 1879 began a system of sub- 
sidizing widows in the care of their children. 
Consular Agent Ashbury Caldwell, of Bris- 
bane, writes of its further development : 

The idea has steadily grown, and it has 
been found wiser for the State to pension 
the mother for the care of her children than 
to condemn her to such employment which 
would cause her to neglect the children. 
The following new scale of weekly allow- 
ances was authorized by the recent Parlia- 
ment to take effect May 1, 1908: For one 
child, $1.22; two children, $1.10 each; three 
children, 97 cents each; four children, 91 
cents each ; more than four children, a max- 
imum of $4.38. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

( Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions. ) 




*^<^* 













RECORD LONG PASSAGES. 



When the three-masted schooner Sadie C. 
Sumner arrived at Boston, Mass., recently 
from Baltimore, after being exactly a month 
on the way, it was thought that her record 
for making speed backward would stand 
for a while. But when the Emma F. An- 
gell, also a three-master, was towed in later, 
Captain McLean and his crew of the Sum- 
ner cheerfully stood aside and handed over 
the palms to the new-comer. For the Angell 
not only was thirty days on the passage up 
from the Chesapeake, but she went the Sum- 
ner some better. To be exact, she was forty- 
six days from Newport News, which is go- 
ing some, or rather not going at all. 

Still, the sailing qualities of the craft after 
all had nothing to do with the case, for it 
was the weather, which was very bad in- 
deed. Three or four times she got out by 
Cape Henry and started north, and as often 
she was driven back. When she did get 
away from Hampton Roads she struck 
heavy weather again and more of it, so she 
scurried into the shelter of Delaware Break- 
water, and again she put into New York 
Bay. She had to take on new supplies and 
provisions several times during the passage. 
The men felt like throwing their hats in the 
air when they finally did get to Boston. For 
some of them fully expected to still be off 
the coast somewhere when the folks at home 
were eating their Thanksgiving dinner. 



ARRIVALS AT BOSTON. 



BANANAS FOR FISHES. 



Over 7000 bunches of bananas were 
dumped into Massachusetts Bay recently 
from the Norwegian fruit steamer Verona. 
They were not good bananas. They were 
very bad ones. The Verona was caught in 
the hurricane on her trip up from Jamaica. 
She was delayed three days in arriving, 
which was fatal to the fruit. The 7000 
bunches comprised over one-third of the ves- 
sel's entire cargo. 

On board the Verona when she left Long 
Wharf were a big gang of fruit handlers. 
The steamer proceeded far out into the Bay 
and for several hours all hands were oc- 
cupied in throwing the bananas into the sea. 
Late in the afternoon the fruiter came back 
into the upper harbor and berthed at Cen- 
tral Wharf. After her engines have been 
given a looking over she will get away for 
Jamaica to load another fruit cargo. Cap- 
tain Oxholm hopes he will have better luck. 



FIVE-MASTER BREAKS RECORDS. 



Shortly after the Emma F. Angell ar- 
rived at Boston, Mass., recently, on her 
forty-sixth day out from Baltimore, word 
was received that the five-master Henry O. 
Barrett had made the trip from Boston to 
Brunswick, Ga., a far longer run, in four 
days and twelve hours. This is the fastest 
time ever made and is only about twenty- 
four hours longer than it would take a 
steamer. 



The Houston line steamship Horatius 
reached her berth at National dock, East 
Boston, from River Plate ports recently. 
During the morning the wind off Highland 
Light was tearing over the water at 50 
knots an hour. In the afternoon, however, 
it moderated to 25 miles an hour, the wind 
working more northerly. The Lake steam- 
er Kenosha, from Philadelphia for Boston, 
attempted to round the pitch of the Cape, 
but was forced back to an anchorage under 
the lee of Chatham. The Metropolitan line 
steamer Yale made her berth nearly an hour 
late, and all arriving liners were held back 
more or less by the gale. 

Both imports and exports for the week 
ending October 8 show a marked decrease, 
especially the latter, in comparison to 
figures for the same period of last year. 

The four-masted schooner James Pierce, 
Captain Vail, left port for Norfolk, where 
she will load a full cargo of coal for deliv- 
ery at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 

One of the early morning arrivals recently 
was the steamer Limon, Captain Smith, 
which reached Long wharf before 8 o'clock, 
after running through a heavy northeasterly 
sea for more than 200 miles. Despite the 
rough going she made a fast trip, covering 
the distance from Port Limon in a trifle 
more than seven days. 

One of the largest cargoes brought from 
the South this year was stowed in the holds 
of the ocean liner City of Memphis, Captain 
Dreyer, which was in early yesterday morn- 
ing from Savannah. In addition to 8295 
bales of cotton the steamer had 178 pack- 
ages of fruits and 135 tons of pig iron. 



NEW USE FOR WIRELESS. 



ST. MARY'S TO BE BURNED. 



The Russian Volunteer Fleet has asked 
for a subsidy for eleven years on a pro- 
posed line from Vladivostok to Kamchatka 



The schoolship St. Mary, for thirty-three 
years used as a nautical school by New 
York State, is now anchored at the old Gas 
House wharf at the North End, Boston, 
awaiting dismantling by her owners and 
final destruction by fire. She was con- 
demned by the Government some three 
years ago as unseaworthy and then suc- 
ceeded by the gunboat Newark. 

The St. Mary was recently sold to the 
Thomas Butler Company, of Boston, at 
New York, after an unsuccessful attempt 
was made to raise funds for her purchase 
by some seamen and others on account of 
old associations. 

The old schoolship left the Brooklyn 
Navy Yard recently. After coming through 
Long Island Sound she proceeded up Bos- 
ton Harbor and was towed into her present 
resting place by the tug Orion. 

She will be towed to the waters of the 
Point of Pines and burned in order that 
the owners may recover the copper and 
other metal which is contained in the hull. 



Over seas as smooth as if they had not 
been lashed to fury only a few days 
previously, the United Fruit steamer Limon 
arrived at Boston recently from Central 
America, with a load of bananas and two 
passengers. Captain Smith was the first 
skipper in many days to have a good word 
to say for the weather. 



A new use for wireless telegraph aboard 
a steamer is to send word to another boat 
ahead to get out of the way. This remark- 
able message was flashed from the new 
steamer Commonwealth to the turbine Har- 
vard while both were coming out of New 
York harbor recently, the Harvard bound 
to Boston and the Commonwealth for Fall 
River. And when Captain Crowell on the 
Metropolitan flier got the message he nearly 
collapsed. He did get out of the Common- 
wealth's way, but by showing her her heels. 

The two big speedy passenger boats left 
the East River almost at the same time and 
as they were about on even terms at Exe- 
cution Rock, just outside Hell Gate, Cap- 
tain Crowell thought he might as well set- 
tle the rivalry between the officers and crews 
as to which vessel was the faster. While 
the hundreds of passengers were lining the 
rails of both fliers, the wireless from the 
Commonwealth was received in the tele- 
graph room. Captain Crowell responded by 
sending the full speed ahead signal down to 
the engine-room. The passengers realized 
at once that there was something doing, for 
the Commonwealth, too, hit up a fast clip. 
But Captain Crowell said that in three- 
quarters of an hour the Commonwealth was 
some distance astern and nothing but her 
lights could be made out. The Harvard 
kept churning up the waters of the Sound 
to the tune of twenty-one knots. She 
reached her dock at India wharf precisely 
on the stroke of 8. 



DANGEROUS WRECKAGE. 



After running through a heavy sea for 
2000 miles, the United Fruit steamer Limon 
arrived at Boston recently from Costa Rica. 
Though the vessel was handicapped by the 
weather during nearly the entire voyage, 
she made one of her fastest trips, making 
the distance in about a week. Captain Smith 
reported that on the previous Thursday, 
when fifty miles north of Jupiter light, he 
sighted a section of a vessel's bulwarks 
about fifty feet long, which was probably 
part of the ill-fated schooner Sirroco, six 
of whose crew were rescued and brought 
to Boston by the British steamship Hora- 
tius. The wreckage was drifting directly in 
the track of shipping and was a dangerous 
obstruction. 



BODINE APPOINTED ORGANIZER. 



It is now Organizer George Bodinc, of 
the American Federation of Labor. Mr. 
Bodine has been commissioned by the 
American Federation of Labor to act as Mr. 
Leonard's deputy. "The appointment of 
the new organizer will not conflict with the 
work of Deputy Organizer Julius Schroth," 
says Mr. Leonard. "In all large cities there 
are several organizers, and for that reason 
I have asked the Federation of Labor to ap- 
point Mr. Bodine." 

Mr. Bodine is Mobile (Ala.) agent for 
the International Seamen's Union, besides 
being an international officer of the Sea- 
men's organization. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



The number of British paupers re- 
lieved on one day in August in thirty- 
live selected urban districts corre- 
sponded to a rate of 215 per 10,000 of 
the estimated population. 

M. Gerasimoc, a Socialist member 
of the first Russian Douma, was ar- 
rested at St. Petersburg on October 
8, charged with endeavoring to or- 
ganize a strike by tbe employes of 
the city street-car lin 

The net result of all the changes 
in British wages taking effect in 
August was a decrease of £3,140 per 
week, as compared with a decrease of 
£17,144 per week in July, and an in- 
crease of £24,819 per week ill August, 
1907. 

Exclusive of seamen, the number of 
British workpeople reported as killed 
in the course of their employment 
during August was 274, an increase of 
73 as compared with the previous 
month, and of 28 as compared witli 
August, 1907. 

The Japanese Government has 
raised the wages of artisans, engi- 
neers and shipwrights employed in the 
Government dockyards to Is. 3d. per 
day, which is the highest wage that 
has ever been paid to skilled work- 
men in that country. 

The problem of dealing with the 
unemployed in the great centres of 
population in Great Britain is being 
considered by Government authori- 
ties, all of whom agree that the num- 
ber of persons out of work will be 
greater this winter than in many 
years. 

Compositors, linotype operators and 
other printing trades men are warned 
against accepting engagements in 
country towns of Australia without 
making inquiries, as there is evidence 
of attempts being made to effect re- 
ductions in wages in some instances 
that have come under notice. 

At a recent meeting of the Bris- 
bane (Australia) Clothing Trade (Fe- 
male Employes) Union the organizer. 
Miss Olive Patterson, presented a re- 
port of her work, and concluded by 
nominating 30 candidates for mem- 
bership. Altogether about 50 new 
members were admitted to the union. 

In consequence of the recent street- 
car strike in Sydney, notice has been 
given in the Xew South Wales Legis- 
lative Assembly of the introduction 
of a bill to provide for regulating 
trade-unions, and the protection of 
funds thereof, to amend the law re- 
lating to conspiracy in certain re- 
spects, and to amend the Trade 
Unions Act and Industrial Dispute 
Act. 

The conditions of unemployment at 
Glasgow arc worse than in most of 
tin- other British cities, there I 
22,000 men seeking work at that 
place. Sunderland has 13,000 unem- 
ployed; Birmingham, 10,000; Liver- 
pool, 14,000; Manchester, 8000, and 
other cities from 1000 to 5000 each. 
These figures do not include the army 
of strikers in the Lancashire cotton 
trade. Distress funds are being raised. 

The New Zealand correspondent of 
the Sydney Telegraph says: The con- 
dition of the labor market in New 
Zealand just now is such that un- 
skilled laborers should nol come lure 
from other countries. * * * The rent 
problem, always serious in New Zea- 
land, has, of course, been acute among 
these people, and their families have 
had in a great many cases to appeal 
for help to charitable organization-. 



K 




Seamen's 

Institute 

242 STEUART STREET 
San Francisco 



— «U0CIMT ABCHnTCTJ. 



Rooms $1.50 Weekly and up. 
Per Night, 25 cents. 

Baths, Baggage Room. 
Postoftice, Savings Bank. 



fjjBITBOSr'Fl 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



TS 





SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LIPPMAN 


BROS. 


532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernest 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Union Goods for Union 


Men 



G. 



Jurgensen, II. 

Karadxa, i;«s. 
Kelsen, Carls 



Absolonsen, Ole M. Johnson, 
Agostino, Falletti -1899 

Althouse, Gustaf 
Andersen, Emit 
Andersen, Fred. J. 
Andersen, Tom -538 Kesse, Teodor. 
Anderson, Chas. Kirst, Hans 

Anderson, Kdwart Klaesson, Kar 
Anderson, Axel P. package. 
Anderson, Oscar Klausen, Karl 
Anderson, J. Klein, J. -378 

Andersson, Anders Kristensen, W. 
Kuhl, Herman 



W. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices, We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. B RO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I (any a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

him. Loos.- labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

V1ARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 



LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



C. L. MUNSON 

Dealer in 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS. 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



When making purchases from our ad- 
vertisers, always mention the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Terkel Olsen, a native of Treungen, 
Norway, aged 56, is inquired for by 
his brother. Address Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



H. 
Arnesen, Karl A. 
Axelsson, C. B. 
Backus, C. 
Bade, Alexander 
Baily, Joe 
BarnhllL J. F. 

icn, Herman 
Bauchwitz, Fritz 
Bauer, Gosta 
Behrens, G. 
Behrsln, J. 
Benard, Sandalio 
Berggren, John 
Bergh, Borge 
Berntsen, Ole 
Bernhardren. C. 
Bitter, Herman 
Bogdon, Wilhelm 
Bolander, J. E. 

Broback. Charles E. Lundstedt, Ch. 
Brose, R. Maack, Hans 

Brown, Joe Madson, James 

Brusbard, Ewalt Maki, Ivar 

Bush, P. Manley, Charlie 

Cappello, H. Martin, John B. 

Caratza, ConstantinMattson, H. J. 

A. Mi I'arland, Dugald 

Carlson, August McKenzie, James 
Carson, August Mikkelson. C. 

Celley, Edward Murray, Joseph 

Christensen, Christ Nestor, W. C. 
Christensen, W. 1179Nielsen. M. P. 
Chrstensen, J. -1164Nielsen, W. -1000 
Christensen, Harry Nielsen, Gustave 
Christensen, Gus, Nilsson, Johan 



Lalne, A. 

Lane, Casper 
Lange, Friderik 
Larsen, Magie 
Larsen, F. -1113 
Larsen, C. L. -1202 
Lewis. T. If, 
Lieberman, -1157 
Liebermann, George 

-1157 
Lindall, George 
Llndgren, A. -870 
Lindholm, A. 
Linman, A. W. 
Logothetis, Pana- 

gotis 
Lonnecke, Aug. -1321 
Luman, Alku 
Lund, W. -1341 



1054 

Christiansen, -901 
Colombay, Louis 

ten, -1156 
Bbapanen, W, 
Ehnke, W. 
Ekeland. Sigurd 



Nilsen, It. 
Nilsen, Carl P. -143 
Nilson, U. -S77 
Nisson, Louis 
Nodeland, George E. 
Xoidblom, Ben 
Nordin. M 



ESngebretsen, Mar-Norkamp, Richard 

kus Norman, L. 

Erickson, August Olsen, C 



Olsen, W. -753 
Orten. Sigurd 
Ostlin, Frank 
Pagel, Erwin 
Pautanldo, S., rg. let 
Petersen, W. -1284 
Peterson, Nicolous 
Pettersen, Alfred 



-571 
Ericksson, C. E. 
Bskbom, Arvid 
Fa Ik. P. J. 
I-VUis, P. L. 
Fjeldstad. John 
Fryland, C. J. 
Geisler, Hans 

Goumas, C, r'g. let.Rau, R. K. 
Grantley, W. G. Reek, John 

(Package) Robeson, Michael 

Greveit, Joe Robinson, Alen 

Custafson, A. K. -600Robsham, Jens W. 
Guthree, Raymond Rodriquez, Manuel 
Hammond, J. A. Rosan, Oscar 

Hansberg, J. B. Sardls, Vassllas 

Hansen, Alfred -1732 Savonius. B. 
Hansen, Haakon Scarabosio, Mario 

Hansen, Laurits A.Schlosher, Ludwlg 
Hanson, Frank Schwartz, F. -1269 

Hanson, Jacob Sebeline. C. 

Haydn, A. E. Bella, Gustav F. 

Hedman, John N. Sillin, George 
Hickman, Fred Skand, C. Johansen 



Hi Ike, Carl 
Holmen, George 
Holmgren, Joel 
lngbretsen, -868 
Ipsen. Edward S. 



Smith, J. S. 
Sorln, Kristlan 
Steen, Emil 
Steen, I. -1999 
Steen, Ed 



Jacob'son, John -1341Svedstrup, E 
Jamiesen, J. Svensson, Nikola ns 

Janson. Chas. Swanson, G. 

lanson F. -1911 Sylvian. Le Bloa 

n. R. -1754 Thompson. Frederick 

Jensen! J. H. -1311 Thoren, Oust 
Johann'sen, Chris- Tuominen. Alfred 

tian Uggla, Alfred 

Johansen, C. -1593 Ulke, E. 
Johansen, Hans Wahlstedt, Rafael 

Johansson, Johan 880Wickstrand. .J. 
John. Robert Wiksten, Arvid 

Johndahl, Harry Wills, George 
Johnson, A. -1451 Woker, H. 
Jonasson, C. A. Young, Charles 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Simpson, better known as 
Jack Simpson, age 32, who has sailed 
out of New York on the Portland 
Line, is inquired for by his relatives, 
Mr. J. Childs, 208 McDougall street, 
Riooklyn, N. Y., or communicate with 
the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's 
Union, IS Union street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The harkentine Benicia was enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 14, with J. 
T. Hayes as master. 

The schooner Fred J. Wood was enrolled at 
the San Francisco Custom-house on October 13 
with Ole Monsen as master. 

William Jensen was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on October 14 as master of 
the schooner Rosella, vice C. Le Grand. 

R. B. Seike was recorded at the San Francisco 
Custom-house on October 16 as master of the 
steamer Defiance, vice John G. Trapp. 

George Hammer was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on October 13 as master of 
the steamer Arctic, vice John Bostram. 

The Estevan wireless telegraph station, on the 
west coast of Vancouver Island, on October 12 
picked up a message being sent to Honolulu from 
the Farallon Island station. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 16: Steam- 
er Carlos, John Roberts, master; schooner Metha 
Nelson, E. Jensen, master. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 17: Steam- 
er Modoc, B. N. Rideout, master; steamer El 
Capitan, Christopher R. Heath, master. 

Two additions were made to the overdue list on 
October 14. They were: Bark Crocodile, 116 
days out from Barry for Talcahuano, 8 per cent; 
baric Thetis, 121 days out from Liverpool for 
Callao. 

Halvor Sorcnsen, carpenter of the Norwegian 
steamer Guernsey, died at the Good Samaritan 
Hospital at Portland, Or., on October 10 from a 
malady said to be unknown to the physicians who 
attended him. 

The following changes of masters were record- 
ed at the San Francisco Custom-house on Octo- 
ber 17: Steamer Goliah. C. C. Titchworth, vice 
T. Tonnesson; steamer Comet, Walter E. Tyler, 
vice Harold Seaborn. 

The steamer Lennox, which arrived at Victoria, 
B. C, on October 11 from Japan with a cargo of 
5000 tons of general freight, brought a large 
shipment of sealskins taken by Japanese sealing 
schooners consigned to London. 

The following changes of masters were record- 
ed at the San Francisco Custom-house on October 
10: Steamer North Fork, J. D. Jacobs, vice John 
Nelson; steamer Goliah. T. Tonnesson, vice Cas- 
par Titchworth; steamer lolando, Svante Engdalt, 
vice G. Schrappacasse. 

The steamer Temple E. Dorr, with A. M. Pan- 
zer as master, was enrolled at the San Francisco 
Custom-house on October 15. The Dorr, which 
sailed from Willapa lumber laden fot the South 
Coast, was obliged to put into San Francisco 
on the 15th for a supply of coal. 

The first of the homing seal fleet, the schooner 
Jessie, arrived at Victoria, B. C, on October 15, 
with five seal otter skins and 471 sealsk.ns. 
News was brought that the eight schooners from 
Victoria had 3868 sealskins, about double the 
catch made by twelve schooners last year. 

Hard luck seems to have followed the Ameri- 
can ship Astral. The vessel, while bound from 
Baltimore for San Francisco, passed through a 
terrific hurricane, which nearly wrecked her, and 
has been towed into New York, showing the 
effects of the strenuous time she passed through. 
The first consignment from the whalers in 
northern waters was brought to San Francisco on 
October 12 bv the steamer Sibyl Marston. which 
arrived seven days from Tyee. The Sibyl brought 
2200 barrels of whale oil, 200 tons of guano, 100 
barrels of fins and tails and five tons of whale- 
bone. 

Dispatches have been received bv the Rio 
Janeiro agents of the Lamport and Holt steam- 
ship line that the steamer Velasquez is a total 
wreck at Cella Point, near Santos. Private ad- 
vices state, however, that she is stranded on the 
rocks, and though seriously damaged may yet 
be saved. 

Navigation closed on the Upper \ ukon on 
October 15. when the steamers White Horse and 
Casca arrived from Dawson with 400 passengers, 
many of them from Fairbanks and other lower 
river points. Tee is running in the Yukon and 
the first cold snap will likely sec the close of 
the river. 

The codfishing schooner Dora Bluhm arrived 
at San Francisco on October 16, fortv-six days 
from Okhotsk Sea. She brought 120.000 codfish 
for the Pacific States Trading Company. On 
August 15 the Dora Bluhm spoke the schooner 
W. H. Dimond. bound for San Francisco with 
110.000 codfish. 

Tiie following changes of masters were record- 
ed at (lie San Francisco Custom-house on October 
12: Schooner Wavelet, Desidereo Figueis, vice 
John Busch; steamer Sea Queen, R. Rasmusscn, 
vice T. Tonncssen; schooner R. W. Bartlett, 
Matheas Olsen. vice F. T. Olsen, reported from 
Port Townscnd. 

United Stales Marshal Hopkins, of Seattle, 
Wash., has received instructions by cable from 
Valdez, Alaska, to subpoena Miss Mabel Benedict 
of the Jessie I.ce Home at Unalaska and hold her 
as a witness before the Grand Jury at Valdez 



in the charges she recently preferred against the 
men in the revenue-cutter service. 

The Trans-Mississippi Congress, in session at 
San Francisco on October 10 adopted a resolution 
favoring the establishment by the Government 
of a line of steamships between San Francisco 
and Central American ports, made provisional on 
the failure of the Pacific Mail Steamship Com- 
pany to improve its present service. 

It has been practically decided by the under- 
writers to abandon the wreck of the steamer 
Aeon, which several weeks ago struck on a reef 
off Christmas Island. It was at first thought 
that the steamer might be salved, and there was 
some talk of Lloyd's dispatching a salvage ex- 
pedition from Vancouver or Victoria, B. C. 

The following vessels have been spoken: Au- 
gust 24, latitude 5 north, longitude 13 west, French 
bark Alice, from London for Oregon; September 
3, latitude 5 north, longitude 21 west, French 
bark Marechal Suthet, from Glasgow for Tacoma; 
September 25, latitude 20 south, longitude 38 west, 
French bark Eugene Schneider, from Antwerp 
for Oregon. 

The Dolbeer and Carson Lumber Company's 
schooner Lottie Carson, which has been laid up 
at Eureka, Cal., with the others of the company's 
sailing fleet, will go into commission again this 
week and will commence loading lumber for the 
South. It is expected that the Bertha Dolbeer 
and the Azalea, the other vessels of_ the fleet 
tied up at Eureka, will soon follow suit. 

The cable supply schooner Flaurence Ward 
sailed from Honolulu, T. H., for Midway October 
2. Besides suplies for the cable colony there, she 
look a number of hogs and some cattle, stock 
and chickens. Sufficient soil has been carried to 
Midway in the past to start grass and trees, 
and now there is herbage and forage enough 
there to support live stock and chickens, which 
will now lie raised to supply a little colony with 
fresh food. 

The British ship Leicester Castle, which had 
been on the overdue list for some time, quoted 
for reinsurance at a rate of 15 per cent, is in 
the harbor of Montevideo dismasted, according to 
idvices received at San Francisco on October 11. 
The Leicester Castle was picked up at sea almost 
a derelict by the oil tank steamer Washtenaw and 
towed into the South American port. She was 
out 151 days from Cardiff for Pisagua and had 
not been reported. 

A letter was received at the Custom-house at 
Astoria, Or., on October 17, from Charles Earl, 
acting secretary of the Department of Commerce 
and Labor at Washington, stating that the $5000 
fine recently imposed by Collector McGregory 
on the Norwegian steamship Guernsey has been 
mitigated to $25. The Guernsey, which arrived 
at Astoria on September 26 from Shanghai via 
Moji, was fined for failure to bring a Consular 
bill of health from the former port. 

United States District Judge De Haven handed 
down a decision at San Francisco on October 15, 
awarding Peter Spellman, a seaman, $50 dam- 
ages in his admiralty suit against Captain George 
Winkel and the J. Marhoffer- Steamship Com- 
pany. It was alleged that on August 18, 1908. 
Captain Winkel pulled Spellman's mustache and 
boxed his ears. The court held that the injuries 
inflicted were slight, but that if Captain Winkel 
did not pay "the judgment, the J. Marhoffer 
Steamship Company must do so. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on October 16: Ship Toxteth, 228 
days from Port Talbot, 90 per cent; ship Jupiter, 
183 days from Liverpool for Puget Sound, 10 
per cent; ship Acamas, 175 days from Rotterdam 
for San Francisco. 10 per cent; bark Cadowan, 
127 days from Penco for Queenstown, 25 per 
cent; ship Thornliebank, 130 days from Caleta 
Buena for Bilbao, 8 per cent; bark Criccieth 
Castle, 143 days from Barry for Mejillones, 25 
per cent; bark Crocodile, 118 days from Barry 
for Talcahuano, 8 per cent. 

The steamer Empress of China, which arrived 
at Victoria, B. C, on October 17, brought news 
that suppressed reports of raids by Japanese 
sealers at Copper Island have been made public 
with the return of the Japanese sealing fleet. In 
April last Japanese schooners appeared off the 
rookery and landed a raiding party. While the 
scalers were clubbing seals on the hauling 
grounds Russian guards appeared and fired on 
them, driving off the raiders. The schooner 
Miyo Maru. one of the vessels engaged in the 
raid, afterward was seized seven miles from the 
island by the cruiser Shilka. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 125 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 



CHICAGO, 111. 



St. 



MILWAUKEE, 
BUFFALO, N. 



143 West Madison 

Branches: 
Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 North Third St. 
ASHLAND, Wis., 515 East Second St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 222 State St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., »8 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio,. Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



For good beds and clean rooms, go to "THE 
HARRISON," 456 Harrison street, corner of 
First, San Francisco. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 


m i i r? m a i 


VJ V / U 1 \. IN /~V 1 — 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 


THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 


Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1908. 



TAFT AND EXCLUSION. 



Tlie supreme importance of the issue of 
"Government by Injunction" in the present 
political campaign is indicated by the fact 
that it has so far almost completely over- 
shadowed the issue of Asiatic Exclusion. It 
would be difficult, if not impossible, to imag- 
ine any question, other than that involved in 
the first-named issue, which could even mo- 
mentarily obscure the issue of Exclusion, at 
least in the minds of the people in the West. 
That issue has been a vital consideration in 
California and other Western States ever 
since the settlement of that territory by the 
white man. To-day, notwithstanding the issue 
of Exclusion has long been regarded as hav- 
ing been settled, and "settled right," that issue 
is as much alive as ever, and likely to become 
more so unless present tendencies are cor- 
rected. 

The revival of the Exclusion issue is due 
to the attitude assumed by the Republican 
party in the matter. The national platform 
of that party contains no reference to the 
subject of Exclusion, an omission which, 
when considered in connection with the well- 
known attitude of the party's candidate for 
the Presidency, is more suggestive than any 
words could be. 

Several weeks ago the Journal reproduced 
the views of Mr. Taft on the subject of Ex- 
clusion, delivered in a public address at Miami 
University. For the benefit of our readers 
we again reproduce Mr. Taft's words, as fol- 
lows : 

Ought we to throw away the advantage which 
we have by reason of Chinese natural friendship 
for us, and continue to enforce an unjustly severe 
law, and thus create in the Chinese mind a dis- 
position to boycott the American trade and to 
drive our merchants from the Chinese shores, 
simply because we are afraid that we may for the 
time lose the approval of certain unreasonable 
and extreme popular leaders of California and 
other Coast States? Does the question not an- 
swer itself? Is it not the duty of members of 
Congress and of the Executive to disregard the 
unreasonable demands of a part of the com- 
munity deeply prejudiced upon the subject in the 
Far West, and insist on extending justice and 
courtesy to a people from whom we are deriving 
and are likely to derive such immense benefit in 
the way of international trade? 

When these views were uttered it was sus- 
pected that their publication was in the nature 



of a "feeler," designed to test the temper of 
the public. This suspicion was confirmed 
within a few days by the issuance of an "Ex- 
ecutive Order," directing the Chinese inspec- 
tors to impose no unnecessary hardship upon 
Chinese applying for admission to the coun- 
try, upon pain of "instant dismissal." Under 
the circumstances, such an order was natu- 
rally construed by the officials as a notice to 
let up in the matter of examining Chinese im- 
migrants. 

Adopting Mr. Taft's own suggestion, and 
construing his party's attitude by what he 
himself says, rather than by what the party 
platform says or fails to say, it is quite evi- 
dent that if Mr. Taft be elected, we may an- 
ticipate a re-opening of the Exclusion ques- 
tion and a modification of the present Exclu- 
sion laws. The mere possibility of such an 
outcome should impel the voters of California 
and all other Western States to oppose the 
Republican candidates for Executive and Leg- 
islative offices. It must be borne in mind that 
it was only by non-partisan action — by the 
uniting of Democrats and Republicans upon 
an issue that was bigger than any mere party 
question — that Exclusion legislation was first 
forced from Congress. Whatever views the 
members of that body may have entertained 
concerning the "injustice" or "inexpediency" 
of the Exclusion bill, they realized that their 
failure to pass that bill might lose their party 
the electoral votes of the Western States. 
So they swallowed their scruples for the sake 
of their party. 

Only by a repetition of united action, with- 
out reference to party attitude upon other 
matters, can the people of the West hope to 
maintain the laws secured by such action in 
the past, to say nothing of securing any ex- 
tension of these laws. That the Republican 
party, by the significant omission from its 
platform, and the Republican administration, 
by the open declarations of its leading offi- 
cials, Mr. Roosevelt and Mr. Taft, are on rec- 
ord in opposition to Asiatic Exclusion is in- 
disputable. The issue is clearly made. Every 
vote cast for the Republican candidates for 
the Presidency and Congress is a vote cast 
against Exclusion and in favor of inviting 
the yellow man to a contest with the white 
man for supremacy on American soil. 



The political campaign has evidently reached 
the roorback stage. The report that certain 
advertisements in the September issue of the 
American Federationist were inserted as a 
means of "paying Samuel Gompers in a secret 
manner for doing a thing which the Standard 
Oil Company wanted him to do — that is, sup- 
port the Democratic ticket," is entitled to be 
classed as a stroke of genius — or would be if 
it were not so transparently absurd. Fortu- 
nately, the American workingman, for whose 
intelligence the press affects so much regard, 
is intelligent enough to see in the Standard 
Oil roorback merely another signal of distress 
in the headquarters of the anti-labor forces. 



The article reproduced in this issue from 
the American Federationist is a clear state- 
ment of the labor issue in the political cam- 
paign. Every citizen interested in learning 
the truth concerning that issue should read 
the article and learn the truth. 



MAGUIRE CLUB AT WORK. 



Are you in favor of the shorter workday? 
Then, do your shopping early, and give the 
clerks a chance to become acquainted with 
their families. 



The Water Front Maguire Club held a 
well-attended meeting in Sailors' Union Hall, 
San Francisco, on the 15th inst. The atten- 
dance was representative of the various mari- 
time and water front crafts, and the greatest 
enthusiasm was manifested. Addresses were 
made by Judge Robert Ferral and others. 
Judge Maguire, who was received with a great 
demonstration of the regard in which he is 
held by the men on the water front, delivered 
a very able address, which was listened to 
with intense interest. 

At the close of the addresses the Club pro- 
ceeded to organize permanently. The tem- 
porary officers (published in last week's Jour- 
nal) were made permanent, and the follow- 
ing executive committee was elected : Patrick 
Flynn, Thomas J. Kennedy, Eugene Steidle, 
H. Huntsman, J. Dolan, John McLaughlin 
and John Kean. The Club has established 
headquarters at 9 Mission street, where litera- 
ture and information may be obtained. A 
complete canvass of the water front will be 
made and every means adopted to insure the 
election of Judge Maguire. The active inter- 
est taken in the candidacy of Judge Maguire 
by his friends in all parts of the District has 
already created a feeling of confidence in the 
outcome of the contest. With a continuance 
of the work now well under way, the result 
may be regarded as morally certain. Judge 
Maguire will undoubtedly resume his seat in 
Congress as the representative from the 
Fourth Congressional District of California. 



WORK OF THE FEDERATION. 



The recent convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor transacted much 
business of importance to the labor movement 
of the State. Of course, the largest part of 
the convention's time was devoted to the con- 
sideration of legislation to be submitted to the 
Legislature which meets in January. Among 
the more important of these measures are the 
following: Direct Primary; Initiative and 
Referendum ; Recall ; abolition of the payment 
of wages in discountable paper, and reducing 
the period during which employes may be 
kept waiting for their wages ; regulating em- 
ployment agencies ; regulating the employ- 
ment of private detectives; for the sanitary 
construction of bakehouses ; improving the 
Child Labor law ; regulating the hours of 
street-carmen, and increasing the efficiency of 
the State Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

The attendance of delegates was larger than 
usual, and the utmost harmony prevailed 
throughout the sessions. The following offi- 
cers were elected: 

President, A. M. Thompson, Oakland; first 
vice-president, D. M. Sullivan, Sacramento ; 
second vice-president, M. T. Murray, San 
Jose; third vice-president, W. G. Ross, Val- 
lejo; fourth vice-president, T. A. Seaward, 
Fresno; fifth vice-president, D. J. Murray, 
San Francisco; sixth vice-president, J. K. 
Thompson, San Francisco; seventh vice-pres- 
ident, Frank Steffens, San Francisco; eighth 
vice-president, Joseph Guine, Oakland ; ninth 
vice-president, John W. Ericksen, Eureka ; 
secretary-treasurer, George Bell, San Fran- 
cisco. San Rafael was chosen as the meet- 
ing place of the next convention. 



That "labor vote" is almost ready for 
"delivery," despite the fact that Mr. Gom- 
pers, unless he still maintains his residence in 
New York City, won't vote at all. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BE CANDID, GENTLEMEN. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



We regret exceedingly that President Roose- 
velt has attempted to defend or justify Judge 
Taft's injunction record, or his speeches on the 
subject. It is particularly unfortunate that the 
President should have unnecessarily thrust him- 
self into the campaign on the injunction issue. 
We should have preferred to accept his previous 
utterances on the injunction abuse. In his mes- 
sage to the last Congress President Roosevelt 
said: 

"Instances of abuses in the granting of injunc- 
tions in labor disputes continue to occur, and the 
resentment in the minds of those who feel that 
their rights are being invaded and their liberty 
of action and of speech unwarrantably restrained 
continues likewise to grow." 

Yet, in the letter which we have just quoted, 
President Roosevelt takes an attitude from which 
we must respectfully, yet most emphatically, dis- 
sent. 

Very well, so are we content to rest Mr. Taft's 
case on his injunction history. Organized labor 
throughout the country has already declared over- 
whelmingly against Mr. Taft on that very point. 
He is known as "the injunction standard bearer." 
His history as the promoter of the abuse of the 
injunction power is too well known to need re- 
counting at this time. But it may not be amiss 
to call attention here to the fact that Justice 
Gould of the District of Columbia, in issuing the 
injunction of the Van Cleave Buck's Stove and 
Range Co. against the officers of the American 
Federation of Labor, its affiliated organizations, 
and their members, stated in his opinion accom- 
panying the injunction that it was based upon the 
precedents furnished by Judge Taft's injunctions. 

This Van Cleave Buck's Stove and Range in- 
junction is an invasion of the right of free press 
and free speech. For their temerity in upholding 
these constiutional rights President Gompers, 
Secretary Morrison, and Vice-President John 
Mitchell, of the American Federation of Labor, 
are now haled before the court in contempt pro- 
ceedings to "show cause" why they should not 
be sent to jail for this exercise of constitutional 
rights, which are alleged by Mr. Van Cleave to 
be in violation of the injunction and hence in 
contempt of court. 

This very case has its origin in the fact that 
Republican Congresses- have steadily refused to 
remedy the abuse of the injunction in labor cases. 
And neither the Republican party or its candi- 
date, Mr. Taft,- declare for or promise any relief. 

Mr. Taft has never done other than uphold and 
defend injunction abuses. He has never in any 
public utterance intimated that he would favor 
the enactment of Labor's measure (Pearre Bill, 
H. R. No. 94) to limit and define the injunction 
power. Until he does that it will not be of much 
avail for President Roosevelt to say pleasant 
things about him to the wage-workers. 

We respectfully inform President Roosevelt 
that he is mistaken when he says, "no responsible 
organization would hesitate to condemn the 
abuses against which Judge Taft's injunctions 
were aimed." The exact contrary is the fact. 
Not one responsible organization (unless Van 
Cleave's organization is so regarded) can be found 
to endorse Judge Taft's injunctions. 

President Roosevelt and Judge Taft and the 
lattcr's adherents talk vaguely about the remedy 
for the injunction abuse, when they admit that 
there is any abuse at all. But they go no further 
than to repeat what the Republican party plat- 
form declares — that is. that they favor a hearing 
or notice to both parties concerned, but not even 
that notice to be given when so-called "irrepa- 
rable injury" is implied or alleged. And it is not 
amiss to say that not one iniunction has ever 
been petitioned for or granted by a court which 
. does not claim irreparable injury about to be in- 
flicted. In other words, their declarations are in 
exact accord with and an endorsement of, the 
present practice and abuse of the injunction 
process. 

Take the qualifying terms Judge Taft used in 
discussing Labor in his speech of acceptance. He 
hvpotheticallv justifies the injunction which the 
Van Cleave Buck's Stove and Range Company 
has secured against the American Federation of 
Labor, its officers, affiliated organizations, and 
the great rank and file of labor. All that Judge 
Taft need to have done in his speech of accept- 
ance to have made his position convincing upon 
that point was to have named the Van Cleave 
Buck's Stove and Range Company instead of the 
hypothetical third person, and the case would 
have been complete and his position made clear 
that even those who run may read. 

Tndeed the very iniunction abuse which Presi- 
dent Roosevelt so severely attacked in his mes- 
sage to Congress above quoted had its beginnings 
in the injunctions issued by Judge Taft. 

And we ask, is it not a peculiar thing that 
theorists, academicians, and interested politicians 
declare that Judge Taft's injunctions are fair, that 
they can be endured and need little, if any, modi- 
fication bv law. while, on the other hand, the 
men of labor with their experience and the suf- 
ferings which they have endured by reason of 
Judge Taft's injunctions, attack and denounce 
them and insist upon remedi-il legislation? 

No. it is not strange. The first-mentioned class 
can afford to live under the present practice in- 
augurated by Judge Taft's injunctions. They can 



defer relief until eternity. It does not affect 
them; but the workers have endured the wrongs 
long enough and insist upon remedial legislation, 
not at some future time, but now, and propose to 
take the necessary action in this campaign to 
achieve that end. 

The Republican party and its candidate for 
President endorse the abuse of the injunction 
process and only promise to put a few patches on 
the method of administering the abuse. 

Thank you, gentlemen; Labor is not looking 
for a sugar coating to the sawdust pill. It de- 
clines the injunction quack prescription, which 
would intensify the malady. Judge Taft's Re- 
publican party platform's prescribed cure is worse 
than the disease itself. It will surely make the 
situation only more acute and intolerable. 

The doing of a wrong does not become right 
because notice is given that the wrong will be 
done. 

Labor is not partisan. It is neither Republican 
nor Democratic nor does it owe allegiance to 
any other political party. It is to-day, and pro- 
poses to continue, absolutely independent from 
party domination; yet in this campaign Labor 
realizes that the Republican party and its candi- 
date stand committed against the relief and the 
justice which it must have. The Democratic party 
and its candidate have openly and courageously 
made Labor's demands their own. The toilers of 
America and the thinking, sympathetic, liberty- 
loving citizens of our country will have no hesi- 
tancy in making their choice. 

Mr. Taft, the Republican candidate, has en- 
dorsed and accentuated his party's repudiation of 
Labor's just demands. 

Mr. Bryan, the candidate of the Democratic 
party has fully endorsed Labor's demands. 
Workers, choose between them. 

WE NOW CALL UPON THE WORKERS 
OF OUR COMMON COUNTRY TO STAND 
FAITHFULLY BY OUR FRIENDS, OPPOSE 
AND DEFEAT OUR ENEMIES, WHETHER 
THEY BE CANDIDATES FOR PRESIDENT, 
FOR CONGRESS, OR OTHER OFFICES, 
WHETHER EXECUTIVE, LEGISLATIVE, 
OR JUDICIAL. 



EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY IN FRANCE. 



The Paris correspondent of the London 
Commercial Intelligence states that all en- 
gaged in the metallurgic industry in France 
are now beginning to feel the financial ef- 
fects of the Act which renders the employer 
civilly responsible for the accidents to his 
workmen. He adds : 

The metallurgic industry is being very 
hard hit in this respect. I have before me a 
return showing the number of cases brought 
before the courts for compensation, and I 
see that in the metallurgic industry alone no 
less than 6,318 cases came before the courts 
of France during the three months ending 
December 31, 1907. The number of acci- 
dents causing death was 264, and in addition 
to the compensation awarded to those who 
recovered life annuities were awarded to 
192 widows, and annual allowances, till of 
age, to no less than 308 children. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Oct. 12, 1908. 
Situation quiet. 

A. McKECHNIE, Acting Secretary. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1908. 
Situation unchanged; shipping very slow. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary, 
55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., .Oct. 13, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
l^A Lewis St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Oct. 13. 1008. 
Situation quiet. 

TI. P. GRIFFIN, Secretary. 
42 South St. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 19, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slack. Andrew Furuseth spoke 
at length on the condition of seamen and labor 
in general in the various European countries. 

NOTICF: The election of the delegates to the 
New Orleans convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America will take place at the 
regular meetings held at Headquarters and 
Branches on November 2. 

E. ELLISON, Secretary pro tern. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Agency, Oct. 10, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation un- 
changed 

A. E. SIMMONDS, Agent. 
Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 12, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects better. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 12, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 12, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Situation slightly 
improved. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 

Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 12, 1908. 
Shipping slack; prospects better. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Oct. 12, 1908. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 11, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum; shipping quiet. 

ERNEST HORLIN, Agent pro tern. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 12, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency,' Oct. 7, 1908. 
Shipping slow. 

JOSEPH T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 15, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping quiet. Balloting for delegates 
to the convention of the I. S. U. of A. will take 
place for four consecutive meetings at Head- 
quarters and the Branches, beginning October 
22, 1908. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 8, 1908. 
No meeting; shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUFR, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 8, 1908. 
No meeting; shipping poor. 

CI I AS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2155. 



DIED. 

Quincy Ward McBeth, No. 1731, a native of 
Florida, aged 25, died on the steamer Umatilla, 
at San Francisco, Cat, on October 14, 1908. 

Nils Christian Petersen, No. 1118, a native of 
Denmark, aged 25, drowned from the steam 
schooner Marshfield, at Needle Rock, Cal., on 
October 8, 1908. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 



ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 



*£>>&* 



DUTIES OF MEMBERS. 



The Seamen's Union, like all labor organiza- 
tion^ is simply a large number of individual 
workers banded together for the purpose of 
securing better conditions for all. Whatever 
strength and stability the Union may be pos- 
sessed of comes from and by the acts of its 
members. 

It is upon the voluntary actions and the com- 
mon sense of a majority of its members that 
the Union must depend for results ; they hold 
absolute authority over the organization. The 
officers of the Union, no matter how great 
their qualifications may be, can at best plan, 
advise and help to direct the course of the or- 
ganization, but it is upon the good will of the 
members that the whole structure rests. 

Seamen on the Great Lakes, whose unions 
arc now being attacked by the shipowners, 
should bear in mind that the outcome of the 
present struggle will be good or bad just as 
the majority of the union men, by their acts, 
determine it shall be. 

Loyalty to each other and to the whole as 
represented by the union will bring success. 
Bui such loyalty must consist of live, deter- 
mined, consistent and persistent action. 

The passive, inactive loyalty of the member 
who contents himself by simply paying his 
dues and taking no further interest in the or- 
ganization, does not constitute good unionism. 
Such a member is like a soldier who, having 
enlisted in the army, refuses to take part in 
its battles, believing that his full duty has been 
performed by simply enrolling his name and 
wearing a uniform. 

The good union man, who understands his 
full duty, is an ardent, enthusiastic, hustling 
member of the army of labor, helping to fight 
its battles, defending its position, advocating its 
doctrines, encouraging his comrades, and con- 
stantly winning recruits and friends for the 
good cause. 

It is upon ' such good union men that the 
Seamen's Union must now depend. The de- 
velopments of the past season have proved that 
there is more than a sufficient number of such 
active, energetic members to insure success. 
Those who are familiar with the growth of the 
unions on the Great Lakes, and who have 
watched the behavior of the members during 
the trying times of the past six or seven months 
will not hesitate to say emphatically that the 
seamen will "deliver the goods." 

The vesselowners are now engaged in ' a 
fight against the unions on the Lakes. They 
have been at the job about six or seven months 
now, and in spite of the desperate means re- 
sorted to by the shipowners the unions remain 
as solid as ever. But union seamen should 
not permit themselves to become careless or 
to feel too secure on account of the fact that 
the employers have so far failed to materially 
injure the organizations. They must not for- 
get that the fight is still on, and that in a 
struggle of this kind every man counts. 

It is the duty of every member to earnestly 
strive to awaken in all seamen a full sense of 
their obligation to the organization and to 
teach their comrades that loyalty to the Union 
is necessary for their future welfare, that it is 
simply fidelity to each other, and that to stand 
by the Union is the only way to show faith- 
fulness to their fellow workers. 



Fraternalism, good-fellowship and brotherly 
understanding among union seamen should be 
aroused to the highest pitch attainable. No 
effort should be spared to accomplish this dur- 
ing the coming winter. Every member must 
help. Success depends upon it. The future 
wellbeing of every individual seaman on the 
Great Lakes is at stake. 

Much can and doubtless will be done by the 
officers of the unions during the next few 
months, but every union man must remember 
that all of the work must have the active and 
earnest co-operation of the individual mem- 
bers. 

The member who doesnot fully understand 
how he can perform his share of the work to 
be done should make it his business to consult 
with an officer of his union, especially so if he 
happens to be one of the many members who 
spend the winters in the smaller cities and 
towns where no union hall or office is main- 
tained. 

A campaign of education, to prepare for 
greater activities later on, has now begun. 
Every loyal union seaman should take an 
active part in the movement and endeavor to 
so strengthen and solidify the unions that no 
man shall ever have reason to say that the 
seamen of the Great Lakes were found want- 
ing when put to the test. 

Joshua Blunt. 



CANADIANS ON THE LAKES. 



The remarkable strides being made by 
Canadian Lake marine traffic is being noted 
with a feeling of uneasiness by big United 
States owners, as they see with the increas- 
ing of Canada's Lake shipping facilities a 
big dropping off in their own business. 
Canada has for many years depended largely 
on American boats alone for her shipping 
facilities, but for the past fifteen years Cana- 
dian vessels have been increasing in number 
until now the estimated market value of the 
Canadian fleet of grain vessels is $9,405,000. 
representing sixty-six registered steel freight 
boats. Fifteen years ago the Algonquin, 
Rosedale and ill-fated Bannockburn were 
the only Canadian steel vessels on the Lakes. 

Many of the boats in Canada's fleet are 
imported products, however, all of which 
were built in England and are distinctive 
types. I'.efore the present season closes sev- 
eral new vessels from across the ocean will 
be on the Great Lakes sailing the Canadian 
flag! Canadian vessels have done a larger 
amount of business this year than ever be- 
fore and during the first ten days of Septem- 
ber eight vessels under Canadian charters 
cleared from Uuluth with an aggregate cargo 
of 460,000 bushels of grain. 



The new port of Gary, Indiana, has been 
recognized by the Treasury Department 
with the app'ointment of a Deputy Collector 
of Customs. George R. Scott is the ap- 
pointee and has already opened an office in 
that city for the clearance of vessels. 

The Steel Corporation is sending a 
steamer a day to the new port. Receipts 
for the first full week were 69,000 tons of 
iron ore and since the harbor was opened 
87,100 tons have been received. 



TO CONTROL EMIGRATION. 



A recent issue of the journal of the Span- 
ish Labor Department contains the text of 
a law published on December 22 last, the 
object of which is to regulate and control 
the emigration of Spanish subjects. An 
emigrant is defined as a person who leaves 
the country as a third-class passenger for 
America, Asia, or Australasia. Persons 
liable to be called up for continuous military 
service are not allowed to emigrate, nor may 
married women do so without the consent 
of their husbands. Freedom to emigrate 
in the case of minors above the age of 15, 
who have not fulfilled their term of mili- 
tary service, and of those who belong to the 
first and second reserve, may be suspended 
at any time by royal decree. 

The law establishes a Higher Council of 
Emigration under the Ministry of the In- 
terior. Besides attending to certain special 
duties, such as the drawing up of regula- 
tions for the execution of the present law 
and the granting of permits to emigrant ves- 
sels, the Higher Council is to make to the 
Ministry of the Interior such suggestions re- 
garding the regulation of emigration as it 
considers advisable. The Council will also 
study the causes and effects of emigration 
from Spain in relation to emigration from 
other countries, and publish statistics and 
other information on this point. It will 
present an annual report on its operations. 

On the proposal of the Council the Min- 
istry of the Interior will establish Emigra- 
tion Committees at those ports selected 6 ir 
this purpose by the Council. These Com- 
mittees will be under the supervision of 
the Council. 



COAL ON THE LAKES. 



There is approximately 3,000,000 ton> ol 
bituminous coal and 1,000,000 tons of an- 
thracite coal on the docks at the head of the 
Lakes at the present time. It is an excep- 
tionally large supply for the middle of Sep- 
tember and is due to the fact that shipments 
from the head of the Lakes to the interior 
have been unusually backward during the 
summer and up to the present time this fall. 

In this connection it is interesting to note 
that the receipts of soft coal on Lake Su- 
perior this season have been nearly 2,000,- 
000 tons less than for the same period last 
year. To September 1 the receipts of soft 
coal on Lake Superior this year were 4,395,- 
000 tons in round numbers as compared with 
6,328,000 tons for the corresponding period 
in 1907. The exact shortage was 1,923,000 
tons. 

The receipts of hard coal on Lake Super- 
ior for the same period show an increase 
this season over last, to September 1. The 
receipts last year to that date were 631,000 
tons, and to the same date this year, 901,000 
tons, an increase of 270,000 tons. 

The backwardness of the demand for coal 
from the interior points is causing the coal 
Companies SOme anxiety. Many of the 
docks are crowded with coal and would like 
to ship more than at present to make room 
faster for more receipts. 



'COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



JOLTS BY JOSHUA. 

Keep at it. 



Hustle for the Union. 



Is your name on the Roll of Honor of the 
Lake Seamen's Union? 



Are your dues paid up for the winter, com- 
rade? How about your shipmates? 



Remember the old saying "United we stand ; 
divided we fall." By sticking together seamen 
can do much for themselves, but separated 
they will get "done" — plenty. 



Every good union man should make it his 
own particular business to help spread the 
doctrine of unionism among his fellow work- 
ers. The Union will be successful exactly in 
proportion to the number of members who en- 
deavor to help along the good cause. 



The success of the Seamen's Union, or of 
any other union, depends upon the members 
thereof. Every union man must contribute a 
little of his own ability and energy to the good 
work, and should do his utmost to increase the 
feeling of comradeship and brotherly love 
among union men. It is half the battle. Get 
busy ! 



When a union man voices disapproval of an 
officer or member of his union he should al- 
ways add a little praise for the union itself. 
Otherwise his listeners may get an impression 
that his criticism of an individual expresses his 
opinion of the whole organization. 



The amount of a man's wages determines, 
among other things, the following : 

What kind of a home he shall have, if any. 

Whether or not he may take unto himself a 
wife. 

How he and his family shall live. 

The quality of food they shall eat. 

The clothing they may wear. 

Whether his children shall go to school or 
factory. 

The pleasures he and his family may enjoy. 

Yet the vesselowners on the Lakes appear 
not to want to meet the seamen on equal foot- 
ing to discuss wages and working conditions, 
claiming that the shipowner has a right to 
dictate terms to the seamen. The organized 
seamen, however, are very naturally deter- 
mined to have something to say about such 
matters. 



While the vesselowner is engaged in an at- 
tempt to disrupt the seamen's unions, he is sure 
to continue to make some nice-sounding 
"promises" as to what good treatment, wages 
and conditions the seamen are going to have in 
the future, providing, of course, that they give 
up the Union. The vesselowner is in business 
for the money there is in it. He wants more 
profits. Less wages for seamen, more profits 
for owners. That is the way he figures it and 
that is why he wants the Union out of the way. 
Of course, the vesselowner is not going to ad- 
mit anything like that while the seamen con- 
tinue to maintain their wage-increasing and 
wage-maintaining instrument (the Union) in- 
tact. The shipowner realizes that fish can not 
be caught on a hook unless plenty of bail is 
put on to hide the sharp, barbed point. So he 
puts on lots of "bait" in the form of promises. 



The seamen, however, are wise enough to 
know that, if the bait is swallowed, the cruel 
hook necessarily goes with it, and the poor 
victim must suffer accordingly — and doesn't 
even get a chance to digest the bait, at that. 



Press reports, around the Great Lakes, state 
that the Lake Carriers' Association recently 
sent a representative to England for the pur- 
pose of investigating the treatment of seamen 
in that country with a view of discovering 
some "improvements" which can be applied to 
seamen on the Lakes. What's the game now ? 

Some years ago the English shipowners suc- 
ceeded in forcing English seamen into a so- 
called "benefit" scheme under the control of 
the vesselowners. It is known as the "Ship- 
ping Federation" and has proved to be the 
most rigid and cruel system of blacklisting 
ever directed against workingmen. 

As soon as the English shipowners got their 
"Federation" fastened upon the seamen they 
cut wages in half, in spite of all the promises 
they had made to the contrary. To still further 
reduce wages the shipowners placed Chinese 
and Japanese coolies aboard, until now over a 
third of England's merchant marine is manned 
by Asiatics. White, black or yellow, all sea- 
men were forced into the "Federation" and all 
felt its malignant, blighting effects. 

Is it this system, the shame of England, that 
the Lake Carriers' Association had in mind 
when its representative was sent to England to 
look for "improvements" ? 

Joshua Blunt. 



LIGHTS AT DULUTH. 



By a special arrangement, effected by the 
Lake Carriers' Association, a cluster of 
lights will be maintained at the outer end 
of the north pier at Duluth for the re- 
mainder of this season at the expense of the 
Association, the Lighthouse Department not 
having available funds. 

There are on the north pier six lights, 
carried by three iron lamp posts, which are 
already in place. Each post carries a white 
and a green light, four feet apart. Two of 
these posts stand on the pierhead, with the 
lights eleven feet above the parapet and 
twenty-eight feet above the lake surface. 
The third post is on the lower portion of 
the pier with lights eleven feet above the 
parapet and twenty feet above the Lake. 

Each light will consist of two thirty-two 
candle power incandescent electric lamps, 
inside of a glass globe eighteen inches high 
and fifteen inches wide. On each post the 
green light will appear on the right and the 
white light on the left hand side to a boat 
entering the canal. 

These lights are now started and will run 
from sunset to sunrise until the close of 
navigation. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Negotiations are under way between the 
Turbine Steamship Company and the Toron- 
to Shipyard Company for the construction 
of a steamer for the run between Toronto 
and Hamilton. The plans as drawn call for 
a boat 200 feet long and 30 feet beam, with 
an estimated speed of sixteen miles an hour. 



The steamer State of Michigan sunk five 
vears ago off White Lake harbor has been 
found by tlic Stand Salvage Company di- 
vers, covered with hundreds of tons of sand, 
100 feet south of where she disappeared. It 
will be impossible to raise the boat. 



E. J. Wheeler is inquired for by his sister, 
Mrs. Lillian Allen, 2619 J street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Comrade Walter Birrell will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Leonard Hull, R. F. D., 
No. 1, Hope, Mich. 

Second-Mate James Tobin, shipkeeper on 
the steamer Selwyn Eddy, at Milwaukee, is 
reported missing. 

Ed. Rathenow, No. 5388, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is inquired for by his sister, Mrs. Chris 
Marquist, 429 N. Clark street, Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Bonner, No. 7823, Lake Seamen's 
Union, is requested to communicate with his 
sister, who is very ill, at Kingston, Ontario. 

John Livingstone Ritchie, No. 21289, Lake 
Seamen's Union, is inquired for by his mother, 
Mrs. M. A. Ritchie, 283 N. Lisgar street, To- 
ronto, Ont. 

John McCormick, a marine fireman, who 
left the Lakes about a year ago, is inquired 
for by Frank McCormick, 191 Fourth street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. Important news. 

William Nilson, a native of Stavanger, Nor- 
way, last heard from at Buffalo, N. Y., in De- 
cember, 1907, is inquired for by his parents. 
Address, Nils Nilson, Nedre Blassenborg, No. 
9, Stavanger, Norway. 

John Urquhart is wanted by his sister, 
Ethel Urquhart, East Tawas, Mich. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts or last ad- 
dress will please communicate with her or 
W. H. Jenkins, Conneaut, O. 

Herbert Douglas, Lake Seamen's Union, 
No. 8400, is inquiring for his brother, John 
Douglas, who is supposed to have been seen 
recently in the Puget Sound country. He 
is 5 feet 8 inches in height, brown hair, blue 
eyes, fair complexion. Address Lake Sea- 
men's Union, 143 W. Madison street, Chicago. 

Members of the crew of the Olympia at 
the time of the accident to Charles Johnson, 
No. 4620, Lake Seamen's Union, while lying 
at the Lehigh Valley Coal Dock, in Su- 
perior, Wis., on August 23, 1907, are re- 
quested to send their addresses to the Head- 
quarters of the Lake Seamen's Union, Chi- 
cago, 111. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

ASHLAND, Wis 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada Box 235 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

SUB-AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 725 Quay Street 

ERIE, Pa 222 State Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT. MICH.. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 
Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Midi. 

Buffalo, M. Y. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Duluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

i', .ma Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

On. >i I '.ay. Wis. Sheboygan, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludington, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, 0. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A FREE-TRADE TRUST. 



An bananas arc on the free list, the fol- 
lowing comments of the Packer on the oper- 
ations of the free-trade trust ought to he in- 
teresting to revisionists. The Packer says : 

"From what can be learned at present, 
the banana trust is in for a searching in- 
vestigation, and those who, because of their 
past business connections, are in a position 
to know of the workings of this trust, say 
that if a clean, impartial inquiry is made 
the sensations which will be brought out 
will make the public sit up and think. 

"Several weeks ago the Packer published 
accounts of a suit which the McConnell 
Company of Mobile had brought against the 
trust to recover several million dollars dam- 
ages, and how this case was practically 
thrown out of court on a motion of the 
trust's lawyers because the alleged depreda- 
tions occurred outside of the jurisdiction of 
any court of this country. 

"None but the banana buyers of the 
United States and several former competi- 
tors of the trust who have made investiga- 
tions as to the methods the trust used in 
its fight can fully realize the iniquity of the 
workings of this organization. 

"Ever since the United Fruit Company 
and its Western distributing company, the 
Fruit Dispatch Company, have been organ- 
ized these methods have been employed. 
Down in lower Illinois about ten years ago 
the fruit company began its system of de- 
stroying outright sound bananas for the 
simple purpose to get them out of the mar- 
ket to keep up prices. At one time citizens 
of a small town on one of the smaller rivers 
of Illinois made a protest to the Governor, 
in which the proofs were presented that 
their entire section fairly reeked with infec- 
tious disease on account of the United Fruit 
Company dumping trainload after trainload 
of sound bananas into the river at that 
point. 

"The United Fruit Company holds a club 
over the heads of the jobbers of the United 
States. In some cities of the country the 
trust does not ask the jobber how much 
fruit he wants, but its representative goes 
to him and says that 'we are going ot sup- 
ply you with two cars of bananas a week,' 
or perhaps five cars a week, according to 
the representative's judgment of what the 
firm can handle. The dealer must take it 
or go out of business. 

"There have been no less than a dozen 
fairly well established banana importing 
concerns put out of business by the trust 
within the last five years. The octopus has 
started insurrections in the growing sections 
merely to destroy the property of its com- 
petitors, it is reported. 

"When the trust got out of the law suit 
which was begun in New York a few weeks 
ago it apparently was not through with its 
antagonist on this score. Several thousand 
dollars has been spent in collecting evidence 
against the United Fruit Company. In- 
quiries have been held among the growers, 
and the evidence is down in black and 
white. 

"The opening shot of a real investigation 
was fired by Senator Johnston of Alabama 
Tuesday. The banana buying public is very 
much interested and will await with pleasure 
the progress of the proposed inquiry." 



Demand the union label on all products. 



A SOURCE OF POWER. 



Said an engineer, who the other day 
looked long upon the graceful incoming and 
breaking of the rollers at a resort on the 
Atlantic: "Why can't it be done?" lie 
spoke in an aside as if to any chance hearer, 
but he was merely questioning himself. 
This man has for years kept in touch with 
the studies of others upon the subject of 
acquiring power from the ever-stirring 
oceans that they may be converted into 
useful forces for the turning of the wheels 
of daily life. Hut this man, with all his 
study of others' investigations and all his 
own original ideas, could convey no in- 
formation akin to the practical. lie was, 
like scores of other students of this mystery 
of a possibility, simply wondering, dreaming 
and speculating. Others have reduced their 
thoughts to ideas, and these to diagrams 
and plats, with an immense expenditure of 
written language, and then have merely 
stepped aside to await the coming of an 
oracle. Shall the basis of this gathering of 
power be in great edifices of stone or ce- 
ment and steel, with foundations imbedded 
beneath the surface of the seas within the 
shallows of their close proximity to shore, 
reaching high above all possible sweep of 
the waves, or shall they be upon floating 
platforms anchored to the bottom? From 
either of such points the power gathered 
could be transformed into electricity to be 
conveyed to the shore by wires and thence 
distributed. And shall the force of oscilla- 
tory waves to be thus garnered come from 
mere rush of waters to land and the reces- 
sion, or shall it come from the rising and 
falling of the platform of the structure? 
Shall the first great experiments be within 
the course or the regular daily ebbing and 
flowing of a great tide, where raging forces 
are to be found, as in the Bay of Fundy; 
and, if there, in the narrowest neck of this 
great churning of the waters, how can the 
power thus obtained be utilized? And will 
it pay men of great affairs to erect in some 
such place the tremendous plant that shall 
turn out the products that the world will 
demand when the Cape-to-Cairo steam line 
of vessel and rail shall be completed, and, 
with other great openings to commerce, 
shall add millions untold to the waiting list? 
— Cincinnati Enquirer. 



PANAMA AND CHILE. 



The two steamship companies with head- 
quarters at Valparaiso, the Pacific Steam 
Navigation Company and the South Ameri- 
can Steamship Company, arc contemplating 
the idea of a twelve-day service between 
Valparaiso and Panama. The plan is to 
send the Atlantic vessels of the Pacific 
Company, whose itinerary has been between 
British ports and Valparaiso, on to Callao, 
with a possible stop at Iquique. At Callao 
mails and passengers will be transferred to 
one of the regular west coast liners, which 
will call at Payta, Peru, and at Puna, the 
port for Guayaquil, only. This will avoid 
the delay incident upon calling at some 
twenty small ports on the coast of Chile 
and Peru. If there is no hitch in the pro- 
gramme, the new service will begin some 
time in September or October. 



Read the Journal's ad columns for fair 
products of all kinds. 



LABORS ECONOMIC PLATFORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and at not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. * 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S 
OF AMERICA. 



UNION 



tinued from Page 5.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 
SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAX FRANCISCO. Cal., 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER. B. C, Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts., 
P. O. Box 1335. 

TACOMA, Wash., 221S North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 334. 

PORTLAND, Or.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal.. 2l'7 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 

SAX PI , P. O. Box 2380. 

HONOLULU, II T., 821 Alakea St., P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE Wash.. Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box S75. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
sax FRANCISCO, Cal., r,i steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 
SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

Seattle; wash., p. o. pox 42. 

Branches: 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. Colman Pock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
l.A C< INNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Pox 84. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash.. I', n. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSI'KR. Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
L.ORING Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
>ACRAMEXTO. Cal., 200 M St. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



AMERICAN HOME MARKET. 



The boom in American exports is, in 
reality, an indirect demonstration of the 
fact that the home market is the best of all 
markets. We in this country often flatter 
ourselves that we are the greatest of trad- 
ing nations; but this is only true of over- 
seas trade. The total volume of our com- 
merce is small compared with that of the 
United States. Take manufactured goods, 
domestic and foreign, alone. The trade in 
them (including imports) in the United 
Kingdom amounts in value to £1,080,000,- 
000; in the United States it is £3,600,000,- 
000. The total volume of American com- 
merce of all kinds reaches the prodigious 
sum of £5,600,000,000, but only the hun- 
dreds of millions, or 10 per cent, represent 
imports and exports. The billions stand 
for the home trade. Forty years ago the 
United States was not a manufacturing 
country, but, thanks to a protective tariff, 
which insures a large and profitable market, 
the country's workshops now annually pro- 
duce goods valued at £3,500,000,000, the 
increase in the last ten years having been 
75 per cent. In other words, American 
manufacturing industries are four times as 
great as ours and nearly equal to those of 
the whole of Europe. But of this enormous 
manufacturing output only about £135,- 
000,000 worth, or 3.85 per cent, is exported. 
The home market absorbs the balance of 
£3,365,000,000 worth. The contrast be- 
tween these and the corresponding figures 
for the United Kingdom is startling. We 
export 33 per cent of our much smaller out- 
put, the home market being satisfied with 
£620,000,000 worth of domestic products. 
The American market is, therefore, actually 
nearly five and a half times as large as the 
British, or 2.75 larger on the basis of differ- 
ence in population. 

After making full allowance for the fact 
that the United States is still a "new" 
country in the process of development, and, 
further, that the price of commodities, like 
the rate of wages, is higher in America than 
in Great Britain, it is still obvious that the 
American home market is relatively much 
more valuable than the British. Moreover, 
we have seen that the former is rapidly in- 
creasing in value, while the latter is actually 
declining. That the domestic market must 
always be the chief reliance of the Ameri- 
can manufacturer is a generally recognized 
principle in the guidance of American in- 
dustry. Foreign trade is only surplus trade, 
for, although it is very important that 
America should have good foreign markets, 
this is chiefly because of the immensity of 
the output, and as a precaution against in- 
evitable periods of financial and industrial 
depression. — London Pall Mall Gazette. 



Vice-Consul-General Charles A. Risdorf, 
of Frankfort, reports that at the commence- 
ment of this year (1908) the number of pen- 
sioners in the official insurance of the Ger- 
man Empire for invalids, old age, and sick- 
ness amounted to 978,960, of which 841,992 
were invalid pensioners, 20,081 sick pension- 
ers, and 116,887 old-age pensioners. The 
sum paid to pensioners in 1907 is estimated 
at 172,000,000 marks, and since the existence 
of the institution at 1,328,000,000 marks. In 
1907 178,000,000 marks were paid in. The 
total assets amount to 1,398,000,000 marks. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



PROPAGATION OF SALMON. 



Last year was one of general disappoint- 
ment for the Pacific Coast salmon packers. 
In nearly every cannery district the pack 
decreased from 25 to 50 per cent in com- 
parison with the packs of the preceding sea- 
son. The cannery men were given a con- 
vincing demonstration of just the sort of a 
crisis they are facing, namely, the rapid de- 
pletion of the most important commercial 
species of salmon. As a compensating fea- 
ture, however, there is the fact that while 
probably 30,000,000 salmon were required 
for the poor pack the canneries did produce, 
yet in the spring of that same year over 500,- 
000,000 salmon were liberated in the vari- 
ous streams of the Coast by the combined 
efforts of the Government and private hatch- 
eries. 

Half a billion salmon fry may not sound 
large to the lay reader who knows of a re- 
cent slump in Wall-street stocks; but it 
sounds tremendous to the salmon packers, 
who know that if there had been one-tenth 
of that number of full-grown salmon avail- 
able for packing purposes during the 1907 
season the salmon pack would have been 
as large as ever. And, while perhaps it doesn't 
sound very large to speak of half a billion 
salmon fry, no larger than your little finger, 
yet let us suppose that one-half of these sal- 
mon reach the ocean and return to their 
various mother streams to spawn four years 
hence. It will mean 250,000,000 salmon, 
ranging in weight from the Royal Chinook, 
which sometimes tips the scales at fifty 
pounds, to the little humpback which aver- 
ages not over five pounds. But, to be con- 
servative in striking an average, let us con- 
sider the average weight of these salmon at 
ten pounds each. This means that four 
years from 1906, in 1910, there will return to 
the various rivers of the Pacific Coast, and 
be available almost entirely for packing 
purposes, 250,000,000 salmon weighing ten 
pounds each, or an aggregate bulk of sal- 
mon weighing 2,500,000,000 pounds — a sup- 
ply of fish sufficient to allow every man, 
woman and child in the United States dur- 
ing the following year a quota of over thirty 
pounds of salmon, or quite enough fish to 
feed the entire Nation for over a month, if 
no other food supplies were available. To 
transport this enormous supply of fish to 
market would require 50,000 box cars or a 
freight train over 400 miles long. — Daniel 
lv. Pratt in Outing. 



EMPLOYMENT FOR UNEMPLOYED. 



The English Socialist speakers told the 
House of Commons very frankly that every 
unemployed man had the right to work, even 
at the expense of the state, and that unem- 
ployment could only be solved by placing 
the means of production and distribution 
under state control. Mr. Maddison, a lead- 
ing trade-unionist Liberal, on the other 
hand, argued that the compulsory scheme 
of state employment would tend to depress 
wages and prove most damaging to the 
trade-union movement. Every unemployed 
man who was given work by the authorities 
in recognition of the "right to work" would 
tend to displace "free labor," and thus up- 
set the equilibrium established by trade- 
union forces. And Mr. Maddison argued 
that the "right to work" would involve State 
control over the working classes, and thus 



would individual liberty, and trade-union 
domination, be undermined. Mr. Maddison, 
from the trade-union viewpoint, was un- 
doubtedly logical. Socialism would be the 
death of present-day trade-unionism, and 
trade-unionism now has the instinct to fight 
measures which would tend to weaken its 
own control of the labor market. 

John Burns, who was himself hunting for 
work in 1886, and, as an unemployed agita- 
tor, laid the basis of his political career at 
the Trafalgar Square meetings and the 
"Bloody Sunday" demonstration, also took 
strong ground against the Socialist pro- 
posals. Mr. Burns' views may thus be sum- 
marized : "To meet the right to work, the 
local authorities would have to dot the 
country with farm colonies, which, in the 
case of Hollesley Bay and other experi- 
ments, have been found extremely costly. 
Such experiments competed with free labor ; 
and as for relief works, he appealed to the 
Trade-Union Congress in support of his 
view that they did more harm than good, 
and stereotyped the chaos and disorder 
which they were supposed to remove. He 
pictured the roads black with crowds of 
men who had thrown up less lucrative em- 
ployment in the country to take advantage 
of the right to work at a higher wage in the 
cities. And the lot of the poor in the cities 
would be rendered infinitely worse by this 
competition. The bill was a delusion and a 
snare which would greatly aggravate un- 
employment, for every man who was found 
work by the local authorities would tend to 
displace free labor." The view of Messrs. 
Burns and Maddison prevailed in the vote, 
although seventy-four members of the Lib- 
eral party joined the Socialists in the divi- 
sion. — Springfield (Mass.) Republican. 



P. AND O. LOSING TO JAPAN. 



With reference to the statement of the 
Peninsular and Oriental Company that prac- 
tically their whole trade between Bombay 
and Japan had been lost to the Japanese, it 
appears that the trade referred to is chiefly 
the transport of cotton. The Japanese pur- 
chase in the Bombay market usually 500,000 
to 700,000 bales of raw cotton every year 
for mills in Japan, and during the Russo- 
Japanese war this trade was entirely carried 
by the steamers of the Peninsular and 
Oriental Austrian Lloyd, and Florio Rubat- 
tino. Since the termination of the war the 
Japanese have been most anxious to carry 
the whole of this trade in their own vessels, 
and as they now own many more merchant 
steamers they have considered it wise to 
utilize this extra tonnage on the Bombay- 
Japanese line. The sailings of the Nippon 
Yuseu Kaisha have accordingly been in- 
creased from two to three sailings a 
month. They now therefore practically have 
the monopoly of the Bombay-Japan cotton 
trade. The Japanese also compete very 
keenly in the remaining, i. e., the Straits and 
China, trade. 



The British and African Steam Navigation 
Company (Limited), of London, England, 
has inaugurated a new fortnightly steamship 
service with Morocco. This new line of 
steamers will operate between London and 
Morocco poits via Canary Islands, carrying 
both passengers and freight. The first 
steamer of the new service, the Bakana, ar- 
rived at Tangier on June 17. 



12 



C< (AST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA, CAL. 



The schooner Carrie A. Norton, 
from Savannah for Kingston, has been 
towed into Kingston totally (IK 
masted during the recent gale. 

It is reported that at least three 

additional ocean liners will be eS 

tablished at Philadelphia, Pa., as 
as the piers for which plans 
been made are erected. 

The Allan liner Carthaginian, at 
Philadelphia, Pa., from Glasgow, re 
ported passing a medium sized i< e 
herg on September 26 in latitude 
48.56 north, longitude 4 ( >.1° west. 

The new lighthouse erected on the 
southern end of the Harbor of Rei 
uge, Delaware Breakwater, will soon 
be in operation as a guiding lighl for 
mariners seeking the entrance to Del 
aware 

Captain George W. Goodwin, ma- 
ter of the American clipper ship Dir 
igo, upon his arrival at Philadelphia, 
I '.i . ,,n ( (ctober 1 from 1 [onolulu, 
ended his 55th voyage around Cape 
1 1 , irn. 

For the first time in twelve j i 
not one of the 232 Government lights 
on the Ohio River between Pittsburg 
and Cincinnati was lighted on OctO 
her 1. I.ow water caused a complete 
cessation of navigation. 

Underwriters have awarded I 
tain Beavis and the other officers and 
engineers of the Philadelphia-Trans- 
atlantic liner East Point £500 in rec- 
ognition of their achievement in 
working the East Point into London, 
Eng., last year with a broken rudder. 
The Cunarder Umbria on arrival 
at Xew York from Liverpool on 
October 1. reported that on Sep 
her M) she sighted a small yacht. An 
investigation showed that the \ 
had been abandoned. The name of 
the yacht was Imogene, of Chatham. 
The United Fruit Company's liner 
Admiral Farragut, two days late 
from Port Antonio, arrived at Phila- 
delphia, Pa., on October <>. after hav- 
ing encountered a hurricane. Cap- 
tain O'Neill told how angry s eas, 
were calmed by the use of a few 
gallons of oil. 

The scheme, long under advise 
ment, for a direct steamship line be 
tween Norway. Sweden and Den- 
mark and the United State-, has been 
concluded successfully. The com 
pany has entered into an agreement 
with the German -team-hip compa 
nies whereby rate cutting will he 
avoided. 

Grave fear- are entertained 
twise vessels believed to have 
been caught in the recent hurricane 
which swept the Southern Coast. The 
Norwegian steamship Avalon arrived 
at Philadelphia. Pa., on Octoher 9. 
from Port \ntoiiio. ami reported that 
on the 3rd, in latitude 20.04 north, 
longitude 74.17 west, she passed a 
vessel's mast about 80 feet long. The 
same day another mast, with rigging 
attached, was passed. 

A message received at Mobile, 
Ala., "ii October 5. -tates that the 
Belgian steamer Tiflis at Port Arthur, 
Texas, report- picking up at sea a 
raft having on hoard Alexander 
Sjohlm, sole survivor of the crew of 
the American schooner Beulah Me 
Cahe, and one dead body. Sjohlm 
reported that the McCain- encoun- 
tered a hurricane and foundered, lie 
believed everything ami every soul on 
hoard went down with the exception 
of himself and the dead man. who 
later died from exhaustion. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

aptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
mywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
Bole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise l.ager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT I.OW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL I'.LDG. 

Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL, 




Foul Catarrh 

DEAFNESS, DYSPEPSIA, BLINDNESS, 
BAD BLOOD, DISEASE, DEATH, FOL- 
LOW THE RAVAGES OF FOUL 
CATARRH. 

Upon request we will send an abso- 
lutely free treatment which we know 
will immediately benefit any catarrh suf- 
ferer, no matter how long standing the 
disease may be. Not a patent nostrum, 
but a scientific remedy, put up from a 
specialist's prescription and guaranteed 
to be absolutely free from cocaine, mor- 
phine, chloroform or opiates of any kind. 
It's use is positively safe. If you want a 

Free Treatment 

all you need do is send your name and 
address at once to E. L. Baldwin, Phar., 
20-S Market st., San Francisco. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
i '.fiits' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnside 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



SMOKE, 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, - Eureka, Cal. 



SCANDI A HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE "ALOHA" 

Harry Klemme, Proprietor. 

I lass Rooms at very moderate 
rates. Summer garden attached. 

Cor. Queen and Richard Streets, 
HONOLULU, H. T. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D St*., Eureka, Cal. 
A. K. A-BRAHAMSBN, Prop. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET. COR. F, 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Jack Kittilscn is inquired for by 
Chas. Johnson, South Island, George- 
town Co., S. C. 



Halvor Eugen Krogstad, a native 
Christiania, Norway, is inquired for 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific is 
inquired for by his father. Address, 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Wilhelm Schumacher, a native of 
Duisbtirg-Ruhrort, Germany, is in 
quired for by the German Consul, 51 
Third street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Port- 
land, Or. 

Nils Nilson, a native of Stavanger, 
Norway, last heard of at Buffalo, N. 
Y., four years ago, is inquired for 
by his parents. Address, Nils Nilson, 
Nedre Bloosenborg, No. 9, Stavan- 
ger, Norway. 

Carl Johan Olsen, a native of Chris- 
tiansund, Norway, once a member of 
the Pacific Coast Seamen's Union, is 
inquired for by his sister, Mrs. B. 
M. Thalberg, nee Olsen, 719 N. Maple- 
wood avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Anders or Andrew Olson, a native 
of Lomma, near Malmo, Sweden, aged 
about 40, joined the Sailors' Union in 
San Francisco about 1892, is inquired 
for by Nils P. Adamson, Keeper El- 
dred Rock Light Station, Via Juneau, 
Alaska. 

Carl Wilhelm Swensson, a native 
of Kalmar, Sweden, born September 
15, 1881, supposed to be sailing on 
the Pacific Coast, is inquired for by 
his sisters and parents. Address, 
Klacs Swensson, Sodra Langgatan 
No. 26, Kalmar, Sweden. 

The following seamen, members of 
the crew of the schooner Minnie E. 
Caine, at the time of her wreck in 
1902, are requested to report to the 
Secretary of the Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific: Wm. McLaughlin, Julius 
Franz, K. Gruncrt, J. Koglund, W. 
W'ickstrom, C. Christensen. 



Seattle, Wauh., Letter List. 



Letters at the Seattle Sailors' Union 
Office are advertised for three months 
only, and will be returned to the Post 
Office at the expiration of that period if 
not railed or sent for. 



Abrahanson, John 

A, 11,,, F. 

Allen, .r. \v. 
Alexis, if. 
Anderson, Alfred 
i ,-rri 
Andersen, Lars T. 
Anderson, Gustal P. 

• ii, V. 
Anderson, A. -1445 
Anderson, I'M. -1823 
Anderson, Hans 
Apps, P. 

ndrew 
Atkinson, Sam 
Bakke, C. 
Baer, K. 
Bertelsen, Alf. 
Bellington, M. 
Bee, Colin 

a a. Johan 

.list, 11. -1700 
Bowling, T. 
Brodin, Julius 
Bruhn, \V. -1430 
Brander, M. F. 
Buchtman, F. 

•en, ('in-. 
Calhoun, W. C. 

ii. K. G. 
i 'ails,,]). Ludvlg 

I, i', W. 

r, J. 
Christensen, O.-l 228 
Christiansen, Olaf 
i hristoffersen, Emil 
Christensen, Johan 

Martin 
Chisholm, Thomas 
Chndoleuv, Geo. 

Cltrlstin 
Clarkson, C 

\ . 
Cronin, Oscar 
I 'n 111, Sam 

Dale, 

Dinwoodle. J. 11. 
Dowllng, s. i',. 
E helman, Th. 
Edvards, I'M. -149 
Elwood, Alf. 
Rskelsen, N'. P. 
Farm, T. R. 
Fannin, P. 
Frank, B. -499 
Fjelsbad, C. 
Franzell, R. 
Founder, <;. 
Gad, Vincent 
\. C. 

m, C. 
Gilifson, Frank 
Grusdin, im. 
Gustafson, W. -700 
Hansen, Theo. 
Hackenson, H. 
I [altnes 

e, M. W. 
Hazel, W. 

<'. -12G3 
ii. A. M. 

Hermansen, F. 

r F, II -1665 

Hellison. ir 
Hlxon, J. W. 
Haigraard, T. S. 
Hulbberg, Ernest 
[saksen, Yerry 
Jack, r.-mi 
James, Kan 
Ji us,-]). Louis 
Jensen, A. -1650 

n. Axel 
Johanson, Olaf 
,,n. J. J. 
annesen, Johan- 
nes 

m, J. -983 
i Carle 
Karlson, A. Is-ak 
Kalnow, A. 
M. 



(Calming, Jacob 
Kirwan, M. L. 

Kii-st. Hans 
Kinnan. F. -493 
K lint berg, C. 

Carl 
Klingcnberg, John 
Knudson, 
Krane. Carl 

Lahbonon, F. 
Larson, F. -931 
Laurttson, i 
Carl 

l.imi. ii. B. 

Lindholm, C 
Lindstrom, K. J. 
Martins* n, T. 

,11. Alex. 
Mankovskl, W. 
Mars, I'. 

x. 

Mas, m. S. 

Maki, I. 
McClary, J. 
Mi i >aughlin, J. 
Mikkelsen. K. -1620 
Moller, Vlex. 

Morris, W. T. 
Molver, Oliver 
Molver, I II 
Morris, if. 

>n, Martin 
Mm henson, 1 1. 
v rdin, John 
Muhlhouser Adolf 
Nilson. Carl 
Nitschi, C. 
Nilsen, X. A. -S88 
Nilson, ' l 
Nielsen, a- 
Norholm, EC. B. 
Norris, Ed. 
Xvni.in. lloctor 
X\ berg, i Ii 
Olsen, O, -1062 

K. -563 

■i os.-ar 
Olafsen, M. 

Halver 
Julian 
• a. La is 
on, Hjalmar 
- 1 230 
r, it'is.,11. Richard 
l.t.i son, 1 1 ins 
Petersson, A. -'-'■', 
ppndville, x. 
Petterson, 5. \. 
Pi tteri i 
Pemberton, I >. 
I'f.-if. 
Pigarta, F. W. 

riiliair/.n. A. 

Pschunder, If. 
Tii rnhagen, L. 
Rauen, vv. 

His. Tlios. 
ad, 'i. 10. 

R, (l. 
lidt, Alf. 
Sebelin, VV. C. 
Smith, I'M. 
Soderland, Anton 
s> p. i. 'I'm., a ' ; - 1007 
Rvenson, Hans 
Soderlund, J. F. 
Steinberg i.nton 
Stuhr, if. M. 
Summerell, H. 
a homson, R >1 
Valenl 

Vagmhllli G. 
Wardehotf, Alf. 
Mad, n. 

n. J. 
Wlllodeen, R. 
William, Henry 

Williams, n J. 
W 

/.. be! <;. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

George Bourgevis is inquired for by 
Ed. M. Bourgevis, who has news 
which will require his atention. Ad- 
dress, 3104 West 99th street, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Ed. Larsen, also known as Edward 
Torkelsen, last heaid of in the bark 
Ilesper in 1893, is inquired for by hi' 
brother, Jonas. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Olaf Johanneson, a native of Sei- 
desfjord, Iceland, last heard of on the 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address S. J. Westdal, 51 
South street, New York City. 

Charles Johannes, a native of Ber- 
lin, Ontario, aged about 35, supposed 
to be on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Charles Porter, Fred Choate and 
Soren Sorensen, who were wrecked in 
t lie Maggie C. Russ, are requested to 
call upon Attorney H. W. Hutton, 
Pacific Building, San Francisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

SAILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Alexander & McBride 

403 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Clothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
Rubber Goods, Etc. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Isabel. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

' PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., of Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 

Graduate gf Trinity Nautical College. 

Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 

Si ssful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 

license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 

494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, - SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1715. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 
Oscar Sunersson, last heard of 
about four years ago when employed 
in a tug at San Francisco, is inquired 
for by his brother. Address, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



R. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



f>m M^yw »-|-^|-^ ^> See that this label (in light blue) 

^*fe[X/ltf \ 1^^ &"-"< I^f'^^appears on the box in which 



you are served. 



fstpTi88oJiS5^?S^^r?v 

Issued by Authority of tne Cigar Matters' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

2llrt €f l1if Urt. That the Clears contained inihk box rave been made by a FifSt-CbSS Workman 
1 MEHblrtOf THE OGAft MttERS 'IhTOXATIONAL UNION of Aiurica. an organization devoted to H» ad- 
vancement ol the MORAt.MAlERIAland INTEUECTUAl WIlfART Of THE OWT. Tnewtorewe leucwtaO 
these Cigars to all snx* ers throuQhout the world 

JJ Infringements upon Uus LabeJ mil be punubed according to law 



F4C 
>*' SIMILE 



$ UC tiLfcuUl. President, 
' CMfUtf. 




BY INSISTING UPON PURCHAS- 
ING UNION STAMP SHOES 

You help better shoernaking conditions. 
You get better shoes for the money. 
You help your own Labor Position. 
You abolish Child Labor. 

Do Not Be Misled by retailers who 
say: "This shoe does not bear the 
stamp, but is made under Union Condi- 
tions." 

This is false. No shoe is union-made 
unless it bears the Union Stamp. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




Amoy, China, lias been officially 
declared free from cholera, bubonic 
plague and like diseases. 

A Paris newspaper has offered a 
prize of $2400 for the first aeroplane 
to fly over Paris from the Champs 
Maris to Vincennes. 

The Cretan Parliament, met on 
October 12, and formally voted the 
unimi of the island with Greece. The 
Moslem delegates were not present. 

The news that an Italian fleet, 
composed of the best and newest war- 
ships built by Italy, will cross the At 
lantic was confirmed at Koine on 
< )ctober 2. 

The Kuping tael was established 
as the standard coin of the Chinese 
Empire. The Mexican dollar has 
been legalized pending the prepara- 
tion of the Kuping coins. 

The German steamers Pretoria and 
Nipponia collided in the fog off 
Scheveningen, on October 10. Thir- 
teen of the Nipponia's crew, includ- 
ing the master, were drowned. 

It is understood that the wireless 
telephone experiments conducted by 
Dr. Lee de Forest have fully satisfied 
the British Admiralty officials. The 
officials favor installing the system. 

It was announced in London that a 
popular edition of Queen Victoria's 
letters will be published by the Lon- 
don Times and the firm of John Mur- 
ray, marking the end of the two 
years' "book war." 

The Russian naval budget as sub- 
mitted to the Douma amounts to 
$44,067,500, an increase over last year 
of $616,000. The construction account 
is $8,155,000, of which $3,771,000 is 
for new construction. 

The faculty of the University of 
Moscow has issued an appeal to stu- 
dents asking them to refrain from 
indulging in strikes which might in- 
volve the loss of the dearly won 
autonomy of the universities of Rus- 
sia. 

The autumn session of the liritisli 
Parliament was opened on October 
12. The entire ten weeks of the 
sitting will be taken up with consider- 
ation of the Government measures, 
the most important of which is the 
Licensing bill. 

The Congo Independent State in an 
official document declares that tin- 
charges that King Leopold enriched 
himself in the Congo are untrue, and 
that I lis Majesty always was- disin- 
terested in carrying out the great and 
troublesome task of governing I In- 
state. 

Tin- Second International Congress 
for Popular Education, which was re 
cently in session at Paris, Prance, 
voted to establish a permanent head- 
quarters to facilitate the international 
furthering of the cause. These head 
quarters will he provisionally in 
Paris. 

The International Copyright Con- 
ference was opened at Berlin, Ger- 
many, on October 14. Foreign Sec- 
retary Von Sclioen welcomed the 
delegates on behalf of the Govern 
ment and the Spanish Embassador 
to Germany, M. de Barnabe, replied 
for I In- Congress. 

A leper was recently discharged 
from a station at Wellington, N. '/.., 
after treatment of eleven months. 
He was said to havi been cured by 
the Nastin system of injections 
cultures of leprosy bacillus, the (lis 
covery of Professor Deycke Passa 
and Reschad Bey, of the I mix-rial 
Medical School of Constantinople. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




San Francisco Letter List. 



The City Council of Chicago, [11., 
has passed an ordinance establishing a 
new holiday in that city — October 12, 
"Columbus Day." 

Colonel William F. Stewart, who 
has been in "exile" at the ungarri- 
soned posl at Fort Grant, A. T., has 
been retired from active service. 

The drought in Pennsylvania 
more severe than at any previous 
time. The Scranton water company 
has only a month's supply in sight. 

According to the registration at 
Ellis Island in September the num- 
ber of Jewish immigrants was 6225, 
2001 of them being men, 2433 women 
and 1791 children. 

Chicago Day, October 9, the an- 
nual anniversary of the great lire of 
1871, was fittingly celebrated by the 
formal opening of the new 
county building in that city. 

The Supreme Court of Washington, 
in a decision rendered on October 
13, has unanimously upheld the Di- 
rect-Primary law passed by the 
islature of that state in 1907. 

The Farmers and Traders' National 
Bank of La Grande, Or., failed to 
open its doors on October 12 and on 
doors a placard was posted, 
•ed Until the Bank Examiner ar- 
rives." 

The discovery of more than 500 
rifles in possession of negroes in the 
"black belt" of Chicago, 111., has 
caused the police to break up what 
they fear are preparations for a race 
war in that city. 

Judge Calvin LT. Gantenbein in the 
equity department of the State Cir- 
cuit Court at Portland, Or., October 
12 decided that the statute prohibit- 
ing the transacting of business on 
Sunday is unconstitutional. 

The Chicago (111.) Health Depart- 
ment, in a report issued on October 
11, states that the dust and soot in the 
atmosphere of Chicago, as shown by 
tests just taken, is three times as great 
as that in the atmosphere of London. 

The 3-cent passenger rate was re- 
blished on October 15 as a result 
of the decision of Judge Vandeventer 
-i. Paul, in the injunction suit 
brought by the trunk lines of Ar- 
kansas against the Railroad Commis- 
sion involving the 2 cent fare law. 

The United I 'ourt of Ap- 

peals lias decided that the United 
Stales Government may be sued and 
: infringing the patents 
of the Fried Krupp Company, oi 
sen, Germany, in the manufacture of 
Springfield rifles and other army ord- 
nance. 

Sir Thomas Shaughnessy and a 
party of directors of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway have accepted from 
the contractors the double-track 
wheat road 422 miles long running 
between Winnipeg, Man., and Fort 
William. It was built at a cost of 
^Hi.iiOO.OOO. 

Dr. Charles Franklin Rand, the 
first volunteer to enlist in the I 
army aft lenl Lincoln's call 

for troops, and the firs) ti i re- 

ceive from Congress a medal of hon- 
or for bravery on the field, died at 
Washington, l>. C, on October 14, 

aged 70 years. 

A new record in wireless telegraphy 
is claimed by the United Wireless 
Telegraph Company, which, from its 
station at San Francisco, established 
communication with the Island of 
Oahu, one of the Hawaiian group, on 
October 11. The distance is 2100 
miles. The operators at both ends 
could hear each other plainly and ex- 
changed several hundred words. 



I .. i cers a i Hi.- Ban Fi iilors' 

Office are advertised for three 

months only ainl will lie returned to the 

Post Office at the expiration of five 

9 i run dale of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
1'. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, Ban Francisco, to forward same 
to the pint of their destination. 



Aasen, Alfred 
AJksne, Aug. 
Andersen, -i-'-'.J 

,\n, his. -ii, -1171 

rsen, 1... 
Anderson, -1552 
Anderson, John 

m. -llns 
Anderson, 1.. H. 

-mi. -1391 
Andersson, -1481 
Asmussen, -1116 
Atkinson, S. 

Aaltonen, B. 
Abrahamsen, Chas. 

MS, D. J. 

Hanke, -1646 

Becker, Fred w. 
Behr, P. 

nds, G. 

as, Fred 
Bensen, -143 

ii, B. 

i. H. 
Benson, -1454 

Benson, John E. 
Bernert, Fred 
Barber, A. A. 
Baxter, W. 
Benson, Vietor 
Berg, Julius 

a. Edward 
Bjorklund, Erik 

•ell, Geo. 
Christensen, Wm. 
Christensen, ViKgo 
Christensen, -aos 

11, J. 

Carlstrom, Arvid 

risen, M. 
Chrlstophersen, Chris 

] 'allien, Hugo 
Hahlof, John 
Danberg, A. 

, n, Sigurd 
.is, Henry 
den Haan, C. 
. R. 

Saston, R. "W. 
Ekendahl, -565 
Eklund, Ellis 
Ellefsen, Andreas 

Engnian, Chas. 
Eriksen, -595 
Eriksen, Leonard 

Falk, John A. 
Fait. Knut 
Figvcd, Sigurd 
Findley, H. 

i lad, Bophus 
Gasman, (leo. A. 
( ionzalez, Juan 
Gere, A. 
Gillholm, Albin 
Govan, A. 
Grant, John 

Grawert, Johan 

nsen, A. B. 

Haak, R. 

i Cagbartsen, M. 

Hater, Fred 

Hall, W. F. 
Hammargrln, O. 

,1. .Mali us 
Hansen, Karl 

Hansen, -777 

Harris. John E. 

J. _ 

Hansen, -i 
Hansen, -1267 
Hansen, 1676 
Haraldsen, ' ' 

Isaacson, O. B. 

Jameson, Joe 
Janson, -177n 
Jarvle, W. 

Jensen, Jas. B. 

en, Niels E. 
Jensen, Jens P. 

Jensen, -1578 
Jensen, -1634 

.lohanseli. .loakim 

Johansen, Theo. 

en, A. F. 
Johanson, Elis R. 

-ii, Sigurd 
Johansen, C. L. 

en, Hjalmar 
Johansson, F. 
jaansen, -1555 
Jakobsen, -1841 
Jansson, -1117 
Jensen, Geo. i,. 
Johannesen, Johan 

Kaasik, A. 

'zer, Ferd 
Kalnis, Harry 
Kane, G. 
Kohne. Ernst 

in, Carl 
Klint, Herman 
Karlsen, Karl J. 
[Carlson, -1158 
Karl son, C. E. 
Karlsson, N. 
Karsberg, C. 
Kastberg, Karsten 

-762 
Karlgren, -644 

Laantl, Moses 
Lagerberg, Chas. 

eyer, ll. 
Landgn n, J. 
Lang, Chas. 
Larsen, Ludv. J. 
Larsen, Lars 
Larsen, -1290 

a, Louie 



Alvarez, K. Lopez 

Andersen, a. Emil 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Carl 
\nii. rsttu, I >■■< t 

son, C. 
Anderson. A. C. 

on, ll. A . 
Anderssen, -12U8 
Andreasen, M. 
Andersson, -1246 
Mil. -1331 
on. Gus 
Aske, John 
Atkinson, Samuel 
Axelsen, Axel 

e, Ruppert 

ngen, F. 

in, J. 
Boogren, Eric 

Niels 
Boss, L. A. 

it, Fred 
lh nun. John 
Burger, A. 
Burke, Bug 
Burmeister, T. F. 
Lurnett, Chas. C. 
Burns, Chas. E. 
Bregler, I 
Brown, 1142 
Bryde, Chi 
Burr, C. C. 
Christoffersen, Beige 
Christoffersen, -614 

ke, R., -1117 
Coadon, -481 
Corneliusen, Jens 

- ,i. Harold 
n, Henry 
Coakley, John 

1 Hken. ler. M. 
Dories, H. 
Howe, John 
Dryden, Wm. 
Dyrnes, Ludv. E. 
Duke, E. T. 
Dybsland, Paul T. 

Erickson, Mike 

Erickson, 

la il.son, Edmund 

Eriksson, -333 

EskUdsen, X. I". 

Evensen, Andrew 

Foss, Laurits L. 
Frosch, Wm. 

Friebel, Herman 
Frivold, John 
i. Gustav 

Gustafsson, G. B. 
Guillou, Joseph 
Guldberg. llandolf 
Gundersen, Johan . 
Gundersen, Tandrup 
Gunderson, Christ 
Gunn, Bert 
Gustafsson, J. E. 
Guzek, B. 

Haupt, Emil 
Hess, August 
Hill, G. 
nines, Jas. 
lljort, Knut 

maun. Aleck 
Hohman, n. 
Hoist, R. 
Holland, B. Seott 

K;il! i'. 
Hutchinson, Ed. 
Hendriksen, Adolf 
Hilarion, Chas. 
Hynes, Jas. J. 

Iversen, Iver 

Johannesen. Martin 
Johnsen, Edward 
Johnson, J. 1*. K. 
Johnson, -1877 
Johnson, -393 
Johnson, John K. 
Johnson, G. Edwin 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Chaa, 
Johnson, J. K. 
Jones, Magnus P. 
Jones, P. 
Jurgensen, H. 
Justersen, Peter 
Johansen, A. 
Johansen, E. R. 
sen, -1343 
Johanson, -1547 
Johnson, -1800 
Jonasen, J< 

Klemm, A. 
Klintberg, ("has. 
Knutsen, Knut 

n, J, 
Koso, Pet 
Krauschat, A. 
Ki istoffersen, Karl 
Kenny, G. 
Krisl l i. T. 

Kugam, Fred J. 
Karlsen, -388 
K.-lly, Thos. J. 
ii, Sigurd 

ink 
Kristiansen, Karl 

Larsen, -1842 
Lantz. Gustaf 
Larsen, -644 
Larsen, -1271 
Larsen, Knut C. 
Larsen, Einar A. 
Lausmann, John 
Laws, Harry 
Leahy, -925 



i ..-nil Tonny 

i .iO .-.I I'll. ,1 II 

Lewald, ll. 

i 'ntz 
Liljifalk, S. 

rg, John 

is. Karl 
Lindholm, El. A. 
Lindkvist, -1014 
Llndroos, Oscar 
Larsen, -1113 
i .arsen, - 1 
Larsen, - 1 

l.lT.il | 

Magnuson, Gust. 
Magnussen, Axel 
Makl, 

Martinson, A. 
ter 
McGuire, John 
Mackrodt, Jonny 

.Mails, n, c. It. 

sson, E. W. 
Marcus, Bernhard 
Marthinius, Olaf 
McCue, T. D. 
Mel. can, John 

Nelson, Charles 
Neumann, Aug. 
Nicolaysen, n. 
Nelson, -611 
Nelson, -935 
Nelson, -C63 
Nielsen, -985 
Nielsen, Sivert 

Nilsen, A. 

Dte, W. 
< ilsen, Chas. 
Olsen, A. H. 

8, Harry 

Ohlsson, Berthel 
E. -59 
Son 1 1 

i, Herman 
Pearson, John S. 
Pedersen, Louis 
ppderson, L. R. 
I in ival. Wm. 
Persson, Johan 
'has. 

Perss 

Petersen, Bertel 
Pettersen. Carl 

Rasmussen, -497 
Rice, Patrick B. 

Rlgnell, ('has. 
lot, Bert 
Hints, T. 
Roalsen, Fred E. 
Robett. John D. 

a II. 
Rej iioi.is, Gus 
i B. 
Ries, Willy 
Riley, J. W. 

hi. John 

Sanchez. Vincent 
Emil 

Sawberg, A. 

■■' lim.:i. lplienu. A. 

Schmidlen. -1987 
Schmidt, Fritz 
Schoeffler. Alft ■ 1 

i. l". 
Schulz, Ernst 
Schultz, Albert 
Schumacher, Wm. 
Schwartz, Mr. 
Scott, Ed. 
Segerlin, Carl E. 
Shifter, Chas. R. 
Sickler, Louis 
Si.i. Edward 
Sirniison. L. C. 
Sinyard, W. 
Siven. Viktor 
Pivertsen, Geo. 

Tamm, A. 
Teigland, Thomas 
Templeman, R. 
is, Frank 
'l hompson, Fred 
Thomson, Hans 

II. C. 
Thorell, Ch. 
Thorn, Arvid 

Hntermann, Frank 
Ursin, Kaspei 

Van Bchoor, John 

-1107 
Vejoda, Fr. 
Vlrak, M. 

Vla.-ovi.h, John 

Wahi, J. 
Wells, Geo. L. 
Wellure, -1064 
Winters. C. J. 
Wahlstrom, Alb. 

on, Arthur 

ott, Wm. 
rg, Oscar 

Young, R. 

/ii now. Otto 
/ass. John 



Llndskog, T. K. O. 
Lohne, Even 
Lundberg, K. J. 
Ludvlgsen, Arne 
Lundin, Fred 
Llndstrom, Anton 
Loenecke, -1321 

I, .r. 

Lucas, J. W. 
Lukman, Ewald 
Lund, -599 
Lunde, Olaus M. 
Lundin, Chas. 



Melam 

Meyers, H.-rman 

Moller. Jens 

i. Andrew 
Mortimer, Ernst 
Murphy. Howard 
Marhoffer, Geo. 
Mi - 1 hins. ii. Markus 
Maythum, Hans. 
Mattsson, A. M. 
Mayer, Otto 
Melin, Final' 

Mikkelsen, John 

Nllsen, Carl J. 
Nilsen, Hans 
Nilsen, -784 
Nilson, Olaus 
Nilsson, Nat 
Norton, Jack R. 
Neman. Gus 
Noack, ll. 
Nordenberg, Johan 



Olson. -717 
Olsson. Wm. 
( i "•ssiiii. -94B 
. 199 
i Us. n, Ole 
i lis. ii. -1046 

...i.i. s, ir. 



Pettersen, Jens O. 
Peterson, John 
Poison, Carl 
Pratt, Fred 
Pratt. Louis 
Pedersi n, 
Pettersen, -1029 
t, Richard 



Rlgnell, Brie 
Reininghous, E. 

Roosan, i isi-.-u- 

Rolf, ll.illllell 

Rorhus, Karl 
Roscheck, Paul 
Rose, W. n. 

lsak 
Ruthberg, Bdw. 

Ruusik. M. 



Sjogren, K. A. 
Skol. 1. C. A. 
Skvskan, M. 
Smith. John A. W. 

trup, B. 
Sola. Emanuel 
Stone. Robert 
linen, O. 
Sundman, Gus. 
Swanson, Hugo 
Swensen. Carl 
Skeris, Mans 

en, James 
Stander, Arthur 
Stein, Guido 
Stenberg, Ait". 
Steenson. Andreas 

lohn 
Stiemert, Otto 
Sundholm. -1570 
Sundby, Emil 
Svensen, Anker 
Swanson, E. 

Tillmann, C 
Tjellman, Jonas 
Tjulander, O. 

Tollefson. Andreas 
Torgensen, Peter 

'i'ornkvist. M. 

He, Louie 
Tyson, Win. W. 



I'lstad, Kristian 
Ursin, Johan 

Von den Steene, J. 
von Vlllemayor, W. 
Vuclc, v. 
Velllnga, Louis 
Vldeberg, Oscar 

Williamson, A. 
Wlnkel, Aug. 
Winter, Got 
\\ ii ter, Johan 
Wirosky, M. 
Woker, Geo. 

Wol. I, II, 

Wolter, J. 



Zebe. Gustav 
Zimmerman, F. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
Of the Pacific. 

Andersen, A. C.-1108 Carnaghan, Wm. 
Johnson, Chas. Swensen, B. 

Pt . Townsend Letter List. 

Andersen, Hjalmar Kaivonen, Lais 
Asker, S. J. Le Fort, Guervis 

Hoffman, Tom Moberg, Alf. 

Henriksson, G. H. Williams, Chas. 
Jensen, Ingwald M. Wilson, Herman 

Honolulu, H. T. Letter List. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Allen, Fred 

a, Carl -1537 

Anderson, Albert B. 

-1568 
Anderson, Martin 

-38 
Halliard, C. 
Benson, Fred 
Blumer, Mase 
Brooker, F. 
Carlson, Chas. 1087 
' 'nit in. Albert 
Eklund, Aug. 
Eliasen, Carl 

r, Georges 
Haltnes, Magnus 
Johanson, K. J 

-1396 



i. Carl -69 
Kelly, John 
Kloot. J. 
Kolp, Otto Louis 
Kruger, Gustav 
Lowe, John A. 
Mndsen. G. F. -1677 
M.I 'enough, Ed. 
McFarlane 
Molen, D. V. D. 
Nilson, Alf. 
Olsen, Martin 
Olsen, Carl -908 
Petersen, Chas. -472 
Lundquist, Walter 

W. 
Webber, John 
Wcilsen, Alfred 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Andersson, J. S. 

Aeckerle, E. 

Berghold, Herman 
. Wilhelm 
ilsen, Alfred 
Her, Vincent 
John 

Holmes, T. A. 

Hansen, Huns Cr. 

Hartman, Chas. 

Holmberg, O, B. 

Johnson, C. A. 

inesen, J. -1441 
FCnutson, a. 
Kreman, Martin K 
Ernest 



Karlsen, Adolf isnk 
Lewis, \v. 

Madsen, -1677 
Neuling, Albert 
Osol, Theo. K. 
i Hson. John 
Osvald, T. 
Petersen, Frank A. 
Rasmussen, Markus 
ussen, Erik J. 
ire 
Saar, Hans 
Todal, Maarten 
Tiksman, Chas. 
Teigland, T. 
Winche, August 
Yates, James 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Anderson, Olaf 
Anderson. S. 
Armmi, Walter 
Bastrom, C. 
Christensen, E. H. 
Gustafson, Edward 
1 lunther, Theo. 

m, Gustave 
Johnsen, J. -26 
Karlsson, E. 
Knudsen. Jacob E. 

i. M. 
Lorensen, O. C. 
Mieheli, Agagtina 



Mettemeljer, J. F. 
Moersmand, Gastan 
Niccolie, Sant. 
Nilsen, Ruder 
Nyland, s 
Oman, Vietor 
Planner, Fred 
Pateejanske. R. 
Shuels, Christ. 
Skutul, A. 
Simpson, Lewis C. 
Svensen. Olaf 
Teigland. Q. 
Thortensen, Peter 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



"ii, Nils. 

Anderson, Axel. 

son, -907 

Andersson, -1447 
Bertelsen, -U'.'3 
en, P. A. 

Carlson, Leo 



Morris. L. 
Markham, H, 
Mattson, w. 
Maibohm, H. 

Nilson. Karl 
Ollgreen. K. 
Olsen, E. -515 



Christensen, AndersPettersen, -1154 
Christensen, -ITS Petterson, 



on, K. E. 

Kinanuelsen, A. 

", E. 
Ellingsen, J. 
Foster, O. 
Hope, Ole 



Rytko, O. -716 
Raymond, L. 

s, E. 
Smith, J. C. 
Swenson, Ben 
Stender, A. 



Ilendri. ksen. H. R. Storviek, I. 



Hansen, Lars. 
Johannesen, M. E. 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, Nils 
Jalonen, J. 

en, A. B. 
Lau, G. 
Liliebeck, C. 
Lewis, J. M. 
Lunder, B. 
Le Goffic, W. 



Saar, II. 
Solberg, O. 
Simon, A. 
Utby, Carl 

-her, 10. 
Viereck, II. 
w estburn, T. 
Weekauf. H. 

r, E. 
Well. L. 
Westergren, Ch. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Gustaf Gilberg, a seaman, is in- 
quired for by his sister. Address, 
Mrs. James R. Sederquist, 9 Wash- 
ington Square, Lynn, Mass. 

Hans Faroldre, a native of Aale- 
sund, Norway, is inquired for by his 
parents. Any one knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. John B. 
Sother, Aalesund, Norway. 

Ernst Sawitza, aged 23, last heard 
of in 1905, at that time a member of 
the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
is inquired for by Theo. Sieger, 1247 
Cottage Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Dietrich Doerflein, a native of 
Nurnberg, Germany, is inquired for 
by the German Consulate, San Fran- 
cisco. 

David Rosenthal and David Selwin, 
natives of New Orleans, are inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



Andersen, F. C. 
Andersen, A. L. 
sen, Einar 
Clahsen, 11. 
Campbell, N. 



Ferraris, J. 
Holm, J. 

Janssen, H. -1555 
Helinor, Belin J. 
Thomas, J. W. 



MSSJ*™R0AD 



OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

5AN FRANCISCO NEW YORK PORTLAND 



DEMAND the BRAND 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

525 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,453,983.62 

Deposits, June 30, iy08 34,474,554.23 

Total Assets 37,055,263.31 

Remittances may be made by Draft, 
Post Office, or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 
o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 7 
o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock p. m. for receipt 
of deposits only. 

Officers. 

President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-Pres- 
ident, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William 
Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny; 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Good- 
fellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 
Board of Directors. 

N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte, 
Ign. Steinhart, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van 
Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and 
W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, 
between 21st and 22nd streets. For re- 
ceipt and payment of deposits only. 



THE HARRISON 

Newly furnished rooms. 

456 HARRISON ST., Corner First, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Hot and cold running water in 
every room; electric lighted and free 
baths. Terms $1.50 per week up. 



Hotel Santa Fe 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 
Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
?2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bell, and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 

HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, opposite 
Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. Baths, 
Reading Room. Office open all night. 
Best place near waterfront. Investigate. 



Badges, Banners, Regalia, Robes, 

Lapel Buttons 

Briefs, Constitutions and By-Laws, 

and Souvenirs, at 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO., 

391 Jessie St., San Francisco. 

Phone Kearny 1966 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 
133 Hartford St., S. P. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

42 MONTGOMERY ST., CORNER SUTTER ST. 

CAPITAL PAID IN, $1,500,000. 

A SAVINGS BANK. A COMMERCIAL BANK 

Interest paid on savings deposits. 

Drafts and letters of credit issued, payable in all parts of the 
world. 



Labor News. 



SOMETHING NEW 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE NICOTINE DESTROYER 

"ANTIDOTE," the Catalytic Pipe has Four 
Important Advantages which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTIDOTE" needs No Break- 
ing in. Every smoker knows the terrors 
of the first few smokes in an ordinary 
Pipe. The First Smoke in an "ANTI- 
DOTE" is as sweet as an ordinary 
Pipe sweetened by Long Usage. 

2. The "ANTIDOTE" can not 
burn out. The Catalytic lining pro- 
tects the briar. 

3. The "ANTIDOTE" is always 
Dry even with constant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scien 
tifically destroys the Nicotine, 
making it evaporate. A por- 
ous lining filled with Coal Tar 
Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 




placed in 
the bowl 
of a briar 
pipe, this is 
called the 
Catalyser; the 
smoke passing 
over the Cata- 
lyser produces 
Formol. This For- 
mol turns all the 
moisture and Nico- 
tine into steam, caus- 
ing it to pass off into 
the air and evaporate. 
AH "ANTIDOTE" Pipes 
are hand made, of the 
Best French Briar. 

KASSER BROS. 

Distributors 
19 MARKET STREET 
S. E. cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




TOM 
DILLON 



San Francisco's Leading 

Hatter 
MARKET ST., OPP. CALL BLDG 

$2.50 $3.50 $5.00 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

5 Stores in San Francisco: 

64 MARKET ST. 

1458 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 

1600 FILLMORE ST. 

2640 MISSION ST. 

ALL UNION HATS 



DRUGS 

Clean Your Blood With 

THOMPSON'S BLOOD SPECIFIC 

Use Curative Skin Soap for 

Pimples. Price, 25c. 

CITY FRONT DRUG STORE 

10 MISSION ST., S. F. 

BXPRESSIINO 

done by 

E. BENELEIT. 

Stand at 

East and Howard Sts. 

Tel. James 411 San Francisco 



EXPRESSING DONE 

BY JORTALL BROS. 

Stand at 

44-46 Ea*t St., San Francisco 

Baggage Room at 109 Steuart St. 



WHEN YOU BUY YOUR UNION MADE CLOTHES 
BUY THEM FROM 

Capt. C. J. Swanson 



I have the best Gold Seal Oilskins and 
Rubber Boots made. Fine Woolen Un- 
derwear, California Blue Flannel Shirts. 

Suit Cases, Trunks and Valises. 

Also up-to-date Hats, Caps and Shoes, 
Officers and Petty Officers' Uniforms. 

Ready-made Suits and Suits made to 
Order from $12.00 and up. 

Umbrellas and Rubber Shoes. 

A large assortment of Pants, Bedding, 
Blankets and Pillows. 

All kinds of Overalls— in fact, if you 
are cranky about wearing apparel, I am 
there with the goods. 
SUITS CLEANED AND PRESSED. 




__ 



119 EAST ST. 

BET. WASHINGTON AND MERCHANT STS. 
San Francisco 



Japanese laborers employed on the 
Hawaiian sugar plantations are agi- 
tating for an increase in wages. 

More than half of the 15,000 opera- 
tives employed in sixty-seven shoe 
factories at Lynn, Mass., returned to 
work on October 16. 

The Philadelphia Central Labor 
Union, at its meeting on October 11, 
indorsed the policy of the American 
Federation of Labor in the political 
campaign. 

All of the coal mines in the Red 
Lodge (Mont.) district except the 
Bear Creek mines resumed operation 
on October 5. About 3000 men re- 
turned to work. 

The paper mills of the International 
Paper Company, at Franklin, N. H., 
started work on October 7 on full 
time, all the men having voted to ac- 
cept a 5 per cent cut-down. 

The Brotherhood of Engineers and 
Firemen has voted a pension of $100 
a month to Grand Master John J. 
Hannahan. Mr. Hannahan will retire 
from the office on January 1. 

President Roosevelt has approved 
the recommendation of the War and 
Navy Departments that the em- 
ployees of all navy yards and arse- 
nals throughout the country be paid 
weekly instead of semi-monthly. 

Patrick H. Morrissey, for years 
Grand Chief of the Brotherhood of 
Railway Trainmen, has been elected 
president of the Railway Employes 
and Investors' Association. The sal- 
ary attached to his new position is 
said to be $15,000. 

Two hundred workmen employed 
by the Pennsylvania State Board of 
Health on the western slope of the 
Allegheny Mountains have received 
binding orders to leave for their dif- 
ferent homes on the night of October 
24, to "work for Taft and Sherman." 
The Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany at Harrisburg, Pa., on October 
9 began the distribution of pay in 
cash for the first time in that city, 
abandoning the system of checks. 
The pay total is the largest of this 
year, fully $150,000 being carried for 
that immediate vicinity. 

A convention of mine workers from 
the anthracite districts of the United 
Mine Workers of America began at 
Scranton, Pa., on October 12 for the 
purpose of formulating demands to 
be presented to the coal operators 
shortly before the expiration of the 
present three-year contract. 

After a prolonged meeting, the 400 
employes of the St. Regis Paper 
Company, whose plant is located at 
Deferiet, N. Y., voted to continue 
work. An effort had been made to 
inaugurate a strike in the mill in sym- 
pathy with that now on in the Inter- 
national Paper Company's mills. 

Although immigration is steadily in- 
creasing over that of the year up to a 
few weeks ago, labor continues to 
leave the country in large numbers. 
According to the figures of the trans- 
atlantic conference the outbound 
steamships during one week recently 
carried 11,444 steerage passengers. 

The papermakers of the Berlin 
Mills Company, an independent con- 
cern, have decided not to strike, al- 
though asked to do so by President 
Carey, of the Papermakers' Union, 
on the ground that the Berlin mills 
were furnishing stock to the Interna- 
tional Paper Company, whose em- 
ployes are on strike. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Between "Fans." — Madge — "Was it 
a spectacular catch?" 

Mabel— "She ran to Europe for 
him." — Puck. 



Pie Plus Precaution.— "Are you fond 

of pie?" "Yes— but " "Why the 

hesitation?" "Don't tell my wife."— 
Nashville Banner. 



Too Premature. — Parson— "Dm yo' 

take (lis man fo' better or fo' worse?" 

Bride elect— "Lan' sakes, pahson, 

how kin ah tell so soon?"— The Circle. 



Teamwork.— "Are they society peo 
pie?" 

"Yes. He is trying to keep his 
position while she keeps theirs.*' — 
Puck. 



Awkward.— "Do you like moving 
pictun 

"Not a hit. I nearly always drop 
the blamed things on my toes." — Bir- 
mingham Age Herald. 



THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Affiliated with 

THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Chronicle Building. 
DEPOSITARY OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 

Authorized Capital (Combined) $800,000.00 

Capital and Surplus 385,000.00 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS: 

CHAS. NELSON, President HENRY WILSON 

LEWIS I. COWG1LL, Vice-President ALBERT SUTTON 

L. M. MacDONALD, Cashier C. S. WRIGHT 

J. C. ESCHEN W. H. LITTLE 

4% interest paid on Savings Deposits. 
Money transmitted to all parts of the world at lowest rates. 



YOU CANNOT BE AN 

UP-TO-DATE NAVIGATOR 

Unless you have an up-to-date teacher 
T 1 1 EJ 



United States Nautical College. 



CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD 



Principal 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



Mostly Tiresome.— "Are you fond 
of entertaining caller-':" 

"Yes," answered the lady addressed, 
'hut few of mine are of that variety." 
—Louisville Courier- Journal. 



Needed.— Mrs. Knicker — "There is 
lots of room for invention." 

Mrs. Bocker — "For instance, a shirt 
button that will stay on like a cam 
paign one."— New York Sun. 



Blind -Man's Buff.— "Look at my 
client." said the attorney for the de- 
fense. "Does he look like a hard- 
ened criminal?" 

"X... I can't say that he does," an- 
swered the witness; "hut that doesn't 
signify, for neither do you." — Chicago 
News. 



Blind'Man's Buff".— The Old Lady 
(as a group of small boys dash past 
her — "Ah, running races? Been read- 
ing about those Olympic games, no 
doubt?" 

A Voice — "Games be blowed! 
We've put a bad penny in a blind 
man's tin, an' he's after us." — The 
Sketch. 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



The oldest navigation school on the 
Pacific Coast (established 1875) offers you 
advantages that can not be obtained else- 
where. 

Our methods are short, thorough, con- 
eise and practical; the prices are moder- 
ate, and you are assured of a "square 
deal." 

HOTEL MOHAWK 

EAST STREET - - San Francisco 

Good accommodation for students. 



D. EDWARDS 

UNION STORE 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
HAMILTON BROWN'S UNION MADE SHOES, BUCKING- 
HAM & HECHT'S UNION MADE SHOES. 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

No. 4 MISSION ST., near East, SAN FRANCISCO 



Hand Tailored 
Union Made 

Suits \ $12.50 
Overcoats to 
Raincoats ) $25.00 

Wallenstein & Frost 



824 Market St. 

Opposite 4th St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



LADY SHOPPERS 

Appreciating the fact that the retail 
shopping district is fast rehabilitating 
itself in the vicinity of Fourth and 
Market, we call your attention to our 
convenient banking location at 783 
Market, near Fourth. 

Checking and Savings accounts 
solicited. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

Open Saturday Evenings for the con- 
venience of Depositors, from 



J. C0NEN So CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS— Gold Seal Rub- 
ber Boots, California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. 
Boss of the Road Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 
Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

34 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 



tS5i Most Reliable Jewelry House IZ 
SORENSEIN CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1896 

RELIABLE JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

SPECTACLES FITTED, EYES EXAMINED FREE 

Main Store 715 MARKET ST., near Call Building. 

Branch Store, 2593 Mission St., near Twenty-second. 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for 2 Yeari 




S.N.WOOD&CO. 

Union Made Clothing 

We are Manufacturers and Sell Direct to You 

San Francisco and Oakland 



J0HNJ.BAGLEY&C0. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Manufacturers 

PIPE TOBACCOS 

Gold Shore 

Sun Cured 

Lime Kiln Club 

\ff y^>lj5Md6ilK»iIt»int)|ol ths^- ag „_. 

ITM^WDRflRS^gggfefelKTERNSTlONAL | UNION 
Xy fe^2P^&2w/J^sat| MADE 



The Most Thorough and the Best Equipped Nautical School in San Francisco 

VON Schoens 

Navigation School 



SEAMEN'S INSTITUTE 



242 Steuart St., near Folsom 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 
MISSION ST., 
SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Francisco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc.. Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Outfits 
a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



Taylor's Nautical School 

Established 1888 

510 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Largest and best equipped private Nautical School on the Continent of 
America. 

Henry Taylor (Attorney and Counsellor at Law), Lecturer in Naviga- 
tion and Maritime Law. 

WILLIAM B. PAGE, Class Instructor. t 



CHRISTENSEN'S 

School of 

NAVIGATION 

NO FAILURES 
Room 23, 82 Market St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Oiganization. 



VOL. XXII, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1908. 



Whole No. 1088. 



GOMPERS STATES THE ISSUE. 



Men of Labor, Lovers of Human Liberty: 

You are believers in the form of government 
described by the immortal Lincoln as govern- 
ment of the people, for the people and by the 
people. You would not be true Americans if 
you were not. This form of government — the 
democratic form — is a government by law and 
is the direct opposite of — the despotic form — 
which is government by discretion. Govern- 
ment by injunction is government by discretion, 
in other words despotic. You would not will- 
ingly assist in destroying our present form of 
government in the United States, and I therefore 
assume that you would have the issue in this 
campaign stated plainly and simply in order that 
you may do your duty. 

The facts are that the Judiciary, induced by 
corporations and trusts and protected by the 
Republican party, is, step by step, destroying 
government by law and substituting therefor a 
government by Judges, who determine what, in 
their opinion, is wrong; what, in their opinion, 
is evidence; who, in their opinion, is guilty, and 
what, in their opinion, the punishment shall be. 
It is sought to make of the judges irresponsible 
despots, and by controlling them using this des- 
potism in the interest of corporate power. 

In order to do this it was necessary to proceed 
secretively to prevent opposition becoming too 
strong; some strained "justification" for it had to 
be sought in the Constitution of the United 
States. The Constitution provides that judges 
shall have jurisdiction in law and equity, and 
by extending the jurisdiction of judges "sitting 
in equity" all safeguards erected to protect human 
liberty are swept aside. 

Instead of the accuser proving the guilt of the 
accused, the accused is compelled to show cause 
why he should not be punished. The absolute 
power, in specific instances, of a judge sitting 
in Chancery (which is the real name for equity) 
is gradually extended over the several fields of 
human activity, and a revolution is perfected. 
We then have despotic government by the 
Judiciary, in place of government of, for and by 
the people. 

This revolution has already progressed very 
far. It is depriving the workers of their rights 
as citizens, by forbidding the exercise of free- 
dom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of 
assembly and the right of petition, if, in the 
opinion of the judge, the exercise of these rights 
may work injury to the business of some corpo- 
ration or trust. It is applicable to the worker 
to-day and will inevitably be made applicable to 
the business man at a later period. 

The progress of this revolution must be 
stopped. 

We must return to government by law in all 
instances where the revolution has been success- 
ful. 

This virus and poison has not only attacked the 
Judicial branch of government, but has in sev- 
eral instances entered upon the legislative field, 
by making laws which may be enforced by equity 
process; that is, the judge is by law authorized 
to: 

Disregard all accepted rules of procedure and 
of evidence, to 

Dispense with jury trial and substitute instead 



of these safeguards of human liberty his own 
opinion of what is right. 

It was with these serious thoughts in fhind 
that Labor's representatives submitted to the 
party in power — the Republican party — in 1906 
Labor's Bill of Grievances, and respectfully 
urged that necessary legislation be enacted. 
Nothing was done. 

Injunction after injunction was issued, for- 
bidding men to assist each other, to give in- 
formation to each other, and to do in unison 
those things which it was the undisputed right 
of the individual to do for himself. 

In the meantime, the dispute between the Hat- 
ters' Union and Mr. Loewe, of Danbury, was in 
progress from one court to another, until it 
reached the United States Supreme Court, where 
it was decided that: 

Organizations of wo r king men and working 
women, for mutual aid and assistance, are com- 
binations in illegal restraint of trade under the 
so-called Sherman Anti-Trust law; 

That any one injured thereby may recover 
three-fold damages from the organizations, and 
if they have not the means, then from individual 
members thereof. Between this law, enforceable 
by equity process and the extension of the use 
of the writ of injunction, the individual freedom 
of the worker to combine with others for mutual 
aid and protection is swept away and his rights 
as a citizen disregarded and denied. 

For all these steadily growing, dangerous ten- 
dencies there is but one remedy — legislation by 
the people through their proper representatives. 
Again, we appealed to Congress, and again our 
answer was a distinct and emphatic "NO." 

We drafted and caused to be introduced in 
Congress specific bills to stay and remedy the 
evil, but to no purpose. 

Labor was not only given an emphatic "NO," 
but it was coupled with a statement by candidate 
for Vice-President, Mr. Sherman, accepted and 
approved by the majority of Congress, that his 
party fully understood what it was doing and 
accepted all responsibility both for what it did 
and what it did not do. 

It is no attack upon the judges to say that they 
are men with a fair average quality of human 
nature; that they are subject to the prejudices 
and passions of men. They can not divest them- 
selves of their humanity by putting on the ju- 
dicial ermine any more than can the king divest 
himself of his by putting on the crown. 

Despotic power under the ermine is as danger- 
ous as despotic power under the crown. To stay 
its progress some remedy must be had, and we 
therefore appealed to the Republican convention 
at Chicago and were given the same answer in 
still more insulting language if that were pos- 
sible. We asked for bread and they showed us 
a whip, and in order to be certain that the whip 
will be effectually used the Republican party 
dominated as its standard bearer, Mr. William H. 
Taft, the originator and specific champion of dis- 
cretionary government, that is, government by 
injunction. In passing I may say that his nomi- 
nation, under the circumstances, was logical. It 
would have been impossible for the party to find 
a more effective representative of its policy. 

Labor's representatives then went to the Dem- 
ocratic party. That party made Labor's con- 



tention its own. It pledged its candidates for 
every office to those remedies which Labor had 
already submitted to Congress. The standard 
bearer of the Democratic party, Mr. William J. 
Bryan, entered fully into the essence of this 
struggle and declared that the real issue in this 
campaign is: "Shall the people rule?" 

The Republican party and its candidate stand 
for upholding and further extending into our 
country a despotic government vested in the 
Judiciary. 

The Democratic party and its candidate stand 
for government by law vested in the people. 

As an American citizen, in view of these facts, 
I have no choice — I have only duty. Duty to 
preserve with my pen and ballot, that form of 
government, for the preservation of which, Lin- 
coln said: "Men died at Gettysburg." 

Human freedom and equality of all men be- 
fore the law is the result of the struggle of the 
ages, and our holiest inheritance. This we must 
regain; this we must extend, so that it shall be a 
living, character-making, conduct governing 
principle in American life. 

Labor has been and will be accused of partisan- 
ship, but in performing a solemn duty at this 
time in support of a political party Labor does 
not become partisan to a political party, but 
partisan to a principle. 

As the campaign progresses, accusations, mis- 
representations of all conceivable kind will come 
thick and fast. In answer to them all, I have but 
to say that men who have given a whole life's 
energy to the great cause of labor and who, in 
all the years gone by, have been found faithful, 
honest and sincere are not likely to change their 
character all of a sudden. If we were desirous 
of either office or other emoluments they could 
have been obtained with greater ease from the 
party in power. 

I have said before and now say again, that 
there is no political office in the gift of the 
American people, elective or appointive, that I 
would, under any circumstances, accept. Not 
that such offices could be lightly put aside by 
an American citizen, but that I believe I can do 
more for the ideas that I cherish and the work 
in which I am engaged, either as an official or as 
a member in the rank and file of the labor move- 
ment, and the threats of politicians to "burn 
brush fires" behind me wherever 1 may go; to 
"create rebellion" in the labor movement against 
me and bring about my defeat for the Presidency 
of the Federation, can have no influence upon 
my mind and can not alter my course. As work- 
ers and citizens wc have our franchise, as citizens 
we must use it, to protect and extend equality 
of all men before the law and secure individual 
liberty for all men. 

And now, fellow workers and friends of hu- 
man liberity, Labor calls upon you to be true 
to yourselves and to each other, to stand faith- 
fully by our friends and elect them, oppose and 
defeat our enemies, whether they be candidates, 
for President, for Congress or other offices,, 
whether executive, legislative or judicial. 
Sincerely and faithfully yours, 

SAMUEL GOMPERS, 
President American Federation of Labor. 

Washington, D. C, October 12, 1908. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TRIBUTE TO SAN FRANCISCO. 



A part of the speech made by Ambassador 
Whitelaw Reid at the dinner of the Luton 
(England) Chamber of Commerce recently 
was cabled to this country, but there was a 
portion devoted to describing the rehabili- 
tation of our city which has not yet been 
printed in this country. After describing 
the effects of the fire, Mr. Reid went on to 
say: 

"Well, twenty-two months had elapsed 
since that fatal morning. The first impres- 
sion, as I passed through the familiar 
streets, was that even then, in many quar- 
ters, they were just beginning to clear away 
the debris. At every turn were yawning 
cellars filled with twisted iron beams, in- 
extricably entangled with each other and 
with masses of fallen masonry. But beside 
them would be fine brick or stone struc- 
tures, already boiling with business, and 
others, at first glance, looking ready fot it, 
though little but exterior shell was finished. 
Then everywhere loomed against the blue, 
steel-like brilliancy of the California sky 
the skeletons of buildings, huge frameworks 
of iron posts and girders bolted together, 
ten and twelve stories high, with marvelous 
and splendid human monkeys at the top, 
swinging more iron beams into place and 
filling the upper air with the deafening 
clangor of hammered rivets and bolts. The 
pavements were blockaded with building 
materials; the streets were jammed with 
struggling trucks ; the very passengers in 
the tramways carried the tools of their trade 
and were covered with mortar. Everybody 
was in a rush. The town that had been 
growing feverishly enough through sixty 
years was being rebuilt in two. Ten thou- 
sand permanent buildings had either been 
completed or were well advanced in con- 
struction since the fire, at an outlay of about 
$100,000,000. One-third of the structures 
destroyed by the earthquake and fire had 
been replaced, and on a scale so much 
grander that the floor space in this third 
practically equals the whole floor space de- 
stroyed. 

"After this wholly inadequate description 
of the scene you will not need to be told that 
your sister Chamber of Commerce out there 
reports that the people are doing business 
again ! Sometimes they do it in shanties 
while their new palaces are being finished ; 
sometimes they do it on desks made of 
boards laid across the ends of cement bar- 
rels, in unfinished rooms wdiere the carpen- 
ters are hanging doors and the painters are 
working on the windows — happy if only the 
plasterers have been ejected. But one way 
or another they are doing business — doing 
it to such an extent that in the December 
after the fire the San Francisco bank clear- 
ings were $196,000,000— over $30,000,000 
more than in the December before the fire. 
Of course this amount was swelled by the 
insurance receipts, but a year later it had 
risen to $199,000,000. By September, 1907, 
the savings banks' deposits had grown to 
$157,000,000, and the deposits in State and 
National banks to $173,000,000 more. 

"There are many things in the history of 
this country of which an American is in- 
tensely proud. But I protest that among 
them all there has been nothing in the forty- 
odd years since the greatest civil war of 
modern times ended without the sacrifice of 
a single human life in punishment and since 



the victorious army of a million men and a 
depleted but still formidable defeated army 
melted alike into the peaceful community 
as quietly as an untimely sprinkling of snow 
on a spring morning — there has been noth- 
ing in all our history since those marvelous 
days of which we have more right to be 
proud than of San Francisco in her great 
calamity and San Francisco to-day." 



SUBSIDIES FOR GERMAN SHIPPING. 



The German Reichstag passed the first 
reading on May 1 of the bill granting an 
increase of $125,000 in the annual imperial 
subsidy to the North German Lloyd Steam- 
ship Company for the establishment of a 
statistics to show that the development of 
the new mail steamship lines had given very 
satisfactory results since 1886. The total 
tonnage on the East Asian and Australian 
protectorate of New Guinea, Japan and Aus- 
tralia. 

The Under Secretary of State quoted 
four-weekly service between the German 
lines of the North German Lloyd had risen 
from 83,447 in 1888 to 283,333 in 1906, the 
total value of the cargoes from 74,500,000 
marks (one mark equals 23.8 cents) to 
369,000,000 marks, exports of merchandise 
from 33,000,000 to 156,500,000 marks, and 
the number of passengers carried from 12,- 
223 to 35,948. The exports to China had 
increased in value from 24,200,000 marks in 
1889 to 63,100,000 marks in 1907; those to 
Japan from 18,500,000 marks to 102,000,000 
marks in the same time, and those to Aus- 
tralia from 21,000,000 marks to 67,100,000. 
The subsidizing of the company had thus, 
according to the Under Secretary of State, 
been highly advantageous to Germany. He 
said, however, that the lines from New 
Guinea, Australia and Japan could not be 
maintained without the increase in the sub- 
sidy. 

The Colonial Secretary asserted that the 
new 10 per cent ad valorem duties, which 
were to be introduced in German New 
Guinea next year, and prospective revenue 
of $25,000 from the phospate trade would 
more than suffice to cover the amount of the 
proposed subsidy. 

The Berlin correspondent of the London 
Times states that German cruisers period- 
ically call at Brisbane and other Aus- 
tralian ports, and it is calculated that if the 
North German Lloyd is authorized to ad- 
vertise itself in Australian waters during 
the next five years, German enterprise will 
legitimately reap its reward at the expense 
of British trade. Similar feelers, the corre- 
spondent says, are being extended in the 
direction of Canada. 



CANADIAN LABOR UNIONS. 



A report issued in London shows that by 
order of the British port sanitary authority, 
in accordance with a scheme for the ex- 
termination of the rat plague, 524,397 rats 
have been killed up to August 1 in the 
warehouses and vessels in the docks of 
London, nearly 6,000 having been killed in 
one month. 



The population of Kobe, Japan, has in- 
creased from 190,000 in 1898 to 360,000 in 
1908. The city's foreign trade now amounts 
to $165,000,000 gold per annum, or double 
that of ten years ago. The total tonnage 
entering and clearing at Kobe last year 
amounted to 31,414,000. 



Some of the labor organizations of the 
Dominion are closely allied to those of the 
United States, and while national or pro- 
vincial relationships do not enter into this 
matter, the by-laws and regulations and 
generally the local organization and pur- 
poses are on similar lines, i. e., the elevation 
and betterment of labor conditions in the 
Dominion. 

According to the figures of the Labor 
Department, the total number of labor or- 
ganizations formed in Canada during 1907 
was 232, and of organizations dissolved 58, 
being a net increase during the year of 174. 
Compared with the three preceding years, 
the returns show a marked increase in the 
activity of the organization. In 1906 the 
number of organizations formed was 154, 
and of organizations dissolved, 85, a gain of 
only 69. In 1905 there was a loss of two, 
the unions formed numbering 103, and un- 
ions dissolved, 105. There was an increase 
of 44 in the number of unions during 1904. 
The year 1902 alone, since records have been 
kept by the Department, was more active 
than the season just past in regard to the 
organization of workmen, the number of un- 
ions formed in that year being 275 and of 
unions dissolved 54, a net increase of 221. 
Of the organizations formed last year, 51 
were formed by railway employes, 43 by 
metal workers, and 41 in the building trades. 
Ninety-four organizations were formed in 
Ontario, 51 in Quebec, 28 in Alberta, and 
22 in British Columbia. 



NEW LIVINGSTONE CHANNEL. 



It is announced by Grant, Smith & Locker, 
contractors for construction of the second 
section of the new Livingstone Channel at the 
Limekiln Crossing, in the lower Detroit River, 
that the cofferdam which has been built to en- 
close the improvement is about completed and 
that the work of pumping the water from the 
section of the channel will begin about Octo- 
ber 1. 

The second section of the channel extends 
from abreast of Stony Island south 7,500 feet. 
The material to be removed is mainly lime- 
stone, bedrock, sand, gravel and boulders or 
loose stone. Four thousand feet of the sec- 
tion can be enclosed in a cofferdam and 
dredged by the dry method, and it was on a 
bid for this manner of digging that the con- 
tract went to Grant, Smith & Locker. 

The cofferdam which surrounds the 4,000 
feet of channel is divided into two compart- 
ments of equal size, and from each of these 
huge constructed basins the water will be 
pumped separately. 

The work on the second section began, ac- 
cording to contract, on November 1, 1907, 
and it is required that it be completed in 750 
good working days from that date. The con- 
tractors expect to finish the work well within 
the time limit. Grant, Smith & Locker were 
contractors for one section of the new West 
Neebish Channel, in the St. Mary's River, and 
constructed a large portion of the Chicago 
Drainage Canal. 



The Chinese are great smokers, but their 
native tobacco is comparatively high in 
price, the best Shantung variety costing $6 
per 100 pounds, while lower grades may be 
had for $4.50 to $4. 






Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 




On the Atlantic Coast. 

( Contributed by the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Unions. ) 




*^^* 













FISHING IN SCOTLAND. 



The total quantity of fish taken by the 
Scotch in 1907 (exclusive of shellfish), ac- 
cording to an official report, was 9,078,059 
hundredweight, of the gross value of $15,- 
425,525. These figures exceed the preced- 
ing year's totals by 20 per cent and 6 per 
cent, respectively, and are in each case the 
highest ever recorded in the history of Scot- 
tish fisheries. Toward the gross catch 
herring and other net-caught fish contrib- 
uted 70 per cent, trawled fish 23 per cent, 
and line fish 7 per cent, as compared with 
66, 25 and 9 per cent, respectively, in 1906. 
The average price obtained was $1.70 per 
hundredweight, as against $1.90 in 1906 and 
$1.64 in 1905. The value of shellfish caught 
was $351,381, a slight decrease as compared 
with the return for 1906. 

The herring catch amounted to 6,313,247 
hundredweight, of the value of $8,838,829, 
exceeding the year 1904, the previous record 
for quantity, by 880,753 hundredweight, and 
1906, the previous record for value, by 
$813,178. The quantity of cured herring ex- 
ported in 1907 was 1,881,835 barrels, or 339,- 
071 barrels more than in 1906, which had 
hitherto been the highest record. The 
greater part of the herring export goes to 
Germany and Russia. Next in importance 
to herring is the whitefish, which amounted 
last year to 2,696,943 hundredweight, of 
the gross value of $6,485,790. 

The number of persons employed in the 
fisheries and the various industries subsi- 
diary thereto was 94,773, about 2500 less 
than in 1906. Of these, 39,228 manned the 
fishing fleet, comprising 10,365 vessels of an 
aggregate tonnage of 144,385 tons, and, 
with their fishing gear and equipment, of 
the value of $23,640,561. Of this fleet 
9262 were sailing vessels and 1103 steam- 
propelled. There was a decrease of 468 
in sailing vessels and an increase of 284 in 
steam vessels as compared with 1906. 



WIDOW DENIED DAMAGES. 



A seaman who had been ashore, in return- 
ing to his ship, lying in a British port, slipped 
off the gangway leading to the ship, fell into 
the water and died in consequence. His 
widow claimed compensation. The only evi- 
dence as to how the accident had happened 
was the following extract from the ship's log- 
book: "11 15, January 4, 1908. Thomas 
McDonald, donkeyman, whilst returning on 
board ship from the shore, more or less the 
worse for liquor, refused the aid of night 
watchman and policeman to assist him up the 
gangway, and on reaching the top step sud- 
denly overbalanced and fell over the gangway 
mainropes, dropping between the ship and 
quay, and striking the iron girder before 
reaching the water." 

In this state of things the County Court 
judge decided that a conclusion might be 
drawn from the entry equally consistent with 
an accident having occurred arising out of the 
man's employment or otherwise ; but that he 
was entitled to infer that the man was return- 
ing to the ship in pursuance of an obligation 
so to do, and that the accident had occurred 



SCOTCH VITAL STATISTICS. 



A leading publicist, basing his argument 
on German official statistics, has reached the 
conclusion that the German workingman is 
now in a position to spend from 10 to 12 
per cent more for necessities and pleasures 
than in 1895. He claims that a similar in- 
vestigation in the United States shows an 
advance of 8 per cent in the same period. 



by reason of a risk naturally incident to his 
occupation and therefore had arisen out of his 
employment. He therefore made an award in 
the widow's favor. The shipowners appealed. 
The Court of Appeal allowed the appeal. 
They held that there was nothing to show 
whether the man had gone ashore on the 
ship's business, or on a spee without leave ; 
that it was for the claimant to prove that the 
accident was one which arose out of and in 
the course of the employment ; that there could 
be no presumption in favor of the claimant ; 
that if the man had gone ashore without leave, 
or with leave for his own pleasure, the acci- 
dent could not be one which arose out of and 
in the course of the employment, and that as 
the claimant was unable to bring forward the 
necessary evidence she had not proved her 
right to compensation. — McDonald vs. Own- 
ers of Steamship Banana, Court of Appeal, ; 
July 31, 1908. 



HUDSON BAY PORT. 



According to statistics, the birth rate of 
Scotland has shown a steady annual decline 
for the past forty years. In reviewing the 
annual report of births, deaths, and mar- 
riages registered in Scotland during the year 
1907, the estimated population of Scotland 
is given as 4,776,063, of whom 2,331,907 
were male, and 2,444,156 female. This is 
49,993 more than the population of Scot- 
land in 1906, the increase of the males being 
estimated at 26,057, and that of females 
23,936. The estimated population of the 
principal town districts is 34,984 more than 
the previous year, that of the large town 
districts 6,606 more, and that of the small 
town districts 10,019 more ; but that of the 
mainland rural districts is 984 less, and that 
of the insular rural districts 632 less. 

In 1906 the birth rate was the lowest ever 
recorded in Scotland. The birth rate for 
1907 was even less, as the total number of 
births of living children registered in Scot- 
land during last year was 128,789, or 3,131 
fewer than the births registered in the pre- 
vious year, and 858 more than the average 
number of deaths registered during the pre- 
vious 5 years. The death rate of the year 
was 16.18 per thousand of the estimated 
population, a rate of 0.19 more than that of 
the previous year. 

The total marriages registered in Scotland 
during 1907 numbered 32,260, or 137 more 
than registered in the previous year, and 
1,170 more than the average annual number 
registered during the previous five years. 



Hans Jacobsen, formerly agent for the At- 
lantic Coast Marine Firemen's Union in New 
Orleans, has been appointed organizer for the 
International Seamen's Union of America in 
the port of New Orleans. 



The first move in the direction of estab- 
lishing a new outlet for western exports to 
the seaboard via the proposed Hudson Bay 
route is now being made by the Dominion 
Government. A survey party is being sent 
out by the Interior Department to lay out 
the town site of Fort Churchill, the future 
metropolis of Hudson Bay and the terminus 
of the proposed Hudson Bay Railway. The 
future city will be located on the eastern 
side of the river, opposite the ruins of old 
Fort Prince of Wales, and across the river 
from the Hudson Bay Company's trading 
post. Plans and drawings of the harbor 
are also being prepared under the direction 
of the department. 

The present population of Fort Churchill 
consists of four half-breed families, a 
mounted policeman, and one settler. The 
latter is the only man whose home is pitched 
on the future town site. He settled there 
with his wife before the area in question 
was reserved for settlement, and is there- 
fore entitled to claim a free quarter section 
of 160 acres of city real estate. 

It is expected that the Government meas- 
ure providing for the construction of a rail- 
way to Hudson Bay will be introduced in 
the House of Commons at Ottawa shortly. 



RIO'S "CHRISTMAS SHIP." 



The inhabitants of Rio Janeiro, down in 
Brazil, have eagerly anticipated the annual 
visits there of the "Christmas ship" from 
Boston, and even now are looking forward 
to the arrival of the four-masted schooner 
Margaret Thomas, which has already made 
four trips and is now in berth at Mystic 
wharf, taking on cargo for her fifth. 

The cargo will include ice, apples, pro- 
visions and Christmas goods, and will be 
landed at Rio before the season of good 
cheer arrives. Captain J. W. Balano, who 
will take the Margaret Thomas out, has 
already completed 16 round voyages, hav- 
ing had charge of the old Mabel Jordan 
prior to the Thomas. 



ATLANTIC COAST NOTES. 



Secretary-Treasurer Frazier, of the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union of America and Sec- 
retary of the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
recently attended the Massachusetts State 
Branch of the American Federation at Lowell, 
Mass., as a delegate from the Headquarters 
of the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union. The 
State Branch has always aided the seamen 
most efficiently when they needed help to re- 
peal the adverse laws on the statutes of Mas- 
sachusetts. 



Peter Jensen, who was formerly an agent 
for the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's 
Union in Mobile, has been appointed organ- 
izer for the International Seamen's Union 
of America in the port of Mobile. 



Chris Rhode, agent of the Firemen's Union 
at Boston, has resigned and gone to sea as 
oiler on the Savannah liner City of Memphis. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



Following the decision of the Vic- 
torian (Australia) High Court, the 
men employed in the harvester indus- 
try in that State have had their wages 
reduced. 

There was rioting at Turin, Italy, 
on October 17 on the part of the 
striking steel workers. Troops called 
out to restore order fired on the mob 
and killed three men. 

The Operative Bakers' Union at 
Perth. West Australia, has decided in 
favor of day baking, and in the fu- 
ture the work in the trade will start 
at 5 a. m. and terminate at 6 p. m. 

England is face to face with the 
most serious condition of unemploy- 
ment in her history, and unless relief 
is provided on an unprecedented 
scale during the coming winter bread 
riots may be expected in many of 
the principal cities. 

The following are the approximate 
numbers of unemployed reported in 
some of the principal cities of Great 
Britain in the middle of September: 
London, 200,000; Liverpool, 25,000; 
Glasgow, 20,000; Manchester, 11,000; 
Belfast, 10,000; Sheffield, 12,000; Sun- 
derland, 13,000. 

A deputation representing 10,000 
shop assistants waited on the Vic- 
torian (Australia) Minister for Labor 
recently, and asked him to amend the 
law so as to provide for a universal 
Saturday half-holiday. The minister 
expressed himself personally in favor 
of the request, on which they all sang 
"For He's a Jolly Good Fellow." 

A writer in the Lismore (Aus- 
tralia) Chronicle wants to know what 
objection the Doctors' Union, or the 
British Medical Association, has to 
registering under the banner of the 
Trades and Labor Council, ami 
whether it is not an organization 
which should be controlled by the In- 
dustrial Disputes Act? He refers to 
its boycott of the Lismore Hospital. 

During the three years 1904-5 to 
1906-7 628 employers in New Zealand, 
out of a membership of 3337, were 
fined £2110 for breaches of arbitra- 
tion awards. In the same period 176 
workers, from a union membership 
of 34,978, were fined £107, or to in- 
clude the Canterbury slaughtermen's 
strike, 443 workers, from a union 
membership of 34,978, were fined 
£1442. 

The Canterbury Conciliation Board 
of New Zealand has recommended 
that the hours of farm laborers and 
farm hands should not exceed eight, 
except at harvest time, when ten may 
be worked. The wages recommended 
are: Plowmen, 24s to 30s a week, 
with board and lodging; general farm 
hands, 24s and board; day laborers, 
6s 6d per day; casual laborers, Is 
per hour; harvest hands, £2 15s a 
week, or Is 3d an hour, with board; 
stackers, £3 per week, or Is 6d an 
hour, with board. 

A novel proposal for assisting the 
unemployed was considered by Min- 
isters in Melbourne, Australia, re- 
cently, at a meeting of the State Cabi- 
net. They were shown several fine 
•pearls, which had been discovered in 
a stream at Marden, between Leon- 
gatha and Mirboo North. The finder, 
who had submitted the pearls to the 
Government, suggested that unem- 
ployed should be sent to Mardan to 
spend their time looking for pearls in 
the stream. The ministers, however, 
thought it would be better to send 
down an officer of the Mines Depart- 
ment to inspect the locality before 
granting any assistance. 




Seamen's 



Institute 



242 STEUART STREET 
San Francisco 



— ^ vuocu 



UOCl\TE AKHfTt£T3 



Rooms $1.50 Weekly and up. 
Per Night, 25 cents. 

Baths, Baggage Room. 

Postoffice, Savings Bank. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing- Store 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

BELL BRAND COLLARS AND CUFFS— UNION MADE. 

We make a specialty of handling only the Best Union-Made Goods manu- 
factured for Seamen. 



LI PPM AN 


BROS. 


532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next 


to Fritz & Ernest 


SAN PEDRO CAL. 




COMPLETE SEAMEN'S 


OUTFITTERS 


Union Goods for Union 


Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M 



BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at 50 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
n retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
V1ARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



^G/STERt- 

him. Loos.- labels 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. S. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



JACOB OLSEN 

Keeps the Best Brands of 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Also a Large Assortment of 

STATIONERY AND NOTIONS. 

FRONT STREET, bet. 4th and 5th, Front 

' of Union Saloon, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. L. MUNSON 

Dealer In 
CIGARS, TOBACCOS AND NOTIONS 

GIVE THE OLD MAN A CALL. 

Front Street, Opposite S. P. Depot, 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



When making purchases from our ad- 
vertisers, always mention the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Terkel Olsen, a native of Treungen, 
Norway, aged 56, is inquired for by 
his brother. Address Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



CJHriBusrtit 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




IS 




San Pedro Letter List. 



Absolonsen, Ole M. Johnson, G. W. 
Agostlno, Falletti -1399 

Altliouse, Gustaf Jurgensen, EL 
Andersen, Emil Karadza, Gus. 

Andersen, Fred. J. Kelsen, Carls 
Andersen, Tom -538 Kesse, Teodor. 
Anderson, Chas. Kirst, Hans 

Anderson, Edwart Klaesson, Kar 
Anderson, Axel P. package. 
Anderson, Oscar Klausen, Karl 
Anderson, J. Klein, J. -378 

Andersson, Anders Kristensen, W. 

11. Kuhl, Herman 

Arnesen, Karl A. Lalne, A. 
Axelsson, C. B. Lane, Casper 

Backus, C. Lange, Friderlk 

Bade, Alexander Larsen, Magie 
Baily, Joe Larsen, F. -1113 

Barnhill, J. F. Larsen, C. L. -1202 

Barrach, Herman Lewis, T. M. 
Bauchwitz, Fritz Lieberman, -1157 
Bauer, Gosta Liebermann, George 

Behrens, G. -1157 

Behrsin, J. Lindall, George 

Benard, Sandallo Lindgren, A. -870 
Berggren, John Lindholm, A. 

Bergh, Borge Linman, A. W. 

Berntsen, Ole Logothetls, Pana- 

Bernhardren, C. gotis 

Bitter, Herman Lonnecke, Aug. -1321 

Bogdon, Wilhelm Luman, Alku 
Bolander, J. E. Lund, W. -1341 

Broback, Charles E. Lundstedt, Ch. 
Brose, R. Maack, Hans 

Brown, Joe Madson, James 

Brusbard, Ewalt Makl, Ivar 
Bush, P. Manley, Charlie 

Cappello, H. Martin, John B. 

Caratza, ConstantinMattson, H. J. 

A. McFarland, Dugald 

Carlson, August McKenzie, James 
Carson, August Mikkelson, C. 

Celley, Edward Murray, Joseph 

Chrlstensen, Christ Nestor, W. C. 
Christensen, W. 1179Nielsen, M. P. 
Chrstensen, J. -1164Nlelsen, W. -1000 
Christensen, Harry Nielsen, Gustave 
Chrlstensen, Gus, Nllsson, Johan 

-1054 Nilsen, H. 

Christiansen. -901 Nilsen, Carl P. -143 
Colombay, Louis Nilson, U. -877 
Dalesten, -1156 Nisson, Louis 

Ebapanen, W. Nodeland, George E. 

Ehnke, W. Nordblom, Ben 

Ekeland. Sigurd Nordin, M. 
Engebretsen, Mar-Norkamp, Richard 

kus Norman, L. 

Erickson, August Olsen, C. 

-571 Olsen, W. -753 

Ericksson, C. E. Orten, Sigurd 

Eskbom, Arvid Ostlin, Frank 

Falk, P. J. Pagel, Erwin 

Fettis, P. L. Pautanido, S.. rg. let 

Fjelds'tad. John Petersen, W. -1284 

Fryland, C. J. Peterson. Nicolous 

Geisler, Hans Pettersen, Alfred 

Goumas. C, r'g. let.Rau, R. K. 
Grantley, W. G. Reek, John 

(Package) Robeson, Michael 

Greveit, Joe Robinson, Alen 

Gustafson, A. K. -600Robsham, Jens W. 
Guthree, Raymond Rodriquez, Manuel 
Hammond, J. A. Rosan, Oscar 
Hansberg, J. B. Sardls, Vassilas 

Hansen, Alfred -1732 Savonius. B. 
Hansen, Haakon Scarabosio, Mario 
Hansen, Laurlts A.Schlosher, Ludwlg 
Hanson, Frank Schwartz, F. -1259 

Hanson. Jacob Sebellne, C. 

Havdn, A. E. Selin. Gustav F. 

Hedman, John N. Sillln, George 
Hickman, Fred Skand. C. Johansen 

Hilke, Carl Smith, J. S. 

Holmen, George Sorin, Krlstlan 
Holmgren, Joel Steen, Emil 

lngbretsen, -B68 Steen, I. -1999 

Ipsen. Edward S. Steen, Ed 
Jacobson, John -1341Svedstrup, E. 
Jamlesen, J. Svensson, Nikolans 

Janson, Chas. Swanson, G. 

Janson, F. -1911 Sylvian, Le Bloa 
Jensen R. -1754 Thompson, Frederick 
Tensen! J. H. -1311 Thoren, Gust 
Johannsen, Chris- Tuominen, Alfred 

tian Uggla, Alfred 

Johansen, C, -1593 Ulke. E. 
Johansen, Hans Wahlstedt, Rafael 

Johansson, Johan 880Wlckstrand, J. 
John, Robert Wiksten. Arvid 

Johndahl, Harry Wills. George 
Johnson, A. -1451 Woker, H. 
Jonasson, C. A. Young, Charles 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Simpson, better known as 
Jack Simpson, age 32, who has sailed 
out of New York on the Portland 
Line, is inquired for by his relatives, 
Mr. J. Childs, 208 McDougall street, 
Biooklyn, N. Y., or communicate with 
the Atlantic Coast Marine Firemen's 
Union, 15 Union street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The barkentine S. N. Castle was enrolled at 
the San Francisco Custom-house on October 20, 
with C. A. Lunn as master. 

Otto W. Olson was recorded at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on October 15, as master 
of the steamer Mariner, vice Joseph Santos. 

The last vessel of the salmon fleet to leave 
Alaskan waters this season is the ship Star of 
Russia, which is due to arrive at San Francisco 
within a few days. 

Traffic arrangements with a steamship concern 
for service between Portland and San Francisco 
in connection with J. J. Hill's North Bank road 
have practically been completed. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 21: Schooner 
George Washington, William Dower master; 
steamer Despatch, E. Kokeritz master. 

The ship Jupiter, which has been on the over- 
due list, quoted for reinsurance at 10 per cent, 
has arrived at her destination, Puget Sound, from 
Liverpool, after a passage of 185 days. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 19: Steamer 
Solano, W. Wright, master; steamer Prentiss, V. 
Iverson, master; steamer Aberdeen, J. J. Carey, 
master. 

The first heavy shipment of salmon to be made 
this year to Australia and New Zealand sailed 
from San Francisco on October 23 on the British 
steamer Yeddo, Captain Woodfield, of the Aus- 
tralian Mail Line. 

The following changes of masters were record- 
ed at the San Francisco Custom-house on Oc- 
tober 22: Steamer Taurus, Charles Zantz, vice 
L. J. Backman; steamer Lansing, C. Alberts, vice 
L. Curtis. 

The following changes of masters were record- 
ed in the San Francisco Custom-house on Oc- 
tober 21: Steamer Union, Gustav Schmidt, vice 
F. E. Bauer; steamer Arctic, John Bostram, vice 
George Hammer. 

The contract for the construction of two fire- 
boats, which are to be a part of the San Fran- 
cisco auxiliary fire protection system, was let on 
October 21 to the Risdon Iron Works, the bid 
of that company being $262,200. 

In a speech at Victoria, B. C, on October 21, 
Sir Thomas Shaughnessy announced that the 
steamers Empress of Ireland and Empress of 
Britain, now part of the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
road's Atlantic fleet, might shortly be expected 
at Victoria to take part in the Transpacific trade. 
Private interests capitalized in Copenhagen are 
to engage extensively in the salmon industry on 
the concessions procured by Denmark from Rus- 
sia on the southern coast of Siberia, according to 
O. E. Thielmann and H. Plaun, Danish million- 
aires, who arrived at San Francisco recently. 

The salmon packer Star of England, Captain 
Petersen, which arrived at San Francisco on Oc- 
tober 20, established a sailing record between the 
coast of Southeastern Alaska and San Francisco 
by negotiating the passage from Loring in ten 
days. 

The new steamer Carlos arrived at Tacoma, 
Wash., on October 24, from San Francisco for a 
part cargo of lumber. Her agents announced 
upon her arrival that she will be operated in con- 
junction with other steamers of the Fritch fleet 
on a new line between Tacoma and San Fran- 
cisco. 

While crossing out over the bar at Coos Bay 
on October 24, the steamer M. F. Plant, which 
plies between San Francisco and the North, met 
with some accident, and, according to advices, 
was lying outside. The steamer Eureka, which 
was passing out at the same time, stood by and 
rendered all the necessary assistance. 

The steam-schooner Temple E. Dorr arrived 
at San Francisco on October 24 from San Pedro 
in tow of the steamer W. H. Murphy. On her 
last trip from Grays Harbor to San Francisco the 
Temple E. Dorr lost two of her propeller blades, 
but she continued on down south without waiting 
to make repairs. 

In response to the requests of Japan, the Czar 
has pardoned the six sailors who were condemned 
to death at Nikolayevsk for attacking the prison 
guards. The men under sentence were sailors on 
the Japanese schooner Miyo Maru, which was 
captured by the Russians while seal poaching at 
the Commander Islands in Behring Sea. 

The following changes of masters were record- 
ed at the San Francisco Custom-house on Oc- 
tober 20: Steamer Sea Rover, Rasmus Rasmus- 
sen, vice C. C. Titchworth; steamer Sea Lark, 
George Pavesick, vice E. A. Saustrem; steamer 
Liberty, John Richardson, vice George Pavesich; 
steamer Union, G. Schmidt, vice F. E. Bauer. 

What is believed to be the beginning of one 
of the strongest shipping concerns in the Pacific 
was announced at Honolulu, T. H., on October 
10, to a meeting of shippers invited to hear Cap- 
tain William Matson, head of the Matson Navi- 
gation Company, present his plans for a new 
steamer and a new steamer service. 

The oil tank steamer Rosecrans, of the Asso- 



ciated Oil Company, has been equipped with a 
wireless apparatus and has had no difficulty in 
communicating with Monterey, Cal., and other 
near Coast points. At one time the name of the 
station at Honolulu was heard by the Rosecrans' 
operator, but his instruments were not powerful 
enough to reply. 

Completing one of the most successful seasons 
ever made by the United States revenue service 
guarding the Pribylov Islands against pelagic 
sealers, the United States revenue cutter McCul- 
loch arrived at Port Townsend, Wash., on Oc- 
tober 25, bringing from Unalaska Senior Captain 
F. M. Munger, who directed the operating of the 
patrol where shore headquarters were maintained. 
Suit to recover $45.50 in wages was brought 
under the admiralty rules in the United States 
District Court at San Francisco on October 21 by 
Mawgan Fremlin against the steamship Melville 
Dollar. He alleges that he was employed as a 
messman August 3, 1908, for a voyage from San 
Francisco to Guaymas and return, but that he 
was discharged without justifiable reason at Al- 
bion, Cal., nine days after. 

United States District Judge De Haven ren- 
dered an opinion at San Francisco on October 19 
in the admiralty suit of Notley Brothers, libel- 
ants, against the steam-schooner Gualala and the 
Gualala Steamship Company, confirming the re- 
port of Commissioner Brown which awarded 
$571.86 to the libelants for the loss of 115,950 
pounds to tan bark which was jettisoned from 
the Gualala in a storm off Fort Bragg August 
25, 1907. 

According to advices received at San Francisco 
on October 20 from London, the British bark 
Fifeshire is a total loss on Gilbert Island, in the 
South Seas. The crew were picked up by a 
passing steamer bound for Australia and have 
been landed at Sydney. The wreck occurred on 
August 21. The bark soon fell prey to the waves, 
which battered her on the coral reefs, and was 
deserted by the crew, which took to the island. 
The Fifeshire was built at Glasgow in 1885 and 
was of 1358 tons. 

Fares were advanced to $2 single, and $3.50 
return, on the Victoria-Seattle route by the 
Canadian Pacific Railway on their Princess liners 
on October 26, and beginning on the same date 
the fares on the Victoria-Vancouver route were 
reduced $2 single and $3.50 return. The previous 
rate on the Victoria-Seattle route was 25 cents 
single and 50 cents return, which has been in ef- 
fect since the rate war began last winter. No 
agreement has been entered into with the Inter- 
national Steamship Company, the competing line. 
Captain Wicklund, of the Point Adams (Or.) 
life-saving crew has returned to Astoria from 
Seattle, where he went to select a site for the life- 
saving station that the Navy Department will in- 
stall at the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition next 
year. The building and all its equipment will be 
so constructed that at the conclusion of the Ex- 
position it can be removed and permanently 
placed on one of the sites on the Coast where 
new life-saving stations are to be located by the 
Government. 

Judge Dole, at Honolulu, T. H., on October 15 
signed the decree of the United States District 
Court in the maritime libel of the cable ship Re- 
storer against the Pacific Mail steamship Man- 
churia for salvage in assisting to get the Man- 
churia afloat after she went on the reef at Wai- 
manalo on August 20, 1906. The decree awards 
$61,670.28 to the Restorer for the expenses she 
was at and for salvage, together with interest 
amounting to $966.52 accrued since the decision 
was rendered. 

On his way to Callao, Peru, to gather evidence 
regarding the pirating of the schooner Nuevre 
Tigre of Callao, and the alleged murder of the 
master and mate by J. Mortelmans, a Belgian, 
and T. Skerett, a boy, who sailed the schooner 
into the South Seas and lost her on a reef on 
Apampama lagoon in the Gilbert Islands, G. G. 
Alexander, Acting Attorney-General for Fiji, re- 
tained by the Government of the Western Pacific 
island, to prosecute the pirates, arrived at Vic- 
toria, B. C, recently. 

Following is the reinsurance list, as posted at 
San Francisco on October 23: Ship Toxteth, 235 
days from Port Talbot, 90 per cent; ship Acamas, 
182 days from Rotterdam for San Francisco, 10 
per cent; Bark Cadogan, 130 days from Penco 
for Queenstown, 25 per cent; ship Thornliebank, 
137 days -from Caleta Buena for Bilboa, 8 per 
cent; bark Criccieth Castle, 154 days from Barry 
for Mejillones, 40 per cent; bark crocodile, 125 
days from Barry for Talcahuano, 15 per cent; 
ship Hala, 134 days from Peru for Antwerp, 8 
per cent. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 1209 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Twelfth Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Phone Kearny 2218. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



ATLANTIC COAST MARINE FIREMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BROOKLYN, N. Y., 15 Union St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
NEW YORK HARBOR, 125 West St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., Church and Union Sts. 
MOBILE, Ala., 66 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, 85 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



CHICAGO,. 111. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
143 West Madison St 
Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 87 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 81 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 40 Ford St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
Agencies: 
7 Woodbridge St., East. 
1721 North Third St. 
515 East Second St. 
108 Third St. 
FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada, Box 235. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 

Sub-Agencies: 
MANITOWOC, Wis., 725 Quay St. 
ERIE, Pa., 222 State St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



DETROIT, Mich., 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 
ASHLAND, Wis., 
BAY CITY, Mich. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER-TEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 1185 River Ave., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 38 W. Randolph St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, Ohio, 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, Ohio, 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 401 Tower Ave. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, Ohio, 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio, 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency. 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAST SEAMEN'S 
-^ J O U R N A L_-^ — ^ 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY 

THE SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 

Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Fostoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1908. 



ALL SUMMED UP! 



licfore the next issue of the Journal ap- 
pears the Presidential election will have been 
held and the world will know the result. 
Whether or not the country will be "saved," 
will depend more upon the result of next Tues- 
day's election than upon any election in recent 
times, notwithstanding the transparent attempt 
of those who are endeavoring to destroy the 
country to make it appear that there is no 
issue at stake in the campaign, that the only 
question of interest to the people is one of per- 
sonal character as between Bryan and Taft. 

It is very easy to claim the election of this 
or that ticket, and just as difficult to forecast 
the result upon reliable grounds, upon any 
ground other than one's personal wishes. The 
Journal makes neither claim nor forecast. 
One thing, however, we feel safe in saying. 
Assuming that the people recognize the issue 
of the campaign (for there is an issue, and a 
very grave one), and assuming their loyalty 
to the principles upon which the Nation is 
founded, they will vote for that party and for 
those candidates who are soundest upon that 
issue and truest to these principles. These as- 
sumptions, we believe, may be safely made ; 
consequently, our process of reasoning leads us 
to the conclusion that the chances favor the 
election of William Jennings Bryan as Presi- 
dent of the United States and of a large num- 
ber of Democratic candidates for Congress, a 
number sufficient to place the Democratic party 
in control of the House of Representatives, 
thus re-establishing the character of that body 
as a truly representative, deliberative assembly. 

The campaign has been remarkable by rea- 
son of one feature, its leading feature, we may 
say. For the first time in the history of the 
country the labor movement has taken part in 
a political campaign in a more or less con- 
certed manner. In this the labor movement 
has been actuated by a public and patriotic, 
rather than by a class or partisan motive, by 
the motive of restoring to the people of all 
classes those fundamental, Constitutional 
rights which have been seriously endangered 
and in part destroyed under the misrule of 
the party now and for many years in control 



of the National Government. This, and this 
only, is the sum and substance of labor's par- 
ticipation in the campaign. The position of 
the labor movement has been misrepresented 
and lied about, its recognized exponents have 
been villified without stint, and every device 
known to politics or any other game has been 
resorted to by the enemies of labor and the 
opponents of free government, with the ob- 
ject of diverting public opinion and creating 
a false alarm. All the present signs indicate 
the failure of these methods and give promise 
of a mighty uprising on the part of the people 
in vindication of those cherished principles of 
government — those "inalienable rights" — to 
which the Nation owes its greatness and upon 
which the people must forever depend for 
their peace and happiness. 

This much may be said with certainty. The 
labor movement has fought the good fight as 
good men should. Under the leadership of 
Samuel Gompers, our "Grand Old Man," than 
whom no better citizen, no braver man, no 
mightier champion of humanity, exists on this 
planet, the organized workers have lifted their 
voices in unison and accord, appealing to their 
fellow-citizens in all walks of life to rally in 
defense of human liberty. That voice has been 
heard and heeded, and, unless we seriously 
miss our guess, its echo will resound from 
every quarter on November 3, announcing to 
the world that the blood of the Fathers still 
courses through the veins of the American 
people. Then shall the country be indeed 
"saved." The men of the labor movement 
may await the verdict of the people in that 
exaltation of spirit which elevates the patriot 
above every consideration of success or failure 
and which is engendered by a sense of noble 
duty nobly done. 



MAGUIRE A WINNER. 



As the campaign draws to a close the pros- 
pects continue to favor the election of Judge 
Maguire to the House of Representatives from 
the Fourth Congressional District of Califor- 
nia. The active and intelligent work done by 
the Judge's friends in every locality of the 
District has produced its natural effect in the 
creation of personal interest and enthusiastic 
co-operation among the voters generally. 
Judge Maguire himself has made a very active 
canvass, and with very good results due to 
those characteristics of mind and manner 
which have made for him a host of friends 
and admirers among those with whom he has 
come in personal contact. The distrust created 
in men's minds by the circulation of libels 
upon his character by self-interested opponents 
disappears immediately upon a moment's per- 
sonal acquaintance with the Judge. If it were 
possible for Judge Maguire to personally meet 
every voter in the District his election would 
be assured by an almost unanimous vote. As 
it is, the Judge will receive the votes of thou- 
sands who, while differing with him in politi- 
cal matters, recognize in him a man who may 
be depended upon to serve his constituents 
and the country at large with whole-souled de- 
votion and to place patriotism above party in 
any emergency. 

Among those most active in furthering the 
candidacy of Judge Maguire may be counted 
the voters on the water front of San Fran- 
cisco. The Water Front Maguire Club, com- 
posed in large part of members of the mari- 
time craft and those callings tributary to that 
craft, has left nothing undone to insure the 
Judge's election. In this the men of the 



water front are actuated by gratitude for the 
past services rendered by the candidate as well 
as by a keen appreciation of the Judge's ability 
to render like services in the future. Judge 
Maguire has many friends, but among these 
there are none more loyal, more ardent or 
more deeply interested in his election, for 
their own sakes as well as for the Judge's, 
than the men of the water front. 

In everything human there is, of course, an 
clement of chance. This observation applies 
with possibly more force in political affairs 
than in any other sphere of activity. While 
we have every confidence in the election of 
Judge Maguire, it remains to be said that 
should the result prove otherwise, that result 
will not be attributable to any lack of effort 
on the part of that class of voters who, by 
every consideration of loyalty to themselves 
and to their friends, are bound to support that 
candidate who has already, and in innumerable 
ways, demonstrated his willingness and ability 
to serve them well. 

These considerations apply in large degree 
to every voter in the district, as is doubtless 
generally recognized. Such being the situa- 
tion, there is every reason to believe that 
Judge Maguire will be elected by a handsome 
majority, in which event California will have 
among her representatives in the National 
halls of legislation at least one man of whom 
she may be justly proud, as of a man worthy 
the name of Californian and fully equal to the 
task of upholding the dignity and maintaining 
the rights of that State in any circumstances. 
a Representative in the truest sense of the 
word, a statesman respected and honored 
among the greatest in the land. 



The campaign of George A. Tracy for Rep- 
resentative in Congress from the Fifth Con- 
gressional District of California gives every 
promise of a successful outcome. Mr. Tracy 
is being enthusiastically received by the voters 
of the District, as much so among the agricul- 
tural population as among the voters in the 
cities. The latter, of course, feel a personal 
interest in Mr. Tracy's candidacy, by reason 
of his long association in the labor movement 
of San Francisco and vicinity. Brother Tracy 
should poll a rousing vote among the members 
of the labor movement in San Francisco, San 
Jose and other industrial centers. If labor be 
true to its interests, as these are involved in 
the present campaign, Mr. Tracy's election is 
assured. We see no reason to lay any stress 
on the "if" in this instance. On the contrary, 
we are confident that in Mr. Tracy's case, as 
in that of Judge Maguire, the "labor vote" 
will be "delivered" almost if not quite unani- 
mously in accordance with the policy of "stand 
faithfully by our friends and elect them ; op- 
pose our enemies and defeat them." In Rep- 
resentative Tracy the labor movement will feel 
that it has a defender who may be trusted to 
stand without hitching and to go without 
prodding. 



Every article has two prices, the price at 
which it is sold, and the price at which it is 
made. The first price is "marked in plain 
figures" on the article. The second price can 
only be conjectured. By demanding the union 
label the purchaser has the assurance that the 
price at which the article is made is not a "sac- 
rifice" one — that it does not betoken the sac- 
rifice of the health or morals of those em- 
ployed in the production of the article. 






Demand the union label on all products. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



While awaiting the election returns, it may 
not be amiss to say a word or two concerning 
the attitude throughout the campaign of those 
"prominent labor leaders" and others identi- 
fied with the labor movement who have either 
held aloof from or openly opposed the policy 
of the American Federation of Labor. What- 
ever the motives that have inspired these men 
— whether fear of "politics," favoritism to- 
ward the party of "Government by Injunc- 
tion," or actual hostility toward the Federa- 
tion — the effect, if any, has been the same, 
namely, to lessen the force of labor's appeal to 
the country. We can only wish for these 
brothers the fullest measure of the satisfaction 
that may be derived from the reflection that in 
a grave crisis affecting the welfare of the 
cause with which they are associated they fol- 
lowed the impulse of their personal fears, 
hates or ambitions, rather than the dictates of 
common duty to their fellowmen. 



With each accession of a "labor leader" to 
the ranks of the party of "Government by In- 
junction" it becomes more evident that the 
only "labor leaders" who are opposed to the 
policy of the American Federation of Labor 
are distinguished either by their opposition to 
the latter "on general principles," or by rela- 
tions of a personal nature with the party 
which they profess to be supporting on its 
merits. 



In accordance with the suggestion of Presi- 
dent Gompers, the San Francisco Labor Coun- 
cil will hold a special meeting on Sunday at 
2 p. m. for the purpose of saying the last 
word concerning the policy of the American 
Federation of Labor in the political campaign. 
All delegates should be in attendance promptly. 



The pro-Injunctionists may rest easy upon 
one head. That part of the labor vote that 
is "deliverable" will not be delivered to the 
Democrats, but to that party which owes its 
success in the past to the support it has re- 
ceived from those who are able to "deliver 
the goods." 



LETTER TO THE VOTERS. 



The following letter has been addressed by 
the Water Front Maguire Club to all the 
voters in the Fourth Congressional District of 
California: 

Water Front Maguire Club. 

San Francisco, Cal., October 26, 1908. 

Dear Sir : Inclosed herewith please find 
copy of letter issued by Samuel Gompers, 
President of the American Federation of 
Labor, calling attention to certain specific 
issues in the present political campaign. 

We also inclose a record of the public ca- 
reer of Hon. James G. Maguire, who is now 
a candidate for Member of the House of 
Representatives from the Fourth District, 
and beg of you to give to it the same earnest 
consideration that you are accustomed to 
give to matters of vital public interest. 

This Club is an organization of working- 
men, who are very largely living and work- 
ing along the water-front, and we feel that 
we can approach you freely from a wage- 
worker's point of view. The Club is not 
organized with a view of obtaining political 
positions or advantage for any one or more 
individuals. We expect to derive no benefit 
except such as must come to all citizens 
alike. 



One of the arguments for the election of 
Mr. Kahn and the Republican ticket is that 
if we shall fail to elect that ticket, employ- 
ers will cease to do business and bring about 
dire distress through lack of employment. 
This is an absurd argument. The employers 
have suffered severely, during the past year 
and a half, from the pending industrial de- 
pression and are eager to escape from it. 
Besides, we do not believe that the employ- 
ers as a whole are so unpatriotic as to un- 
dertake to punish themselves as well as the 
working people because the latter choose to 
exercise their franchise according" to the dic- 
tates of their own consciences. If, however, 
it be true that such is the purpose and that 
we are bound to vote as the corporations and 
the trusts dictate or starve, then republican 
form of government has ceased to exist, and 
it would be better for us all if no elections 
were held. It would be a mockery to pre- 
tend that we have the right to exercise our 
individual judgment as to the National poli- 
cies and who shall carry the same into ef- 
fect, if we are to surrender our manhood to 
such threats. The mere fact that such 
threats are being made should be sufficient 
to induce the voters to show their resent- 
ment by voting in direct opposition. 

But these are idle threats. There are at 
present about one million of workers unem- 
ployed in Germany, with a medium tariff 
protection ; over two million unemployed in 
Great Britain, a free trade country, and 
about three millions of men and women out 
of employment in this country where the 
workers are supposed to be "protected" by 
the tariff and with the Republican party in 
power in practically all the Northern States, 
and in all the branches of the Federal Gov- 
ernment. 

Hoping that you will give to this and the 
inclosed documents your careful considera- 
tion, we are, 

Very respectfully yours, 
Water Front Maguire Club, 
Andrew Furuseth, 
John H. Dolan, 
Patrick Flynn, 

Publicity Committee. 

P. S. — All voters are invited to visit the 
headquarters of the Club. 



Read the Journal's ad columns for fair 
products of all kinds. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Oct. 19, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary pro tem. 
143 West Madison St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 
OF THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters, Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1908. 
Situation unchanged; shipping very slow. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 
55 Main St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 20, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects good. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
l^A Lewis St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Headquarters, New York, N. Y., Oct. 20, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

H. P. GRIFFIN, Secretary. 
42 South St. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 26, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping dull. 

NOTICE: The election of the delegates to the 
New Orleans convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America will take place at the 
next regular meetings held at Headquarters and 
Branches on November 2. 

E. ELLISON, Secretary pro tem. 

44-46 East St. Phone Kearny 2228. 

Vancouver, B. C, Agency, Oct. 17, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

A. E. SIMMONDS, Agent. 
Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 19, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping improved 
a little; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 19, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 19, 1908. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

W. MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 19, 1908. 
Situation unchanged. 

WM. GOHL, Agent. 
P. O. Box 334. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Or., Agency, Oct. 19, 1908. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 18, 1908. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slightly im- 
proving. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 19, 1908. 

Shipping very dull; prospects poor. 

H. OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2380. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 12, 1908. 
Shipping still slack. 

JOSEPH T. LIDDY, Agent. 
821 Alakea St. P. O. Box 314. Tel. Main 95. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 22, 1908. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m., Ed. Anderson in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping very quiet. The Ship- 
wreck Benefit was order paid to one member of 
the steam-schooner Norwood. Voting on dele- 
gates to the convention of the I. S. U. of A. was 
proceeded with. The resignation of the San 
Pedro agent, Chas. M. Dawson, was accepted, and 
Frank Wilks elected to act as agent for the un- 
expired term. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 15, 1908. 
Shipping slack. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Phone Sun Main 2233. P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 15. 1908. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects pom, 

CHAS. M. DAWSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2155. 



DIED. 

Johannes Johanson, No. 761, a native of Fin- 
land, aged 44, died at San Francisco, Cal., on Oc- 
tober 21, 1908. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

( Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions. ) 



*s»s* 



FATE OF THE STRIKE-BREAKER. 



I read, some days ago, in one of the maga- 
zines, the story of a strike. A large mill 
had a dispute with its employes over a 
question of wages, and a strike was threat- 
ened. Thus the story opens : 

"John Jones was an old man. He had 
worked in this mill practically all his work- 
ing days, was married, and had eight chil- 
dren and a tired out, overworked wife to 
support. He still owed some on his home. 
He had no money saved and one of his 
children was sick. What should he do? 
The scanty wage he was then earning would 
allow him to provide the necessaries for his 
family, but no luxuries, of course. But to 
strike would cut the source of income, for 
his Union could not pay him as much to 
keep out as his master would to continue at 
work. He slept none that night. All the 
next day he worried. The next night he 
went to his Union. He asked them in a 
pitiful voice: "Will there be a strike? and 
must I come out also? My family need the 
money." 

He was told that they hoped to avert a 
strike, hoped the owners would see the fair- 
ness of their demands, but if not he would 
have to come with the rest. John went 
home again, and went supperless to bed, 
there to worry again all night. The next 
evening at six o'clock, as he passed from the 
mill a small card was slipped into his hand. 
Well he knew the meaning. A strike was 
ordered. John felt sick at heart. He went 
home, and the sight of his sick child and 
needly family nearly drove him frantic. An- 
other night of torturing doubt and he rose' 
in the morning, ate his scanty breakfast in 
silence, then asked his wife for his dinner 
pail. She, poor creature, had doubtless 
been through the same line of troubled 
thought as her husband, and, though she 
showed some surprise, said nothing. John 
took a roundabout way and slipped into the 
mill. He went to the superintendent, who 
received him warmly, promised John that 
he would be taken good care of. No need 
now for John to worry about food for the 
little ones, medicine for the sick. The 
superintendent would attend to all that, and 
so it went. A week passed. John was 
vaguely troubled, but felt safe. 

Then the strike was ended. The town 
was jubilant. A compromise had been ef- 
fected. The mill needed skilled men, men 
used to the work, so they settled. John 
was called before the good superintendent 
and was told that his services were no 
longer needed. "But," said John, "you 
promised to take care of me." "Yes, but 
we cannot let* one man stand in the way of 
so many," he was told ; "your Union will 
not have you, and we can do nothing for 
you." 

John took his seven days' pay and tot- 
tered out — to what? He had betrayed his 
comrades; he had done so for a price. Here 
was his pay. 

Now, comrades, this is not the only case. 
Read the following editorial taken from the 
Detroit Free Press of October 8, 1908— 
here is a sample of the wage of the strike- 



breaker and it is true. Here is food for 
thought. The editorial reads as follows : 

The way of the strike-breaker, in the matter 
of hardness, is to the way of the transgressor 
as the dirt road is to the granite sidewalk. 

When the machinists of the Canadian Pacific 
rail road walked out two months ago and left 
their shops almost paralyzed the company sent 
to England for men to take the vacant places. 
The immigrants were promised conditions that 
must have seemed to them like paradise, and 
many of the promises were kept — while the strike 
lasted. The Englishmen were well housed, fed 
at liberal tables, charged a low rate for board 
and lodging, and protected in every way from 
possible assaults by the former holders of their 
jobs. They had every reason to suppose that 
these pleasing conditions were to last their life- 
time. 

Now the strike is over, the railroad has won 
its victory and the old men want to go back to 
work. Twelve hours after the agreement to call 
off the strike, the railroad company announced 
to its late favorites that the rate of their board 
would be raised at once and that they must seek 
other quarters than those which had been pro- 
vided for their lodging. Naturally, the strike- 
breakers themselves turned into strikers quickly. 
But they merely made openings for the old work- 
ers by doing so. and found themselves out in the 
cold atmosphere of a strange country. 

In the railroad's case, the old men were trained 
to its uses. They knew the work the others must 
take months or years to learn, and were therefore 
more valuable to the corporation. So the mis- 
guided aliens are squeezed out, and their glow- 
inn dreams of the future are gone. The men 
they supplanted were never their friends, and the 
friendship of the railroad officials was never 
genuine. 

It's a ticklish experiment to come between a 
man and his job. 

Comrades there is a great big moral in 

this: Stick to your Unions! 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



Captain Gegoux, of the steamer Zenith 
City, is dead. In this item lies a story. 

The Lake Seamen's Union, in an effort to 
get to the sailors on the Lakes with the 
union side of the story, issued cards and 
pamphlets containing short sermons on un- 
ionism. Some of these were sent to me to 
Conneaut, for distribution. Emil Johnson, 
who runs a clothing, boot and shoe store, 
and who supplies many sailors with their 
outfits, willingly agreed to let me place 
some of our literature in his store, and in 
each package he wrapped for a sailor he 
would slip a card or a pamphlet from the 
union. This did not suit Captain Gegoux 
and he called on Mr. Johnson and ordered 
him to stop it. Mr. Johnson refused to do 
so. Then Mr. Chief of Police-Dock-Cap- 
tain-Councilman Long took a hand, and 
called on Mr. Johnson, who very promptly 
told Mr. Long that he did not want any but 
union trade. Now, union men, remember 
this story when you are buying goods in 
Conneaut, and show that you can be true 
to your friends. 

W. H. Jenkins. 
Conneaut, O. 



LAKE LEVELS ARE LOWER. 



Jno. Sweeney, a union (?) carpenter, be- 
longing to Cleveland, is scabbing against 
the Seamen's Union on the steamer Ger- 
man. This man paid his fare from Cleve- 
land to Milwaukee last spring to take the 
job scabbing against the seamen. 



Car ferry No. 2 and collier No. 1, trading 
out of Conneaut, are unfair. They refused 
to pay the October scale of wages, and are 
now running with scab crews. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Recessions were the rule for all Great 
Lake levels during the month of September. 
Records of the United States Lake Survey 
show that during the month Lake Superior 
fell 2 1-4 inches, Lakes Michigan and Hu- 
ron fell 5 1-4 inches, Lake Erie 5 inches, and 
Lake Ontario 9 3-4 inches. The large fall 
in all the lake levels is ascribed to the 
drouth of unusual persistence, rainfall being 
almost entirely lacking. 

The stages of the various Lakes for the 
month follow : 

Above tidewater, 
New York. 

Superior 602.79 

Michigan-Huron 581.26 

Erie 572.72 

Ontario 247.14 

During October, Lake Superior should 
fall 1 inch, Lakes Michigan and Huron 
2 3-4 inches, Lake Erie 3 1-2 inches, and 
Lake Ontario 4 inches. 

Lake Superior shows a height about 4 1-2 
inches lower than the average September 
stage of the past ten years, and about 4 1-2 
inches less than last year. It is 10 3-4 inch- 
es higher than in 1891, but 2 inches lower 
than in 1906, and lower by 5 3-4 inches than 
in 1903. 

Lakes Michigan and Huron show a stage 
4 inches above the average September stage 
of the past ten years, 1 3-4 inches lower than 
last year, but 18 1-4 inches higher than in 
1896. In 1885 the water was 23 3-4 inches 
higher. 

Lake Erie is slightly lower than in Sep- 
tember last year. It is 5 inches above the 
mean September stage of the past ten years, 
and 12 1-4 inches higher than in 1896. It 
is, however, 14 3-4 inches lower than in 1876, 
and 13 inches lower than 1885. 

Lake Ontario shows the highest Septem- 
ber stage since 1904, when it was 1 1-4 
inches higher. In 1861 it was 5 1-2 inches 
higher, and in 1862, 5 3-4 inches higher. It 
is 15 3-4 inches higher than the average 
September stage of the past ten years, 
37 3-4 inches higher than in 1895, 1 1-4 
inches lower than in 1886, and 24 1-2 inches 
higher than in 1901. 



Saginaw will make its debut as a regular 
Lake port with the opening of next season. 
Word has come of the completion of the 
task of dredging the Saginaw River above 
Bay City to a sufficient depth to accommo- 
date big boats, and now the single Pere 
Marquette bridge needs to be widened to 
accommodate the large side-wheel passen- 
ger steamers. That the Board of Commerce 
of Saginaw will see to the bridge widening 
during the winter has been pledged, and it 
was announced by General Manager 
Schantz, of the D. & C. line, that the steam- 
er State of New York will include Saginaw 
in her regular run next season. 



Ashtabula county voted out the saloons 
on October 3, and on November 3 all sa- 
loons in Ashtabula and Conneaut will be 
closed. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



LIGHTHOUSE KEEPER RETIRES. 



Captain Harrison Miller, for twenty-five 
years keeper of Point Betsey lighthouse at 
Franktfort, on Lake Michigan, has retired 
because of physical infirmities at the age 
of seventy. He goes, as do all the guardians 
of lonely lighthouses and life-saving sta- 
tions, without any hope of remuneration to 
keep him through his declining years. Cap- 
tain Miller does not retire willingly. He 
still believes himself capable of serving the 
beacon that has been the responsibility of 
his life. Not until the notice came that he 
had failed to pass the physical examination 
did he know that he had been shoved into 
Uncle Sam's discard. 

The Coast and Lake lighthouse and life- 
saving service is the only one on the roster 
of the United States Government that does 
not provide a pension as reward for long 
and faithful service. Marine men will tell 
you that the life-savers and custodians ot 
lonely beacon-posts are the greatest heroes 
of them all. 

A movement is on foot to secure for Cap- 
tain Miller two years' advance salary from 
the Government, but in the cases of other 
lightkeepers, retired after long service on 
the Lakes, such efforts have failed, and 
there is little hope for success for the Frank- 
fort captain. 



ACCIDENTS OF A WEEK. 



MILWAUKEE HARBOR ENTRANCE 



Milwaukee's harbor entrance will be wid- 
ened fifty feet within a year. Work will 
begin next spring and the job will be fin- 
ished before cold weather comes. It will 
be done by the Government with money 
remaining of the appropriation made for im- 
proving Milwaukee harbor. About $150,000 
remains of this fund, but not all of it will 
be required for the work. 

A new pier will be built south of the one 
which now forms the south boundary of the 
entrance. When it is completed the old pier 
will be removed with the exception of a 
small piece near the shore to lessen the un- 
dertow. 

The new pier will be of concrete. The 
superstructure of the pier will rest on con- 
crete caissons constructed according to an 
idea of Major Judson. 

The new pier will be 1,600 feet long, the 
same length as the two piers that now mark 
the entrance. It will be built at an angle to 
the other piers, making the distance between 
it and the nearer one greater at the shore 
than at the end. The distance between the 
extremity of the new pier and the wooden 
one which will be next to it will be fifty 
feet, and the distance from their shore ends 
will be about 150 feet. 



Coal receipts at Milwaukee for the month 
of September, as reported to the Collector 
of -the Port, were 414,358, of which 75,571 
tons were anthracite. In September last the 
total receipts were 513,501 tons, of which 
126,693 tons were hard coal. The reason 
for the comparatively light coal receipts in 
September this year is because in the earlier 
months of navigation coal receipts at that 
port were unusually heavy, filling up nearly 
all available docks. 



Here are accidents of the week : 

Str. Neshoto, Lake Superior, stranded. 

Str. Frontenac, Persian Island, stranded. 

Str. Thos. Lynch, Cedar Reef, stranded. 

Str. Amazon, Breakwater, Buffalo, strand- 
ed. 

Str. Ionic, North Point, stranded. 

Str. H. S. Halden, Bar Point, stranded. 

Str. Lyman C. Smith, Canadian Soo, col- 
lided with pier. 

Str. Panay, Bar Point, stranded. 

Str. Calumet, Stag Island, stranded. 

Barge Montezuma, Limekiln Crossing, 
collision. 

Schooner Ferry, North Port Point, ashore. 

Str. W. H. Gilbert, West Neebish, strand- 
ed. 

Barge Bell, West Neebish, stranded. 

Str. Jno. Duncan, Bar Point, stranded. 

Barge Baltic, Bar Point, collided with the 
Duncan. 

Str. Jos. S. Morrow, West Neebish, 
ashore. 

Str. Hall, Black River, ashore. 

Str. Edwin Ohl, Middle Neebish Dyke, 
stranded. 

Str. Briton, Amherstburg, stranded. 

Str. H A. Berwind, Conneaut, struck. 

Str. Sonora, Harbor Beach, ashore. 

Str. Peshtigo, Round Island, ashore. 

Barge Mowatt, Crab Island, ashore. 

Barge Jenness and steamer Zellah struck 
North Pier at Soo. 

Pretty fair outlook for wreckers. 



LOOK OUT FOR WRECK. 



MARINE ITEMS. 



The report of Customs Collector Honeck- 
er of Lorain, O., shows there was a gain in 
ore receipts at that port in September over 
August. Last month Lorain received 400,- 
960 tons of ore. The coal shipments fell off, 
there being but 267,000 tons shipped. 



The steamer Midland Prince recently ar- 
rived at Port Colbourne, Ont., with 315,000 
bushels of grain. This is the largest cargo 
ever brought to a Canadian port. The grain 
was transferred to smaller ships to be car- 
ried through the canals to Montreal. 



The new steamer Kinmount, of the Mon- 
treal Transportation Company, passed 
Kingston, Ont., recently on her way from 
Sydney, Cape Breton, with a cargo of rails 
for Port Arthur, to be used on one section 
of the Transcontinental railway. This is 
the maiden Lake voyage of the Kinmount, 
which recently arrived from Glasgow. She 
is in charge of Captain Alexander Milligan. 



Lakes Department Editor Jenkins takes 
off his hat to "Joshua Blunt." May he live 
long and prosper. 



The American Shipbuilding Company 
has awarded the contract for building a big 
drydock at the Buffalo plant to the Great 
Lakes Dredge & Dock Company. The new 
dock, which will take the place of two of 
the small docks now being operated by the 
Buffalo Drydock Company, will be 615 feet 
long and 110 feet wide. It will be com- 
pleted next July. The contract was signed 
at Chicago recently and work will be started 
at once. When the new plant is completed 
the Buffalo yard will be able to dock the 
largest vessels on the Lakes. 



The United States Lake Survey steamer 
Search, which is engaged in sweeping the 
south end of Lake Michigan, reports the 
discovery of a wreck lying in forty-two feet 
of water, six and three-eighths miles N. 70 
degrees 30 minutes E. (azimuth 70 degrees 
30 minutes) from South Chicago break- 
water lighthouse, and eight miles N. 21 de- 
grees 45 minutes E. (azimuth 21 degrees 45 
minutes) from the furnace stack of the In- 
land Steel Company, at Indiana Harbor. 

At the present high stage of Lake Michi- 
gan, there is not over twenty-two feet of 
water over the wreck, and at standard low 
water about eighteen and a half feet. As 
this wreck is eight miles out in the Lake 
and directly on the track of the heavy traf- 
fic for Chicago, Indiana Harbor and Gary, 
it is a dangerous menace. The wreck is be- 
lieved locally to be the hull of the five-masted 
schooner David Dows. 

About 800 feet to the southwest of the 
wreck a small sand shoal was discovered, 
showing twenty-four feet at low water 
stage. 

This might turn out to be the Chicora, for 
the location of which wreck a reward of 
$50,000 is offered, although it is hardly like- 
ly that she is down that far. 



The United States Steamboat Inspectors 
in the Cleveland district rule that the Con- 
neaut car ferries may carry Canadian crews ; 
may go with half a crew, provided the run 
is not over 13 hours in every 24 hours, and 
may carry passengers to pose as crew pro- 
vided there is a life-preserver for each per- 
son. In fact I failed to make a single point 
in all the charges preferred against those 
vessels. The word "navigate" in the law 
governing the manning of vessels is said to 
nullify the whole law, where the word 
"operate" would have won the case if it had 
been used instead of "navigate." 

I am sending a full report of the case to 
each union hall. Read it. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

143 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 87 Bridge Street 

Telephone 552. 

CLEVELAND, 81 Main Street (Old Number) 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO 54 Main Street 

Bell Phone East 756. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 
AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 8742. 

ASHLAND, Wis 515 East Second Street 

Ashland Phone 1563. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 North Third Street 

Telephone, Old Phone, 4428 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Third Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 40 Ford Street 

FT. WILLIAM, Ont., Canada Box 236 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

SUB-AGENCIES: 

MANITOWOC, Wis 726 Quay Street 

ERIE, Pa 222 State Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Local 233. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 1944 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITALS AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.. CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 

Ashland, Wis. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Marquette, Mich. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Puluth, Minn. Saginaw, Mich. 

Escanaba, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Green Bay, Wis. Sheboygan, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Ludington, Mich. Superior, Wis. 

Manistee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COST OF THE WHITE PLAGUE. 



According to Professor Irving Fisher of 
Vale, in a paper at the International Con- 
gress on Tuberculosis recently held in 
Washington, the "great white plague" costs 
in hard cash over $1,000,000,000 a year. 
There are several reasons why the cost is 
so frightful. In the first place, more people 
die of consumption than of anything else. 
Professor fisher estimates that consump- 
tion kills 138,000 every year in the United 
States. This is equal to the deaths from 
typhoid fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria, ap- 
pendicitis, meningitis, diabetes, smallpox and 
cancer all put together. Then, again, it gen- 
erally takes three years to die, during which 
time the poor victim can earn little or noth- 
ing. Finally, the scourge picks out its vic- 
tims when they are young men and young 
women, at the very time they are beginning 
to earn money. The cost of such items as 
doctors' bills, medicines, nursing and loss 
of earnings before death comes amounts to 
over $2400 in each case, while the earning 
power which "might have been" if death 
had not come brings the total cost to at least 
$8000. If this is multiplied by the 138,000 
deaths we find the cost is bigger than the 
almost incalculable sum of $1,000,000,000. 
Professor Fisher estimates that over half of 
this cost generally falls on the luckless vic- 
tim himself; but the cost is over $440,000,- 
000 a year to others than the consumptive. 
This enormous loss falls on the family and 
friends, or on charitable or public institu- 
tions. As a matter of self-defense it would 
be worth while to the community, Profes- 
sor Fisher shows, in order to save merely a 
quarter of the lives now lost by consump- 
tion, to invest $5,500,000,000. At present 
only a fraction of 1 per cent of this money 
is being used to fight the disease. 



RUSSIAN LABOR INSURANCE. 



United States Consul J. W. Ragsdale, St. 
Petersburg, advises that the Russian Douma 
has under consideration a bill requiring 
manufacturers to insure their laborers 
against accidents while employed in facto- 
ries and to provide for them in case of ill- 
ness. Upon this the Consul comments : 

The law of 1903 imposed this duty direct- 
ly on the employers, but under the new law 
an insurance by an organized insurance 
company will be provided. This substitu- 
tion will entail an increase of expense on 
the part of manufacturers against accidents 
of about 1 per cent of the salary of all the 
employes. As there are about 2,500,000 per- 
sons employed in manufactories, drawing 
an average of 220 rubles (ruble, 51.5 cents) 
each per annum, or a total of 550,000,000 
rubles, the assessment will be considerable. 

The bill further provides for insurance 
against illness, the premiums to be paid 
conjointly by the laborers and the employ- 
ers, the former paying from 1 to 3 per cent 
of their salaries and the latter two-thirds 
as much, which together will aggregate 
about 7,300,000 rubles. These assessments 
will vary somewhat, but are based upon the 
statistics of the past, which show the aver- 
age cost of treatment in case of illness to 
be about 4 rubles, or 2 per cent of the work- 
man's salary. The new measure, therefore, 
if it becomes a law, will entail on the manu- 
facturer an expense aggregating about 5,- 
000,000 rubles more than was required 
under the law of 1903. 



GREAT GERMAN ESTABLISHMENT. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATFORM. 



The Krupp outputs may be divided under 
two heads, viz. (1) War materials ; (2) prod- 
ucts of general industry. 

Under the head of war material come guns, 
turrets, armored shields, disappearing car- 
riages, hoisting and transporting machinery 
for ammunition and ordnance, ordnance 
wagons of all kinds, harnesses, observation 
appliances, ammunition, rifle barrels, and 
armor. 

Under products for general industry Krupp 
produces railway material, including wheels, 
tires, axles, springs, boiler plates, frame 
plates, press car frames, structural parts of 
locomotives, rails, switches, frogs, portal >le 
railroad plants, together with requisite roll- 
ing stock, ship-building material, machinery 
parts, sheet steel and sheet iron, rolls, tool 
steel, steel for motor-car building, hard 
steel for stone breakers, dredges, etc., and 
steel bars of special qualities. 

There is more gas used in lighting the 
Essen shops than is used by the entire city 
of Bremen. In the sixty odd departments 
there are more than 6500 machine tools in 
use. There are 155 steam hammers, twenty- 
one transmission hammers, seventy-four hy- 
draulic presses, two presses measuring 7000 
tons each (bending), one of 5000 and one of 
2000 tons, respectively, for forging purposes. 
There are over 300 stationary steam boilers, 
more than seventy locomotive steam boilers, 
about 540 steam engines, aggregating nearly 
60,000 horsepower, and considerably more 
than 700 cranes. During the year 1906 the 
combined Krupp works consumed 1,285,310 
tons of coal, of which quantity the Essen 
works used 813,155 tons. In addition, there 
was used coke and briquettes, which make, 
substituting for coke and briquettes their 
equivalents in coal, a total of 2,361,425 tons. 
The total yearly consumption of water 
nearly equals that of the city of Cologne, 
and the gas consumed exceeds the consump- 
tion in Munich, and also in Nuremberg. 



BRITISH MOTOR ACCIDENTS. 



Consul Walter C. Hamm, at Hull, sends the 
following summary of motor accidents and 
prosecutions occurring in Great Britain in 
April of this year and compares it with April 
of 1907. It will be seen that in every in- 
stance but one there has been a large increase, 
the figures for the same month in the respec- 
tive years being as follows : 

1908. 1907. 

Accidents 79 58 

Persons killed 25 16 

Persons injured 49 28 

Motorists summoned 310 158 

Motorists convicted 291 141 

Motorists convicted for driving danger- 
ously, etc 54 54 

Motorists convicted for exceeding the 

speed limit 218 74 

Motorists convicted for other offenses.. 19 13 

In six of the fatal accidents the motorists 
were blamed, while of the other accidents, in 
seven cases the injured persons were subse- 
quently awarded damages, and in ten cases 
the drivers were fined. There were four more 
instances of cars running away after causing 
accidents. The British public is becoming 
concerned over the increasing number of these 
accidents. It is probable that stricter laws 
governing the running of motor cars will be 
passed in the near future, intended to lessen, 
if not entirely prevent, such accidents. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and at not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
Or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER. B. C, Cor. Carrel and Powell Sts.. 
P. O. Box 1335. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Qulncy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

AUKRDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 334. 

PORTLAND. Or.. 51 Union Ave. 

ECREKA, Cal.. 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

SAX PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 2380. 

HONOLULU. H. T.. 821 Alakea St.. P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
S RATTLE. Wash., Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
x75. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., Colman Dock, Room 13, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 2155. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash., P. O. Box 42. 

Branches: 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash.. Colman Dock, Room 10, P. O. 
Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 
KETCHIKAN. 
TORINO. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal.. 200 M St. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. 8. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



DEVELOPMENT OF CHINA. 



Tatsienlu, in the province of Szechwan, 
vVestern China, is the last town before 
eaching the Tibetan border. It is situated 
it an elevation of 8400 feet, in the high 
nountains that extend through Western 
2hina into Tibet. To reach Tatsienlu 
rom Chungking it requires twenty-one days 
md from there to the Tibetan line eighteen 
idditional clays, the route crossing moun- 
ain passes over 15,000 feet high. 

Until the present dynasty the Tibetan 
xmndary line extended as far east as Tat- 
iienlu, but under the present regime it is 
low drawn eighteen days* travel farther 
vest, at the town of Batang. As this har- 
ler strip of territory is mostly populated 
ay Tibetans, they are under the jurisdic- 
ion of three Tibetan Kings, each having his 
listrict, but all under the sovereignty of 
he Chinese Government. 

Tatsienlu is a small town, with low 
wooden houses and a population of 9000, 
nostly Tibetans. Its strategical and com- 
nercial importance is due to being the gate- 
way to Tibet and the high plateaus to the 
lorthwest. In this district are the splendid 
grazing pastures, where a fine quality of 
wool is produced. Farther on is the Tachin 
river, which forms the boundary between 
Eastern Tibet and one of the aboriginal 
Chinese tribes called the Mantzu. A large 
trade is done here in rhubarb and music, 
the latter taken from the small hornless 
deer plentiful in this part of China. Of the 
exports of this district musk is the most 
valuable, the price of the medium quality 
being thirteen times its weight in silver. 
The product is obtained from a sac-like 
gland in the abdomen. It is carefuly dried 
and sewn in small bags, called musk pods, 
of one ounce each, made from the skin of 
the animal. The musk deer of Northwest- 
ern China is an allied species and is only 
found at an elevation over 8000 feet. It 
stands about twenty inches at the shoulder, 
but its chief characteristic is the absence of 
antlers in both sexes. The males have 
tusks protruding from the lower jaw to a 
length of three inches. The species is 
known as the Moschus sifanicus. 

Next in importance of exports is wool. 
This trade of late has diminished, owing to 
the disturbances on the border. The coarse 
sack-like wool cloth "mu-tsz" is worn by 
all Chinese coolies, while a fine grade dyed 
red, called "pulu," is the clothing of the 
higher class of the Tibetans. The lower 
classes, such as yak and pony drivers, wear 
entirely undressed sheepskins. About 45,- 
000 pounds of wool is received annually in 
Tatsienlu. 

Gold is known as "Huang huo" and is 
brought for sale in the form of dust, though 
sometimes nuggets are found. From 5000 
to 7000 ounces come to Tatsienlu annually. 
But little profit is made there, as it brings 
only $20 to $24 per ounce. The Tibetan 
confines mining to washing the alluvial sand 
in the river beds. He is averse to outsiders 
mining in his country, his antipathy to them 
being very great. The Tibetan wishes to be 
let alone and strongly resents foreign in- 
trusion. 



NORWEGIAN SARDINE TRADE. 



A meeting of the Norwegian Sardine Pack- 
ers was recently held at Stavanger to regulate 
prices, output and the number of establish- 
ments, with the following results : 

It was agreed that no fish should be packed 
during the months of February, March and 
April, a violation of which should be paid by 
a fine of 5000 crowns (crown equals 26.8 
cents) ; that a uniform price should be main- 
tained for the purchase of fish, and that the 
present manufacturers should in no way estab- 
lish factories in any other place or places. 
Stavanger, the first place in Norway where 
sardines were packed, to-day has fifteen estab- 
lishments. Some years ago a factory was 
established at Bergen, and now the city has 
five ; several factories were also put up at 
Haugesund. 

During the past season complaint has been 
general of overproduction, low prices, and 
excessive number of factories, which, with 
the financial crisis in the United States, has 
made profits small and has obliged packers to 
form a union or trust for their future wel- 
fare. 

While during the past year the export of 
sardines from France to the United States has 
decreased, the export of this article from Nor- 
way has increased from a few thousand dol- 
lars some ten years ago to $600,000 in 1907, 
and it is a matter of only a few years until 
the Norwegian output will equal that of any 
other European country. Large quantities of 
Norwegian sardines have been sent to France. 

Experiments are shortly to be made at Ber- 
gen of putting up sardines as they are packed 
at Bordeaux, instead of smoked. Whether 
this venture will be a success or not is to be 
determined. 



BRITISH SHIPBUILDING SLUMP. 



COMPULSORY INSURANCE. 



The Chilean Government has appropriated 
6,000,000 pesos, or $2,190,000 gold, to be 
used in building homes for the poor working 
class. 



A law for the compulsory insurance of 
private and certain public employes in Aus- 
tria will take effect on January 1, 1909. The 
law provides for the creation of a fund for 
the payment of annuities to incapacitated or 
retired private and certain public employes 
and the total annual payments to be paid 
by the employer and the employe. 

Persons not obliged to insure are: Those 
who have secured positions after their 55th 
year; those who, owing to former service, 
are already enjoying invalid or old-age an- 
nuities, etc. ; persons employed outside the 
limits of this law; employes of traffic rail- 
roads, the adjusting of whose claims for in- 
surance is to be provided for by the minis- 
try of railroads. 

Persons who are required to insure are : 
All persons who have completed their 18th 
years who, from one and the same employer, 
receive a monthly or yearly wage amount- 
ing to at least 600 crowns ($121.80) a year, 
and also all public employes, having no fixed 
claims for State, Invalid, or Old-Age pen- 
sions, as well as all pensions in favor of 
their heirs. Employes are, however, not con- 
sidered who render the following service: 
Persons engaged in the production of goods 
and rendering physical labor in the broadest 
sense, mining, agricultural, and factory 
workmen, apprentices, and servants; those 
to whom the domestic-employment law 
finds application, or who entirely, or almost 
so, render domestic service. 



Great Britain to-day has more money than 
work. Redundant capital lies idle or at the 
unproductive interest of 1 per cent. Redun- 
dant labor is idle at the season when employ- 
ment should be at its best. The distress is 
most marked in the shipbuilding and iron in- 
dustries. Unremunerative freights account for 
fourteen more vessels being laid up in the 
Tyne last week, making the total ninety-four, 
of 300,000 tonnage. In shipbuilding only 35,- 
000 arc employed, compared with 45,000 last 
year. 

Mr. Thackeray, president of the North of 
England Iron and Steel Trades Conciliation 
Board, declared that he could not remember 
trade so bad for forty years, except in 1886. 
Their membership had fallen by a thousand. 
The Mersey docks are full of laid-up vessels, 
and there are thousands of sailors without 
ships, while 500 ships' officers are walking the 
streets instead of the normal 50 or 60 out of 
employment. From 6,000 to 7,000 deck hands 
are without work. The men in hundreds may 
be seen sleeping out every night. 

The Glasgow distress committee estimate 
that next winter 6,000 heads of families will 
require providing for, but funds are exhaust- 
ed. Eight shipyards are without work. Ship- 
builders trace the "slump" to the abnormal 
cost of production and the shrinkage in 
freights. 

In Manchester the engineering and ship- 
building trades are in a very bad state. The 
workless number 15,000. The boiler-makers' 
trade-union reports about 10,000 or 20 per 
cent unemployed, mainly due to the shipbuild- 
ing trade depression, intensified by the engi- 
neering dispute on the northeast coast of En- 
gland. The prospect for the immediate future 
is very bad, as members largely depend upon 
the shipbuilding trade. 



LA ROCHELLE IMPROVEMENT. 



The shipping business at La Rochelle, 
France, has recently increased to such an 
extent that enlarged harbor facilities are a 
necessity. Extensive improvements, the 
first section of which is to cost $2,316,000, 
will be undertaken in the near future. When 
completed the new harbor will furnish 
abundant wharfage, docks, and two 1,000- 
foot dry docks. Ships drawing 30 to 33 feet 
may enter the harbor in perfect safety. 
There is to be a tide-water wharf, with water 
ranging from 35 to 45 feet, where ships may 
take coal direct from the cars. 

The tonnage of the port in 1880 was 500,- 
727; in 1900 it had risen to 1,475,666 tons, 
and in 1907 to 1,882,235 tons. The increase 
for the first four months of 1908, as com- 
pared with the corresponding period of last 
year, is 65,428 tons. 

The lines of trade of south and western 
France and northern Spain arc rapidly con- 
verging at La Rochelle, and with the com- 
pletion of the contemplated improvements 
the largest ships afloat will find that a con- 
venient port to frequent. 



Demand the union label on all products. 



As a result of the sharp competition be- 
tween Indian buyers for the Calcutta mar- 
ket and Chinese buyers for the Straits Set- 
tlements, the prices of elephant ivory tusks 
are kept so high that it is difficult for the 
Burmese ivory carvers to get ivory to keep 
them employed. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




EUREKA, CAL. 



A light with rifles between Ameri- 
can fishermen and Canadian officers 
took place on Lake Superior, opposite 
Whitefish Point, on October 8. 

A new record of four days, 18 hours 
and 40 minutes from New York to 
Galveston, Tex., was recently estab- 
lished by the new Mallory liner 
Brazos. 

As a result of the September exam 
iuations at the Naval Academy, 
twenty-four midshipmen will be 
dropped from the roll on account of 
deficiency in their studies. 

The greatest dock system in South 
America, with a frontage of twelve 
miles, will be put into operation 
when the planned extension of the 
present works of Rio Janeiro is com- 
pleted. 

A cablegram from Bahia Blanca 
says that the German steamship Lam- 
bert was totally lost, vessel and cargo, 
by fire at sea. All on board were 
saved and landed at Rio Janeiro. 

The British steamship Buffalo, at 
New York from Hull, reported yes- 
terday that on October 4, in latitude 
46.27 north, longitude 47.33 west, 
passed an iceberg 300 feet long and 
60 feet wide, setting to southward 
Arctic stream. 

President Roosevelt and the Cab- 
inet have decided that the grand re- 
view of the returning battleships shall 
be held in Hampton Roads on Febru- 
ary 22. After the review the fleet will 
go to New York for an extended 
stay. 

Captain Charles F. Hines and his 
crew of seven men of the wrecked 
schooner John A. Matheson were 
landed at New York on October 9 by 
the steamship Seminole. When picked 
up they had spent four days and 
nights in a 16-foot boat. 

The British barkentine Nora Wig- 
gins, from Havana to Philadelphia, 
was caught in a hurricane recently. 
The storm quickly reduced her to a 
mere hulk, and the crew, realizing that 
she was doomed, abandoned her. 
They were landed at Havana on Octo- 
ber 7. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 93 sail and steam vessels, of 9126 
gross tons, were built in the United 
States during September, 1908. The 
largest steel steam vessel included in 
these figures is the Mohawk, of 4623 
gross tons, built at Philadelphia, Pa., 
for the Clyde Steamship Company. 

Twenty-five men were drowned as 
the result of the foundering of the 
French fishing schooner Juanita on 
the Grand Banks recently. The sole 
survivor, the master of the vessel, 
who managed to cling to some planks 
for several hours, was brought to St. 
Pierre, Miq., on October 7. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 319 sail and steam vessels, of 
20,887 gross tons, were built in the 
United States during the quarter 
ended September 30, 1908. During 
the corresponding quarter ended Sep- 
tember 30, 1907, 330 sail and steam 
vessels, of 133,092 gross tons, were 
built in the United States. 

Captain Monroe and five of the 
crew of the British schooner Sirocco, 
who were supposed to have been lost 
when their vessel was wrecked off the 
Florida coast, on October 1, were 
landed on October 12 by the fruit 
steamer Horatius, in Boston. Two 
members of the Sirocco's crew, who 
had been picked up by a steamer, were 
landed at Newport News on the 10th. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



SMOKE, 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups. Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



SC ANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FiRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



UNION TRANSFER 

Baggage & Freight Shipped & Stored 

AT LOW RATES. 
DAVE AGGELER, Proprietor 

OFFICE, 119 D STREET 

WESTERN HOTEL BLDG. 
Phone Main 70 EUREKA, CAL. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



Cor. Second and 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN 



Prop. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnside 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

Transfer and Storage Rooms 

PHONE EAST 4441 

33 Union Ave. Portland, Oregon 



HONOLULU, H. T. 



THE "ALOHA" 

Harry Klemme, Proprietor. 

First-Class Rooms at very moderate 
rates. Summer garden attached. 

Cor. Queen and Richard Streets, 

HONOLULU, H. T. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F, 

EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



When making purchases from our 
idvertisers, always mention the Coast 
seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Jack Kittilsen is inquired for by 
Chas. Johnson, South Island, George- 
town Co., S. C. 

Ernst Sawitza, aged 23, last heard 
of in 1905, at that time a member of 
the Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 
is inquired for by Theo. Sieger, 1247 
Cottage Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 



Halvor Eugen Krogstad, a native 
Christiania, Norway, is inquired for 
by his brother. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

Sigurd Hagbard Borge, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific is 
inquired for by his father. Address. 
Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Wilhelm Schumacher, a native of 
Duisburg-Ruhrort, Germany, is in 
quired for by the German Consul, 51 
Third street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Wilford Lawton Easterbrook is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his present whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. Nettie L. Easter- 
brook, 146 East 26th street, Port- 
land, Or. 

David Rosenthal and David Selwin, 
natives of New Orleans, are inquired 
for by relatives. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 




SET YOUR COURSE 

FOR THE 

Store that Sells 



BOss^road 

r mum. 

OVERALLS 

Neustadter Bros. 

SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK PORTLAND 



DEMAND THE BRAND 




Seattle, Wash., Letter Lit, 

Letters at the Seattle Sailors' On 
Office are advertised for three mon 
only, and will be returned to the p 
Office at the expiration of that period 
not called or sent for. 



Abrahanson, John 

A.llo, F. 

Allen, J. W. 

Alexis, II. 

Anderson, Alfred 

Andersen, Sverri 

en, Lars T. 
Anderson, Gustaf F, 

Anderson, V. 

Anderson, A. -1445 

Anderson, Ed. -1323 

Anderson, Hans 

Apps, P. 

Arensen, Andrew- 
Atkinson, Sam 

Bakke. C. 

Baer, E. 

Bertelsen, Alf. 

Wellington, M. 

Bee, Colin 

Bengtsen, Johan 

Blomquist, B. -1700 

Bowling, T. 

Brodin, Julius 

Bruhn, W. -1430 

Brander, M. F. 

Buchtman, F. 

Casgersen, Chr. 

Calhoun, W. C. 

Carlson, K. G. 

Carlson, Ludvig 

Celander, W. 

Chester. J. 

Christensen, 0.-1223 

Christiansen, Olaf 

Christoffersen, Fmil 

Chrlstenaen, Johan 
Martin 

Chlsholm, Thomas 

Chudoleuv, Geo. 

Clauson, Christln 

Olarkson, C. 

Coni, V. 

Cronln, Oscar 

I «ahl. Sam 
Thos. 

! 'iiiw Millie. J. H. 

1 fowling, S. G. 

Eehelman, Th. 

E.lvards. Ed. -149 

Elwood. Alf. 

Eskelsen, N. P. 

Farm. T. R. 

Farmin, P. 

Frank, B. -499 

Fjelsbad, C. 

Franzell. R. 

Pournter, G. 
Vincent 

Gent, A. C. 

Genson, C. 

Gillfson, Frank 

Grusdln, Ed. 

Gustafson, W. -700 

Hansen, Theo. 

Hackehson, H. 

Haltness, M. 

Mange, M. W. 

Hazel, W. 

n C. -1263 
on, A. M. 

Hermansen, F. 

F. H. -1665 

Hcllison. H. 

Hixon, J. W. 

Haigaard, T. S. 

Hulbberg. Ernest 

Isaksen, Yerry 
lack. Paul 

.lames. Dan 

Jensen. Louis 

Jensen, A. -1650 

Jepson, Axel 

Johanson, Olaf 

Johnson. J. J. 

Jchannesen, Johan- 
nes 

Johnson, J. -983 

.Tohannesen, Carle 

Karlson, A. Isak 

ICalnow. A. 

Kane, M. 



Kalming, Jacob 
Kirwan, M. L. 
Kirst, Hans 
Klnnan, F. -492 
Klintberg, C. 
Kleine, Carl 
Klingenherg, John 
Knudson, Rasuta 
Krane, Carl 
Lahbonen, F. 
Larsen, F. -933 
I.auritson. Geo. 
Lind, Carl 
Lind, H. E. 
Lindherg. John ... 
Undholm, C.-18T4 
Lindstrom, K. J. 
Martlnsen, T. 
Martinsen, Alex. 
Mankovski, W. 
Man, H. 
McDonald, N. 
Mason. S. 
Maki, I. 
Mi-Clary, J. 
McLaughlin, J. I 
Mikkelsen, K. -It 
Moller, Vlex. 
Monaghan, las. 
Morris, W. T. 
Molver, Oliver 
Molver, Olaf G.- 
Morris, H. 
Monson, Martin 
Moihenson, If. 
Merdin, John 
Muhlhouser. Adolf 
Nilson. Carl 
Nitschi, C. 
Nilsen, N. A. -888 
Xilson, O. 
Xielsen. Jorgen 
Norholm. K. B. J 
Norrls, Ed. 
Xvman, Hector 
Nyberg, Eric 
Olsen, O. -1062 
Oisen, ir. -563 
Oisen. John Osca- 
Olafsen, M. 

Halver 
oisen. Johan 
Pederscn. Lars 
Pehrson, lljalmar: 

-1230 
PetWson, Richan* 

hi. Hans 
Peterssnn, A. -72J' 
Pendvllle, N. 
Petterson. S. A. 
Prttcrson, Oscar c 
Pemberton, I >. 
l'feifer, C. 
Pigarts. F. W. 
Fichanzo, A. 
Pschunder, H. 
Piernhagen, L. 
Rauen, T\'. 
Reynolds, Thos. 
Rolstad, O. E. 
Ryherg. O. 
Schmidt, Alf. 
Sehelin, W. C. 
Smith. K<1. 
Soderland. Anton i 
Sonderman, G. -M- 
Svenson, Hans 
Soderhind. J. F. 
Steinberg, Anton 
Stuhr. H. M. 
Summerell, H. 
Thomson, Rol. 
Valentine, Geo. 
Vagnhill. G. 
WaroVhofr, Alf. 
Wickblad. O. 
Wermundsen. J. 
Willodeen. R. 
T .VIHiam, Henry 
Williamsen, J. 
Walters, W. 
'/■■ be, G. 



INFORMATION WANTED, 

George Bourgevis is inquired for 1 
Ed. M. Bourgevis, who has net 
which will require his atention. A 
dress, 3104 West 99th street, Cle» 
land, Ohio. 

Ed. Larsen, also known as Ed\v» 
Torkelsen, last heard of in the ba 
Hesper in 1893, is inquired for by Y 
brother, Jonas. Address, Coast Se 
men's Journal. 

Olaf Johanneson, a native of & 
desfjord, Iceland, last heard of on t' 
Pacific Coast, is inquired for by I 
brother. Address S. J. Westdal, 
South street, New York City. 

Charles Johannes, a native of B« 
lin, Ontario, aged about 35, suppos 
to be on the Pacific Coast, is inquir 
for by relatives. Address, Coast S< 
men's Journal. 

Charles Porter, Fred Choate a 
Soren Sorensen, who were wrecked 
the Maggie C. Russ, are requested 
call upon Attorney H. W. Huttc 
Pacific Building, San Francisco. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 

JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY 

Cor. of HERON & G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



A. W. BARKLEY 

I Clothing and Furnishing Goods 
AILORS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 
116 South "G" Street, 

Aberdeen, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service, 
hone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 
ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI &t CO. 

(nts' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 

Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 

jices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 

I S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



\lexander & McBride 

I03 E. HERON ST., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Next door to Burnett Jewelry Store. 

Headquarters for Union-Made Goods, 
Nothing, Hats, Shoes and Oil Clothing, 
lubber Goods, Etc. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

IE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

«ON MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 
3HOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 
GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, 
xluslve Owner of "The Red Front." 



ORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 

Nothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 
'PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 
ound the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



has. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

»ORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 
1-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 
Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 
Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 
ry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
5 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 
Oscar Sunersson, last heard of 
bout four years ago when employed 
t a tug at San Francisco, is inquired 
>r by his brother. Address, Coast 
eamen's Journal. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots. Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 



1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE 



TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH, 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 
Visit 

THE NEW YORK STORE 

717 PACIFIC AVE. 
OLSON BROS. & CO., Proprietors. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Change of Ownership Sale 

McCormack Bros., of Tacoma, have purchased the entire stock and goods of 
Mr. Jacobson, 812-814 First avenue, Seattle, consisting of Men's and Boys' Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Men's Furnishing Goods and Shoes, etc., and intend to dispose of 
every dollar's worth before commencing to remodel the store, and the arrival of 
new Spring goods. This place will be run as a branch of the Tacoma concern, and 
our policy will be the same here as Tacoma, by carrying first-class Union Made 
goods at popular prices. 

In order to dispose of the present stock quickly we have marked it down to one- 
third and one-half its actual cash value. Bear in mind we never misrepresent 
anything in newspapers, store or otherwise. 

McCORMACK BROS. 

812-814 First Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opposite Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL. 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE. 

82 STEWART ST. 

Flat K, - SEATTLE, WASH. 

Office Phone, Ind. 1713. 
Res. Phone, Ind. X 7028. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAUTICAL SCHOOL, 

Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

CAPT. W. J. SMITH, - - Principal 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College. 
Author of Self-Instructor in Navigation. 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Ocean 
license unlimited. Steam and sail. 
American and British. 

494 Arcade Bldg. Phone Main 3300. 



R. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY & STEWART 

Undertakers 
Third and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 

Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or tele- 
graph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



^^ [XV I C \ 1^1 I i l^^^^^appears on the box in which 



you are served. 



E365B E51fcsEPH880j!jS5S£ 
Issued by Authority of ute Cigar Makers' International Union o 

Union-made Cigars 

2hiS ©(TlrflfiJ. Trot tie Clojrj contained inthls box lav. been mutt by a fid-OSS VMyUK 

i HiNbtR Or THE CWM MAKERS 'lltlf JlNATIOKAi UNION 0> America, an oruiuatxai devoted to the ad- 
vancement of roe MORAtMATBlAland iNTEItCCniM WltfART OF IH£ CRAIX Thornton) 
theso Cicars to all vnoKen. Uutrjqhoul tho world- 
M InhinqoiotQU upon lots Label or* bo punshod accoro'mo. to taw 



FAC 
**• SIMILE 



$ 7K (fiUfUua. toetuknt, 
' c.trrutf. 



\#«>Af!««i^iS<oS./VW..Vv*y'<-^ 




BY INSISTING UPON PURCHAS- 
ING UNION STAMP SHOES 

You help better shoemaking conditions. 
You get better shoes for the money. 
You help your own Labor Position. 
You abolish Child Labor. 

Do Not Be Misled by retailers who 
say: "This shoe does not bear the 
stamp, but is made under Union Condi- 
tions." 

This is false. No shoe is union-made 
unless it bears the Union Stamp. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




There were fifty-four new cases of 
cholera and twenty-seven deaths in 
St. Petersburg for the twenty-four 
hours ended at noon on October 14. 
It is said in political circles that 
ijreat Britain and France have prom- 
ised Servia their moral support if she 
maintains a peaceful course. 

Twenty-two members of the "Ilch- 
inhoi," the pro-Japanese organization 
of Corea, were recently killed by the 
Japanese gendarmes at Cholado. 

The mobilization of Turkey's Third 
Army Corps in Macedonia is regard- 
ed as due to a mistake on Bulgaria's 
part in calling out three series of re- 
servists. 

The first snow of the season fell 
at St. Petersburg, Russia, on October 
17, and it is thought that a week or 
ten days will see the end of the 
cholera epidemic. 

Native reports received at Amoy, 
China, from Chang How are to the 
effect that more than 300 lives were 
lost in that city as the result of a 
typhoon on October IS. 

Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria en- 
tered Sofia on October 12 as Czar 
of the Bulgarias and was given an 
enthusiastic reception by the whole 
population. 

The climax of the British suffragette 
campaign was reached on October 13, 
when an enormous mob hemmed in 
Parliament and stopped traffic in all 
streets leading to Westminster. 

The Paris Journal has appealed to 
the French Government to decorate 
Wilbur Wright, the American avia- 
tor, with the Legion of Honor in 
recognition of his success in aerial 
navigation. 

Bulgaria has backed down, accord- 
ing to the Turkish Embassador at 
Paris, and not only has the proba- 
bility of war been eliminated, but an 
understanding between Bulgaria and 
Turkey is in sight. 

Chinese postoffice business is in- 
creasing rapidly. The business dur- 
ing 1907 shows a gain of 50 per cent 
over the previous year. The increase 
in the receipts over expenditures is 
correspondingly large. 

A national convention of British 
and Dutch delegates, with the object 
of drafting a constitution which shall 
unite all the South African colonies 
in one federation, was opened at Dur- 
ban, Natal, on October 12. 

The number of new cases of 
cholera at Manila, P. I., has declined 
to about five cases daily, and these 
are chiefly confined to one or two 
of the congested native districts. The 
disease is gradually disappearing in 
the provinces, but few new cases be- 
ing daily reported from Rizal, La- 
guna, Cavite and Palawan. 

It is reported in London that a 
practical agreement has been reached 
by M. Iswolsky and Sir Edward Grey, 
under which the conference of the 
powers will discuss the question of 
compensation to Turkey, Servia and 
Montenegro, but the Dardanelles 
question will be left for separate ne- 
gotiations later between Russia and 
Turkey. 

Vassili C. Archangelski, member of 
the second Douma, has been con- 
demned to six years' imprisonment at 
hard labor for participation in the 
work of the revolutionary organiza- 
tion known as the League of Peas- 
ants. Eleven other members of the 
League have been condemned to 
terms of imprisonment ranging from 
four to eight years. 



14 



O ) AST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 







San Francisco Letter List. 



Another Mormon colony is 1< 
established near Reno, Nev., making 
four in Nevada in as many portions 
of that State. 

Reports of district superintendents 
wed that there are 20,408 children 
who can not be accommodated in the 
public schools of Philadelphia, I 

W ord has been received that an 
outbreak of the Sioux Indians is like- 
ly to occur at Fort Yates, X. D., if 
the bodies are removed From the In 
dian graves there. 

The Supreme Courl of Nebraska on 
her 22 sustained the legality of 
the Nebraska blue laws forbidding 
almost all Sunday business transac 
tions. 

The 3-cent passenger rate went into 
effect on October 19 on the trunk 
lines of Arkansas, taking ti- 
the 2-cenl rate which was ordered by 
the State Legislature in 1907. 

A petition signed by 70,000 persons 
was sent to President Roosevell from 
New York recently, asking thai he 
refuse the demand ,,f Russia For the 
extradition of Jan Janoff Pouren. 

A mob of 1000 persons stormed the 
jail at Spartanburg. S. C.. recently to 
lynch a nego who had attempted as 
sault on a white girl. Three men in 
the crowd were shot from th. 
windows. 

Mrs. George C. Howard, famous 
as the original Topsy in "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin," died on October 15 at 
her home in Cambridge. Mass.. aged 
79. Her maiden name wa- Caroline 
E. Fox. 

The- drawing in the big Rosebud 
land opening, to which hundreds of 
thousands throughout the country 
have looked forward with eager in- 
terest, took place at Dallas. S. I)., on 
October 19. 

In a speech delivered at Mon 
treal on October 16. Sir Wilfrid I. an 
rier, Canada's Premier, announced 
it campaign, which end- 
in a general election on October 26, 
will be his last. 

A shortage of about $300 is said to 
exist in the postoffice at Portland, 
Or., but n,i details are obtainable. 
Postoffice Inspector Richards admits 
that he is conducting an invesigation, 
but will add nothing further. 

A tele-ram was received by the 
roller of the Currency on Octo- 
ber 16 from Bank Examiner John B. 
Cunningham, stating that he bad 
closed the Union National Rank of 
Summerville. Pa. The bank has a 
capital of $50,000. 

Twenty creditors of the Municipal 
Traction Company, the holding com 
pany which operates the Cle\< 
(O.) Railway Company's car lines at 
a 3-cent fare, have joined in a suit 
asking that the company be pi 
in the hands of a receiver. 

Fifteen persons lost their lives on 
October 15 in the burning of the lie 
troit and Mackinaw Railway relief 
train, which was carrying the inhabi- 
tants of the little village "f Metz, 
twenty-three miles north of Alpena, 
Mich., to safety from the forest 
which were sweeping away their 
homi 

J. I!. Ilarkin, of the Department of 
the Interior of the Dominion Gov- 
ernment, I 1 the Hindoo ques- 
ti"n SO far as the province of Brit- 
ish Columbia is concerned. The en- 
tire Hindoo colony, consisting of 
more than 2000 persons, is to be 
moved from British Columbia to 
British Honduras. 



Letters a( the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will lie returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of five 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Alfred 

Alksne, Aug. 
Amundsen. Albert 
Amundsen, P. 
Anderson, -1108 
Andersson, -1391 
Andersson, -list 
Andersen, A. Emil 
Andersen, Rasmus 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, Olaf 
-on, C. T. 

Baggott, R. 
Banke, -1646 
Barber, A. a. 
Bartels, Herman 
Bastion, W. 

u. Erwin 
Baxter, W. 
Becker, Fred W. 
Behr, 1'. 
I :■ hrends. G. 
Baling, Oscar 
Bendixen, -457 
Bensen, -143 
Bensen, B. 
Bensen, H. 
Berglund, K. R. 
Bergqvlst, -1396 
Bernert, Fred 

i. Victor 
lieyerle, Ruppert 

Campbell. Geo. 
Carlsen, C. W. 
Carlsen, O. 

'ii. J. 
Carlson, A. 
Carlson, -758 
Carlstrom, Arvld 
Carstensen, of, 

en, Wm. 

tensen, Viggo 
( Ihrlstensen, 
Chrlstensen, Harold 
Christensen, Val. 

Dahlbeck, John C. 
I 'ahlen. Hugo 
Dahlman, J. A. 
Dahlof, John 
Banberg. A. 
Daugul, G. 
lie Baers. Henry 
Deising, E. 

Gaston, R. W. 
Eckman, Gus 
Efstrom, A. 
Eklund. Ellis 
Ekstrom, Geo. 
Eliasen, 10. 
I. E. 
Emanuelsen, C. 

l-'alk, John A. 
Fatt, Knut 
Findley, n. 
Fischer, Torsten 

n. Jonas 
K". 

Gad, Sophus 

a, Geo. A. 

Gtllholni, Albin 
i ioerke, Ed. 
Goers, F. 
Grant, John 

Haak, R. 
i iagbartsen, M. 
Hagedon, Chas. 
Haier, Fred 
Hall, W. F. 
Hammargrin, O. 
i iansen, Karl 
en, - 1 7L'.: 
I iansen, Hans M 
Hansen, I >. Rudolf 
i [arold O. 
Hansen, -1261 

i 'has. 
Harris, John E. 
Harris, J. 
Hassall, S. G. 
Heesche, H. 
Heino, W. 
Helin, Johan 

Jaansen, -1666 
Jakobsen, -1341 

eson, Joe 
i i M 9i hi, Oscar 
Janson, -1771* 
Jarvie. W. 
Jenson, Julian 
Jensen, Rasmus 
Jepson, Axel 
Johaneon, Ellis R. 
Johansen, Sigurd 
Johansen, C. I.. 
Johannesen. Johan 
Johannesen. Martin 
Johnsen, Fred 
Johnson, John E. 
Johnson, '".. Bdwln 
Johnson, John 

ECaaslk, A. 
Kahlbetzer, Ferd 
Kalnis, Harry 

. G. 
Karlgren, -644 
Karlson, -1158 
Karl son, C. E. 
Kelly, Thos. J. 
Kersteln, Carl 

i i. Sigurd 
Klasson, Karl 

Baanti. Moses 
Lahmeyer, H. 

Balir. Otto 

lers 
W. E. 
Landgren, J. 
Lang, f:us L. 
Lang, Chas. 
Lankewiz, Ernest 
Bantz. Qustal 
I,arsen. Lars 



Anderson, C. 
Anderson, A. C. 
Anderson, H. A. 
Andersson. -1246 

Andersson, Anders 
Andersson, -1520 
Andreassen, -1334 
Anenson, Gus 
Arnesen, Isak 
Asmussen, -1116 
Atkinson, Samuel 
en. Axel 

Blasich, Michael 

Blum. Albert 
Bodungen, K. 
Boisen. J. 
Boogren, Eric 
Boss. L. A. 
Bourbigou. Louis 

ler Win. 
Brandenberg, A. 
I a. unit. Fred 
Bredberg, Henrlk 
Brown, John 
Brown, 1142 
Buhlt, Ernest 
Buoos, Thomas 
Burdick, Chas. 
Burke. Eugene 
Burmeister, T. F. 
Burns. Chas. E. 
Burr, C. C. 

Christensen, S. 
Christensen, P. C. 
Christensen. II. 
Christensen, -1204 
Christiansen, Lars 

V. 
Christoffersen. Beige 
Clarke. R.. -1117 
Classen, Henry 
Coadon. -481 
Coakley, John 

Corrigan, -1380 

Cullen. Wm. 

den Haan. C. 
Dixon, John 
Dohman, F. 

Dories, H. 
I (owe, John 
Duran, R. 
Duke. E. T. 
Dyrnes, Ludv. E. 

Engdall, Fred 

gland, W. 
Eriekson, -493 
Eriksen, Edmund 
Eriksen, 10. M. 
Espensen, TO. N. 
Evensen, Andrew 

Foss. Laurits L. 
French, -407 
Froise, Johan 
Frosch, Wm. 
Fuchel, Gustav 

Grunberg, Thomas 
Gudmansen, A. B. 
Guillou, Joseph 
Gustafson, M. H. 
Gustafsson, J. E. 
Guzek, B. 



Hellstadius, G. W. 

Hendriksen, Adolf 
Hendrikson, C. E. 
Henriksen, A. G. 
Hermansen, Franz 
Hess, August 
Hesterberg, Max 
Hilarion, Chas. 
Hill, G. 
Hinner, Paul 
Hjort, Knut 
Hoehmann, Aleek 
Hohman, H. 
Holland, O. 
Hoist, R. 
Holt. Karl C. 
Hope, Ole 
Hutchinson, Ed. 
Husby, Lars 

Johnson, Chas. 
Johnson, J. E. 
Johnson, -1800 
Johnson, -1892 
Johnson, N. 
Johnsson. Frank 
Johannessen. A. 
Johansson, -1452 
Johansen, A. 
Johansen, E. R. 
Johansen, Andreas 
Johansen, -1677 
Johansen, -1219 
Jonasen, Johan 
Jones, Magnus P. 
Jones. P. 
Jurgensen, H. 



Klemensen, Evart 
Klint. Herman 
Klintberg, Chas. 
Knudsen, Peter 
Kohne, Ernst 
Kristlansen, L. A. 
Kristians.ii, Louis 
Kristiansen, Karl 
Kristoffersen, O. T. 
Kugam, Fred J. 
Kurella, Rudolf 

l.arsen, -1290 
Larsen, -644 
sen, -769 

Knut C. 
Lauritsen. Geo. 
Lausmann, John 
Laws, Harry 
Leahy, -925 
i. (inn. Gustaf 
Benn, Tonny 
Bersten, J. O. 



Liesman, Fritz 

ilk, S. 
Lllliebeck, Carl 
Lindberg, ,\ 
Lindholm, Erik 
i Indholm, ( iustaf 
Llndfors. Karl 
Lindkvist, -1014 
Undstrom, Anton 
Lindroos. Oscar 

Mackrodt, Jonny 

-Ma. Is. -n. C, II. 

Magnuson, Gust. 
Magnussen, Axel 
Magnusson, E. w. 
Maki, Ivar 
Marcus, Bernhard 
Marthinius, Olaf 
Marnoffer, Geo. 
Marthinsen, Markus 
Martinson, A. 
Mattsson. A. M. 
Mayer, Peter 

Kelson, Charles 
Nelson, -641 
Kelson, -935 
Nelson, -663 
Neumann, Aug. 
Xn ulaysen. H. 
Nielsen, -985 
Nielsen, Sivert 
Xilsen, A. 

Oetjen, Fred 
Ohlsson, Berthel 
O'Keeffe. W. 
Olsen, Chas. 
Olsen, A. H. 
Olsen. Dial' 10. -."a 
i Msen. Soren 
Olsen, -499 



I'arikka, Herman 
1'earson. John S. 
I'edersen, Louis 
Pederson, L. R. 
Ten aval, Wm. 
Persson, Johan 
Persson, Chas. 
I i -on, -943 
Petersen, Bertel 

y, H. 
Rasmussen, -497 
Reininghous, E. 
Reynolds, Gus 
John B. 
Rice, Patrick B. 
Rles, Willy 
Rignell, Chas. 
Rignell. Eric 
Rignulot. Bert 
I. W. 

Saarin. John 
Salvesen, Thorvald 
Sanchez. Vincent 
Sawberg, A. 
Schimmelphenlg, A. 
Schmldlen. -1987 
Schmidt, Fritz 
Schoeffler. Alfred 

Srh.ner, L. F. 

Schulz, Ernst 

Sehultz. Albert 
Schumacher, Wm. 
Schwartz, Mr. 
Scott, I'M 
Segerlin, Carl E. 
Sniffer, Chas. R. 
Sickler, Louis 
Sid, Edward 
Simpson, L. C. 
Sinyard. W. 
Siven. Viktor 
Sivertsen, Geo. 

Tamm. A. 

lid, Thomas 
Templeman. R. 
Thomas. Frank 
Thompson. Fred 
Thomson, Hans 
Thorsell, C. 
Thorell, Ch. 
Thorn, Arvld 

Plstad, Kristian 
Untermann, Frank 

Van Schoor, John 
Velss. -1107 
l, Fr. 
Videberg, Oscar 

Wahl. J. 
Wanlstrom, Alb. 
Wascott, Wm. 
Watson, Arthur 
Wells, Geo. D. 
Wellure, -1064 
Widejberg, Osear 
Williamson, A. 

Young, R. 

Zarnow, Otto 
Zass, John 



Lindskog. T. K. O. 
Lohne, lOven 
Loenecke, -1321 
Bowena. J. 
Lundberg, K. J. 
Ludvigsen, Arne 
Lundin, Fred 
Lucas, J. W. 
Bud low. Jack 

Otto 
urn, Hans. 
McCue, T. D. 
Mel I aire. John 
McLean. John 
Melander, Gus. 
Melin, Einar 

rs, Herman 
Mikkelsen, John 
Moller, Jens 

a. Andrew 
Mortimer. Ernst 
Murphy, Howard 

Xilsen, Carl J. 
Nil sen, Hans 
Xilsen, -784 
Xilson. Olaus 
Nllsson, Nat 
Noack, II. 
Nordenberg, Johan 
Norton, Jack R. 
Nyman, Gus 

Olsen. Ole 
Olsen, -1046 
Olson. -717 
i llsson, Wm. 
O.'sson, -945 

s, I tarry 
Orchard, s. H. 

Peltersen, Carl 
Pettersen, -1029 
Pettersen, Jens O. 
Peterson, John 
Poison, Carl 
Pratt, Fred 
Pratt, Bonis 
Prigent, J. -an 



Rints, T. 

in, Fred E. 
Robett. John D. 
Rolf, Helnrich 
Roosan, O 
RorhUS, Karl 

Faul 
Rosendorff, Chas. 
Rosenvold, Isak 
Ruthberg, Edw. 
Ruusik, M. 

Skeris. Mans 
Sjogren. K. A. 
Kkold, C. A. 
Skyskan, M. 
Smith, John A. W. 
Soedstrup, E. 
Sola, Emanuel 
Sorensen, James 
Stachau, John 
Stander, Arthur 
Steenson, Andreas 

u, Guido 
Stenberg, Alf. 
Stiemert. Otto 
Stone. Robert 
Suaminen. O. 
Sundbv. Emil 
Sundholm, -1579 
Sundman, Gus. 
Swanson, E. 
Swanson, Hugo 
Swensen, Carl 

Tillmann, Chas. 
Tjellman, Jonas 
Tin lander, O. 
Tollefsen, Andreas 
Torgenscn, Peter 
Tornkvist. M. 
Treudle. Louie 
Tyson, Wm. W. 

T'rsin, Johan 
Ursin, Kasper 

Virak, M. 
Vlacovich, John 
von Villemayor, W. 
Vucic, V. 

Winkel, Aug. 
Winter, Gotthard 
Winters, C. J. 
Witter, Johan 
Wirosky, M. 
Weker, Geo. 
Wold, H. 
Wolter, J. 



Zebe. Gustav 
Zimmerman, F. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Andersen, A. C.-1108 Carnaghan. Wm. 
Johnson, Chas. Swensen, B. 

Pt. Townsend Letter List. 

Andersen, Hjalmar Karvonen. Bars 
Asker. S. J. Le Fort, Guervis 

Hoffman. Tom Moberg, Alf. 

Henriksson, G. H. Williams, Chas. 
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Honolulu, H. T. Letter List. 

Andersen, F. C. Ferraris, J. 

Andersen, A. L. Holm. J. 

Andersen, Einar Janssen, H. -1555 

Clahsen, H. Helinor, Belin J. 

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Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Amundsen, Albert 

en, x. m. 
Andersen. Martin, 

-38 
Barnard, Cecil 
Bluhm. Louis 
Brobaek, Chas. 
Brooke:-. F. 

on, Chas. -1087 
Casey, Lawrence F. 
lOkiund.Sven W. 
Eliasen, Carl 
Fian/.ell, Arthur 
Guyader, Georges 
Hegan, Patrick 
Hewitt, Peter 



nans. W. 

Kurth. Hans 
Lindroos, A. YV. 
Madsen, G. F. -1677 
Medlicott, Fred 
McDonough, Ed. 
McFerran, .1 
McGinlay, Patrlcli 
Nilson, Alf. 
Nordblom, Ben 
Olsen. Martin 
Olsen, Sij4\ni<i 
Pedersen, h. p. .941 
Petersen, Ch 
Rajahn, Axel 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 

Andersson, J. S. Karlsen. Adolf Isak 

Aeekerle, E. Llnd, Hjalmar 

Berghold, Herman MaMsen.^1677 

Bagdon, Wilhelm Neuling, Albert 

Berthelsen, Alfred Osol, Theo. K 

Chevalier. Vincent Olson. John 
Eugen, John m -j- 

Holmes, T. A. Petersen, Frank A 

Hansen. Hans Cr. Rasmussen, Markus 

Hartman, Chas. Rasmussen, Erik J 

Holmherg, O. B. Sollen, Pierre 
Hesse. Eric r. Hans 

Johnson, C. A. Todal, Maarten 
Johannesen, J. -1441Tiksman, Chas. 

Knutson, A. Teigland, T. 

Kreman. Martin K. Winche, August 

Kone, Ernest Yates, James 

Eureka, Co/., Letter List. 






Anderson, Olaf 
Anderson, S. 
A muni. Walter 
Bastrom, C. 
Christensen, 10. H. 
Gustafson. Edward 
Gunther, Theo. 

m, Gustave 
Johnsen, J. -25 
Karlsson, E. 
Knudsen, Jacob E. 
Larsen, M. 
Borensen, O. C. 
Micheli, Agagtlna 



•M' ttemeljer, J. F. 
Moersmand. Gastan 
Niccolie, Sant. 
Nilsen, Ruder 
Nyland, Sven 
1 'man, Victor 
Plattner, Fred 

inske, R. 
Shuels. Christ. 
Skutul. A. 
Simpson. Bewis C. 
Svensen. Olaf 
Teigland. G. 
Thortensen, Peter 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Xils. 
Anderson, Axel. 
Andersson, -907 

Andersson, -1447 
Bertelsen, -1223 
Boysen, P. A. 
"n, Leo 



Morris. B. 
Maikliam, 1 1. 

Mattson, W. 

Mail. ohm. I f. 
Nilson. Karl 
Ollgrcen. K. 
Olsen, E. -515 



Christensen, AndersPettersen, -1164 
Christensen, -178 Petterson, -1037 



Carlson, K. E. 
Emanuelsen, A. 
Eliasen, E. 

Ellingsen, J. 
Foster, O. 
Hope, Ole 



Rytko, O. -716 

aond, L. 
Squires, 10. 
Smith, J. C. 
Swenson, Ben 
Stender, A. 



Hendricksen, II. R. Storvick, I. 



Hansen, Lars. 



Saar, H. 



Johannesen, M. E. Solberg, O. 



Jensen, . Jens 
Jensen, Nils 
Jalonen, J. 
Kjellgreen, A. B. 
Lau. G. 
Liliebeck, C. 
Lewis. J. M. 
Bunder, B. 
Be Gofflc, W